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Grenbank UFO debris (photos)

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posted on Jan, 22 2012 @ 06:30 AM
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Before I get to the pics let me explain why I have these pics without a link to where i got them.

Lately I have been trying to remember the name to a book I read years ago, I remember being intriuged by the photo's in the book. well I just stumbled across it on-line "Alien honeycomb : the first solid evidence of UFOs"
written by John Pinkney and Leonard Ryzman.

The book has some great accounts of UFO sightings in Australia, and in particular it focused on the Greenbank UFO crash debris. and it includes some good photos of the debris. I was very happy that the full book is online and includes the pictures.
so I spend the next few hours reading over the story again.

Next I do a search on ATS and only found the case mentioned in an old thread or two, so I immediately start to put a thread together, first I download the pictures to my pc, than I go back to copy some quotes and the book is gone

I know it must be a coincedence and have been removed for copyright or some other mundane reason but it still freaked me out a liltle.
This is the link to where the book was posted www.scribd.com...
eta Please disregard ATS member IsaacKoi found the link for me www.scribd.com...

There is not much on the web I could find about the case, if anyone could add a good link it would be appreciated.

The debris was found on different times between 1968 to 1975 on a ranch in the Australian town of Greenbank by Jean Fraser. The debris material was widley thought to be normal aircraft debris, and it does look very man-made imo.
But this also asks some questions. What aircraft did this come from? wouldnt someone have missed this plane? or did it manage to continue flying with the apperant damage?
could it have been somthing else like a satillite or top secret military craft? Lenticular Reentry Vehicle (LRV) was even considered Lenticular Reentry Vehicle (LRV)
www.military.com...
There was reportedly a large amount of interest from the RAAF

heres what Bill Chalker says ufoupdateslist.com...

It's seems to have been a long time since this debris has been talked about, so i'd love to hear what the ATS members think the crashed debris might originate.

I'm sorry I cant add more information as most of it came from the book, but I'm sure someone will be able to find more on he original case.

here are the pics.

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edit on 22/1/12 by dadfortruth1 because: (no reason given)

edit on 22/1/12 by dadfortruth1 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 22 2012 @ 06:34 AM
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Originally posted by dadfortruth1
Lately I have been trying to remember the name to a book I read years ago, I remember being intriuged by the photo's in the book. well I just stumbled across it on-line "Alien honeycomb : the first solid evidence of UFOs"
written by John Pinkney and Leonard Ryzman.
...

Next I do a search on ATS and only found the case mentioned in an old thread or two, so I immediately start to put a thread together, first I download the pictures to my pc, than I go back to copy some quotes and the book is gone

I know it must be a coincedence and have been removed for copyright or some other mundane reason but it still freaked me out a liltle.
This is the link to where the book was posted www.scribd.com...



In fact, the book "Alien honeycomb : the first solid evidence of UFOs" by John Pinkney and Leonard Ryzman is still on Scribd.

See:

www.scribd.com...

In relation to analysis of the relevant "honeycomb" material, see also Bill Chalker's article at the link below in relation to this book:

www.project1947.com...

Bill's article included the following:



As an industrial chemist and someone who was promoting serious research into possible physical evidence for UFOs, I was interested in finding out more when the book first appeared. The authors did not assist independent research into their material. Based on visual assessments I had concluded the material was AEROWEB high strength honeycomb, some of which is made from fibreglass - a clearly human-sourced material. Soon other researchers,such as Paul Hebron, of UFO Research (Queensland), had acquired samples of the material from the site in question. A researcher working for sceptic Dick Smith received some of the "alien honeycomb" from the same person who provided the authors with their material. A clear relationship was established between this material and the material held by Pinkney and Ryzman. Dick Smith financed an analysis through Unisearch laboratories, and not surprisingly confirmed that the "alien honeycomb" was not so alien - it was fibreglass! So much for "the first solid evidence of UFOs." More compelling examples of unusual debris or material related to UFO events have been documented. However in this case it was clear that the material had nothing to do with UFOs.



edit on 22-1-2012 by IsaacKoi because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2012 @ 06:34 AM
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That just looks like honeycomb from an old bee hive.



posted on Jan, 22 2012 @ 06:39 AM
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It would be interesting to find out if these various pieces of debris have been tested on by scientists but I would imagine due to the lack of information on this particular incident involving the possibility of UFO activity there hasn't been yet. There isn't a lot to go, even with pictures of the debris as they could be absolutely anything. Perhaps a resident expert could explain what they are.



posted on Jan, 22 2012 @ 06:44 AM
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reply to post by ProfessorT
 


It seems to consist of known Earth materials although has traces of titanium and other exotic elements and is a complex construction (for the time)
It also seems to have suffered burning that could have been caused by re-entry.

It's also reportely very light and a good heat insulator, which again makes me think satillite or rocket.



posted on Jan, 22 2012 @ 06:46 AM
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reply to post by IsaacKoi
 


hey thanks for that

not sure where i went wrong, I thought it had gone



posted on Jan, 22 2012 @ 06:59 AM
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reply to post by IsaacKoi
 




As an industrial chemist and someone who was promoting serious research into possible physical evidence for UFOs, I was interested in finding out more when the book first appeared. The authors did not assist independent research into their material. Based on visual assessments I had concluded the material was AEROWEB high strength honeycomb

After a simple google image search, it does look similar.
I guess the only questions are who's and what plane was this? was this "AEROWEB" used on most or all aircraft or more exotic planes back then? and why wasn't this plane missed by some one?



posted on Jan, 22 2012 @ 07:06 AM
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to answer my own question



1. Aircraft debri: 3 aircraft are known to have crashed in the area
One of them - a Canberra bomber - apparently crashed in
the area during 1965. Two Liberators came down apparently
sometime in the 1950s. Canberras had some of type of material in
panels etc. Mrs. Fraser & family began finding debri in 1968.
Eventually more extensive quantities were found. The military
were called in. There was some publicity to their involvement
during November, 1970, but exotic explanations were not under
consideration.
2. Railway carriage debri - Greenbank is on a railway line.
Truck material, according to several local Greenbank area
sources.


I should read my own links a bit better



posted on Jan, 22 2012 @ 07:27 AM
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its actually the insides of a catalytic converter

i am sure its been posted somewhere here before



posted on Jan, 22 2012 @ 07:32 AM
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Originally posted by 2012king
its actually the insides of a catalytic converter

i am sure its been posted somewhere here before


Hi 2012king,

I think you have another incident/object in mind:

www.abovetopsecret.com...



Dadfortruth1 - I don't know if you got the brief U2U I sent to you earlier in case you want to edit your thread title to correct the typo (which refers to "Grenbank", instead of "Greenbank") before the edit window expires.



posted on Jan, 22 2012 @ 08:15 AM
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Looks like carbon-fiber/kevlar honeycomb composite.. I've seen that used before on LeMans LMP and GT class cars, as well as guess this one... Satellites, and other miscellaneous scientific space debris/items.



posted on Jan, 22 2012 @ 09:01 AM
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reply to post by IsaacKoi
 


yeah thats the one


i still think its the same stuff though, as in the pics it looks like some sort of heat wrap bandage around it, consistant with what you might find on an exhaust



posted on Jan, 22 2012 @ 12:00 PM
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Originally posted by 2012king
its actually the insides of a catalytic converter

i am sure its been posted somewhere here before


I wouldn't be too sure of that if I were you. The use of catalytic coverters in autos began in the US in 1974 model years (I seem to recall that a few '73model years had them also.)

Perhaps I missed something, one claims seems the material is metal, and some of the images certainly seems to show that and sombody else chimes in to say it is definitely fiberglass. More than one substance? Tests should then easily make for a correct determination.

Keep in mind that the military makes an intense effort to remove the crash remains of any current or truly exotic a/c. (You can find sites on the internet by civilian "collectors" devoted to the search for and recovery of even the smallest pieces.

Perhaps the whole affair is bogus?
edit on 22-1-2012 by Aliensun because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 25 2012 @ 06:14 AM
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most mainstream production of cat converters was in the mid 70s, but they started developing them in the 50s so its still a possibility



posted on Jan, 25 2012 @ 07:38 AM
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Well wow this is a big surprise!!!!

I served in the Aussie Army, and I don't know about anyone here who knows about this, but Greenbank is actually now known as one of the biggest Australian Defence Force DOD training establishments on the south coast of Queensland Australia.

I have spent a fair amount of time in there, never had a clue about this wow, brings back memories, if I had of known I would have kept my eyes open a little more during exercises. It is a pretty massive place not too far out of Brisbane, you wouldn't have a clue its there really unless you were a local or in the military.



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