Could Spica possibly be Niburu?

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posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 09:23 PM
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reply to post by stereologist
 


I know that the term 'even horizon' was made popular in various movies about black holes etc. but here's the first definition that comes up on a search:

en.wikipedia.org...


In general relativity, an event horizon is a boundary in spacetime beyond which events cannot affect an outside observer.


Astronomical anomalies can always suggest, among other explanations, a new object. They always have.

As far as the horns - OP said he saw them using google sky when selecting infra-red. I don't know that much about how google sky comes up with their sky and if it's pasted together from old plates - don't know. I'm completely unfamiliar with any well-known horned plate artifact. Intrigued though - on both counts.




posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 01:53 PM
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reply to post by luxordelphi
 



Astronomical anomalies can always suggest, among other explanations, a new object. They always have.

That's not true. Anomalies do not have to or do suggest a new object. The Pioneer anomaly is one of the best known and certainly did not suggest a new object.

Your original use of event horizon was wrong.

There is no horned object. There is a smudge which is being described as horned. It is a well known artifact.





 
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