It's already begun?The reverse of the Magnetic Poles.Sun and Earth.

page: 1
21
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join

posted on Jan, 23 2012 @ 09:09 AM
link   
They say that this year will be a hard year for the Sun,and for us.
A reverse of the magnetic poles of the Sun will take place very soon,and we don't know what will be the effect,Yet.


TextThe Sun's magnetic poles will remain as they are now, with the north magnetic pole pointing through the Sun's southern hemisphere, until the year 2012 when they will reverse again. This transition happens, as far as we know, at the peak of every 11-year sunspot cycle -- like clockwork.
source(science.nasa.gov...

The solar activity is increasing every day and the reverse of the Sun's magnetic Poles could coincide with the reverse of Earth's magnetic poles or accelerating it.


TextEarth’s magnetic field also flips, but with less regularity. Consecutive reversals are spaced 5 thousand years to 50 million years apart. The last reversal happened 740,000 years ago. Some researchers think our planet is overdue for another one, but nobody knows exactly when the next reversal might occur. Although solar and terrestrial magnetic fields behave differently, they do have something in common: their shape. During solar minimum the Sun's field, like Earth's, resembles that of an iron bar magnet, with great closed loops near the equator and open field lines near the poles. Scientists call such a field a "dipole." The Sun's dipolar field is about as strong as a refrigerator magnet, or 50 gauss (a unit of magnetic intensity). Earth's magnetic field is 100 times weaker.
source(science.nasa.gov...

source(www.lmsal.com...

Are we prepared for the worst?




posted on Jan, 23 2012 @ 09:20 AM
link   
the pictures sure are pretty! i was wondering why,when i pour my morning coffee lately,the water seem to hover above the cup for a bit! adding milk is a bit tricky too!!!



posted on Jan, 23 2012 @ 09:47 AM
link   
Reading comprehension is not a given here is it?



posted on Jan, 23 2012 @ 10:03 AM
link   
From what I have been reading, it does appear that the sun this year will be giving us a hard time. Because Earth and the Sun do not exist in a vacuum, and the Sun is a heck of a lot bigger, we will be on the receiving end of plenty of CMEs, causing climate problems and disruptions of our electronic grid.

I didn't quite understand how the Sun can affect our magnetic field (it may be too early in the morning for me and I don't drink coffee anymore), but I don't believe that we can totally be prepared for a pole shift. I cannot imagine how insane things would get this time around. I'm assuming the last pole shift had a lot fewer people and infrastructure to mess with.

Worse-case scenario from a raving fear-monger: www.howtosurvive2012.com...

A more sedate, but nevertheless scary explanation: www.halexandria.org...



posted on Jan, 23 2012 @ 10:17 AM
link   
reply to post by reficul
 



the pictures sure are pretty
It'a all about the effects we can get from such events,and it's only the beginning,I think.


+5 more 
posted on Jan, 23 2012 @ 10:18 AM
link   
I put a drop of crazy glue on my fridge magnets ,just in case ...



posted on Jan, 23 2012 @ 10:20 AM
link   
reply to post by FissionSurplus
 



I didn't quite understand how the Sun can affect our magnetic field
We don't know what could be the ideal,"perfect environment" to have the perfect disaster with consequences that we cannot imagine yet.



posted on Jan, 23 2012 @ 10:23 AM
link   

Originally posted by SpongeBeard
Reading comprehension is not a given here is it?


"This transition happens, as far as we know, at the peak of every 11-year sunspot cycle -- like clockwork."





posted on Jan, 23 2012 @ 10:24 AM
link   
reply to post by the2ofusr1
 



I put a drop of crazy glue on my fridge magnets
I gathered mine and they are more than 100.



posted on Jan, 23 2012 @ 10:29 AM
link   

Originally posted by SpongeBeard
Reading comprehension is not a given here is it?

TextNuclear energy is typically hundreds of thousands or millions of times greater than chemical energy or approximately 1% of the mass energy from the Einstein mass formula. The mass of a proton is : The chemical energy of the hydrogen atom is the separation energy of an electron from a proton. It is given by the Rydberg constant from the Bohr theory of the hydrogen atom : . The relative change of mass is the hydrogen chemical energy divided by its mass, here the proton mass : It is so small as to be unmeasurable directly by weighing, but can be calculated, using the Einstein formula, from the measured chemical energy. Nuclear energy is usually "explained" by a hypothetical "strong force". However, it has been shown [4] that it may be obtained by a similar formula with values intermediate between the Einstein mass and the Rydberg constant : This value is not far from the deuteron binding energy, 2.2MeV, which is also the neutron-proton separation energy. The relative change in mass is : Knowing the formulas characterizing the nuclear and chemical energies, one obtains their ratio : hundreds of thousands The two preceding calculated values are comparable with the one million and one per cent ratios evaluated from experimental binding energies. The symbols used are Mass energy of the proton EP Nuclear energy EN Chemical energy EC Proton mass mp = 938MeV Electron mass : me = 0.5MeV Fine structure constant :
source(en.wikipedia.org...


+1 more 
posted on Jan, 23 2012 @ 10:36 AM
link   
reply to post by diamondsmith
 


Well for one your link regarding the solar maximum is out of date. The next solar maximum isn't scheduled until spring 2013 and it is predicted to be the least active solar maximum in recent memory. Second, a geomagnetic reversal takes a long time to complete. We're talking over the course of thousands of years. There is absolutely no correlation between a geomagnetic reversal and the solar maximum.



posted on Jan, 23 2012 @ 10:36 AM
link   
This happens every 11 years and even during the last event we had a relatively 'hard time'. The only difference this time is thanks to the Internet now being commonplace more people are finding out about this 'extraordinary event' that has happened at least once if not several times in the person's lifetime (depending upon their age obviously).

Some of the sunspots in the last cycle make this one look pretty tame...

epod.usra.edu...




posted on Jan, 23 2012 @ 10:36 AM
link   
reply to post by Blarneystoner
 


You beat me to the punch!

The sun's poles do flip every 11 years. Nothing new or amazing here.

Just an event that has happened long before we were around, and will continue long after we're gone.



posted on Jan, 23 2012 @ 10:46 AM
link   
reply to post by Xcalibur254
 



We're talking over the course of thousands of years. There is absolutely no correlation between a geomagnetic reversal and the solar maximum.

TextThe rate of reversals in the Earth's magnetic field has varied widely over time. 72 million years ago (Ma), the field reversed 5 times in a million years. In a 4-million-year period centered on 54 Ma, there were 10 reversals; at around 42 Ma, 17 reversals took place in the span of 3 million years. In a period of 3 million years centering on 24 Ma, 13 reversals occurred. No fewer than 51 reversals occurred in a 12-million-year period, centering on 15 million years ago. Two reversals occurred during a span of 50,000 years. These eras of frequent reversals have been counterbalanced by a few "superchrons" – long periods when no reversals took place.[7]
source(en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jan, 23 2012 @ 10:49 AM
link   
reply to post by diamondsmith
 





This transition happens, as far as we know, at the peak of every 11-year sunspot cycle -- like clockwork.




Earth's magnetic field also flips, but with less regularity. Consecutive reversals are spaced 5 thousand years to 50 million years apart. The last reversal happened 740,000 years ago

Did you even read your own sources?

Did the Earth endure mass destruction from natural disasters or flip poles in 2000?

NO.
edit on 1/23/2012 by Chamberf=6 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2012 @ 10:53 AM
link   
First, I have a headache,


TextMagnetic storms and headaches The geomagnetic storms we have been experiencing cause me to have severe headaches and sometimes visual field aberrations, such as a flattening of my vision and depth perception, as well as some cognitive dysfunction. I have correlated these with the strength of the storms and flares by keeping a diary and checking it against the info put out by spaceweather.com on the daily email lists. My question is do you know of any way to counter act the effect of these ion storms on humans? I am aware of currently proposed research projects for shielding Cardiac ICUs since the storms are correlated with an increase in heart attacks. I have asked this of many doctors, both main stream and alternative practitioners. I always get a no but let me hear from you if you find out.
source(www-spof.gsfc.nasa.gov...



posted on Jan, 23 2012 @ 10:54 AM
link   
11 years ago all my fridge magnets dropped onto the floor !
I could'nt be arsed picking them up as I knew that this year
they'll all jump back on again !


Peace



posted on Jan, 23 2012 @ 10:56 AM
link   
reply to post by diamondsmith
 


From your own source, the reply:


To a scientist such effects must seem very unlikely. The magnetic field at Earth is about 0.5 Gauss, and magnetic storms change it by 1% at most.

Have you ever undergone MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) of your head? I have. First you must remove all iron objects from your pockets or body (watches, pens etc.), lest they fly off in the strong magnetic field and stick to the magnet. You then go to a room with a big doughnut-shaped machine, and lie on a pallet which wheels you into the hole of the doughnut, until your head (or other body part being examined) is in its middle. Then it scans you for a few minutes (you may not move, it's a time exposure) with a loud racket, and finally wheels you out again.

During those minutes your head may be exposed to 1000 gauss--maybe several thousand, I do not know the exact numbers. I never had a headache or sensed the magnetic field. But you may also ask operators of such machines (or search the web) to find more.

Effects similar to those of magnetic storms occur frequently in Fairbanks, Alaska, during "magnetic substorms" accompanying the polar aurora. You may ask doctors in hospitals there if they find any effects. My guess is that they don't.

So--sorry, but I must add my voice to the negative chorus. One could shield rooms (see www.phy6.org...) but I doubt that a valid reason exists.



posted on Jan, 23 2012 @ 10:57 AM
link   
reply to post by diamondsmith
 


And what do you know pretty much all of those examples you gave are talking about events occurring over millions of years. Meaning that there's no reason that it wouldn't take a geomagnetic reversal thousands of years to complete.



posted on Jan, 23 2012 @ 11:09 AM
link   

Originally posted by Xcalibur254
reply to post by diamondsmith
 


And what do you know pretty much all of those examples you gave are talking about events occurring over millions of years. Meaning that there's no reason that it wouldn't take a geomagnetic reversal thousands of years to complete.

TextMore examples of the Sun's influence on the Earth can be seen via the interplanetary magnetic field and the solar wind. When the plasma from the Sun's corona, called the "solar wind," rushes out into interplanetary space, it contains an imprint of the Sun's magnetic field. As the Sun rotates, the magnetic field, one line fixed to the Sun, twists into an Archimedes Spiral shape, reversing its polarity every eleven years. The rippled sheet triggers aurora and other electromagnetic disturbances on the Earth as the planets ride the ripples above and below the solar plane of zero magnetism. Coronal mass ejections (CME) also trigger aurora and other electromagnetic disturbances on the Earth. These dramatic discharges of coronal material contain up to 11,000 million tons of solar matter traveling at a million miles per hour.
source(solar-center.stanford.edu...





new topics
top topics
 
21
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join