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Heres the full 72 page megaupload DOJ indictment

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posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 05:24 PM
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Heres the full 72 page megaupload DOJ indictment


thenextweb.com


Though the public-facing Megaupload.com website itself does not allow searches,it does list its “Top 100 files”, which includes motion picture trailers and software trials that are freely available on the Internet. The Top 100 list, however, does not actually portray the most popular downloads on Megaupload.com, which makes the website appear more legitimate and hides the popular copyright-infringing content that drives its revenue.
(visit the link for the full news article)


edit on 20-1-2012 by cerebralassassins because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 05:24 PM
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Have no idea as to what of the site i should have posted this but since this is a hot topic and everyone should be well aware of what we are all facing, many may be to young to fully comprehend the impact and others might not be that aware as to the reasons why this has happened. So in the interest of neutrality i ask you all to download and read it for yourself's.

www.scribd.com...

thenextweb.com
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 20-1-2012 by cerebralassassins because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 05:27 PM
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I wonder if they had to wait 72 minutes before they were able to view the full 72 page megaupload DOJ indictment..




posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 05:32 PM
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Originally posted by SmoKeyHaZe
I wonder if they had to wait 72 minutes before they were able to view the full 72 page megaupload DOJ indictment..


you made me laugh.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 05:59 PM
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Originally posted by SmoKeyHaZe
I wonder if they had to wait 72 minutes before they were able to view the full 72 page megaupload DOJ indictment..



Oh....the irony !




posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 06:01 PM
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WHOA!!!! 110million dollars?????

Holy moly!



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 06:02 PM
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Yeah, I was trying really hard not to post that..coz it's a pretty serious topic.

But it was hard not to.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 06:11 PM
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This whole thing is insane. With the same logic, they may as well close the post office for transporting illegal goods too.
This is just a move to promote big cloud operators like Apple that cooperate with the gov anyway.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 06:23 PM
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I would tell the owner to move the site to sweden and be protected under swedens laws. Did NZ physically confiscate his servers? I hope he was using TrueCrypt on his servers so there is no evidence that can be brought up into court.

Once again this goes to stress the importance of using home encryption on your systems. My computer is 100% fully encrypted, just basic common sense..
edit on 20-1-2012 by THE_PROFESSIONAL because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 06:58 PM
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The part that stands out, here, is this:


It was further part of the Conspiracy, from at least September 2005 until July 2011, that the Conspiracy provided financial incentives for users to upload infringing copies of popular copyrighted works. The Conspiracy made payments to uploaders who were known to have uploaded infringing copies of copyrighted works.


thenextweb.com...

... Now, that is illegal, if the claim is substantiated.

Personally, I think there are more important cases involving Human Trafficking that need to be addressed, here In America, by the DoJ... but that doesn't change the law.

Of course - if I were I the judge, I would give an attempt to seek damages a run for its money. They would need to demonstrate reliable and consistent evidence that the downloads of particular copyrighted material actually led to a loss. Don't know about the rest of you all - but if I download something for free, I'm probably not going to buy it in the first place... presuming it's even available in my region.

But the criminal end of this does need to be investigated and upheld if substantiated. It's one thing to allow your users to run a little wild and wooly with the content they upload to your servers (acknowledging they retain liability for its legality). It's another to pay them to upload copyright-protected material.

So, I can't say I am willing to view these indited individuals as martyrs.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 09:21 PM
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Yeah sure...indictment is not a convoction so dont put the verdict before the trial....
The gov boys are always manufacturing evidence and with holding other evidence which may harm their cases.....
Who needs corporate justice...?
We need laws to protect the people not the corporations that bleed us already.....



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 11:35 PM
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Nevermind those laws, when you feel the record companies are overcharging for a cd then it's your right to just take it. If you think a videogame is too expensive for you, it's your right to just pirate it. If a movie sucks, it's your right to take it, since you weren't gonna pay for it anyway. And if the creators of said sucky content have the audacity to protest you taking it(when you didn't want it anyway) its your right to to crash their website, because it's not art if you expect to be compensated for that which cost you money to create. All that matters is your personal opinion, if you think it sucks or cost too much, the law should be set aside just for you.
edit on 20-1-2012 by Gigatronix because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 21 2012 @ 12:42 AM
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reply to post by stirling
 



Yeah sure...indictment is not a convoction so dont put the verdict before the trial....


No one is. I was simply stating that it is not just a case of intrusive government.


The gov boys are always manufacturing evidence and with holding other evidence which may harm their cases.....


Do you think MegaUpload was not capable of this?


We need laws to protect the people not the corporations that bleed us already.....


We need reasonable laws that apply uniformly to the populations under their jurisdictional authorities. If it is wrong for me to sell my fan-fiction of Naruto or encourage people to upload your story you've spent years on (offered to premium users...) so that it can be pirated for free and drive my ad-space revenue.... then it is wrong for Mega-Upload to do the same to anyone - no matter who or what they are.

reply to post by Gigatronix
 



All that matters is your personal opinion, if you think it sucks or cost too much, the law should be set aside just for you.


.... I, sheepishly, admit that you had me going up until I got to this part.

The sad part is... I did not, in the slightest, expect the first several lines you posted to be sarcasm. I found it to be within the expected range of ATS comments on the issue.

And I had a nice line about applying cluster munitions to people I find annoying, too.... But perhaps such melodramatic statements of violence should be avoided... people don't find them as humorous as they used to.



posted on Jan, 21 2012 @ 11:39 AM
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Originally posted by Gigatronix
Nevermind those laws, when you feel the record companies are overcharging for a cd then it's your right to just take it. If you think a videogame is too expensive for you, it's your right to just pirate it. If a movie sucks, it's your right to take it, since you weren't gonna pay for it anyway. And if the creators of said sucky content have the audacity to protest you taking it(when you didn't want it anyway) its your right to to crash their website, because it's not art if you expect to be compensated for that which cost you money to create. All that matters is your personal opinion, if you think it sucks or cost too much, the law should be set aside just for you.
edit on 20-1-2012 by Gigatronix because: (no reason given)


I am unable to identify sarcasm in this post.






posted on Jan, 21 2012 @ 11:48 AM
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Originally posted by Gigatronix
Nevermind those laws, when you feel the record companies are overcharging for a cd then it's your right to just take it. If you think a videogame is too expensive for you, it's your right to just pirate it. If a movie sucks, it's your right to take it, since you weren't gonna pay for it anyway. And if the creators of said sucky content have the audacity to protest you taking it(when you didn't want it anyway) its your right to to crash their website, because it's not art if you expect to be compensated for that which cost you money to create. All that matters is your personal opinion, if you think it sucks or cost too much, the law should be set aside just for you.
edit on 20-1-2012 by Gigatronix because: (no reason given)


What if we make our own content?



posted on Jan, 21 2012 @ 03:58 PM
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reply to post by John_Rodger_Cornman
 


If you create your own content, then it's up to you to decide how you want it to be used. Here's a few scenarios:

You create your own music/movie/game. You ask for a small donation to support your endeavour, or maybe price it at less than retail price comparable to a commercial music/game/movie. It gets pirated and uploaded and traded around. This should bother you because you asked for a reasonable contribution in exchange for the time and effort you put into it.

You create your own music/movie/game, and put it out for free. Somebody takes it and uploads it and trades it around. It becomes really popular, so popular in fact, that now some websites are making money off of it by charging to have access to it, or compensating someone who can deliver a high quality version of your product to them. So other people are making money off of it and you're not. Is this ok for you?

A 3rd scenario: You make your product free, and people like it and appreciate it so much, that they go out of their way to send you a donation as a sign of support. You'd like this right?

Last scenario: You create something and distribute it for a reasonable price, and people pay it willingly. Nobody feels the need to pirate it, and you make a respectable paycheck from your work. You use this money to create more content, and every time you repeat this process you get a little more money than the last time, allowing you to create more content, at a higher quality, at a faster pace. You might even be able to bring a few friends on board to help. You create, you sell, you create more. Maybe, just maybe, you are able to start up your own little business, and give people jobs, do something you love, and create things people enjoy.


Now of the 4 scenarios, which sounds most likely, and which sounds most preferable, to you the content creator?



posted on Jan, 21 2012 @ 06:49 PM
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those dudes were making too much money off us sharing files....cmon...f them.

but i still hope to go online and find what files i want, no charge and "72 minute limit reached" nonsense.

funny to watch....

peace



posted on Jan, 21 2012 @ 07:12 PM
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reply to post by SmoKeyHaZe
 


That Would Have Been Funny



posted on Jan, 22 2012 @ 12:20 AM
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reply to post by John_Rodger_Cornman
 



What if we make our own content?


en.wikipedia.org...


Desura is a digital distribution platform developed by DesuraNET for Microsoft Windows and Linux platforms. Visiting the site on Mac OS X reveals a message that they are working on Mac support with an option to be notified by email when available. It is used to distribute games and related media online, with a primary focus on small independent developers rather than larger software houses. Desura also offers community features, automated game updates, and developer resources.


en.wikipedia.org...


Steam is a digital distribution, digital rights management, multiplayer and communications platform developed by Valve Corporation. It is used to distribute games and related media online, from small independent developers to larger software houses. Steam also has community features, automated game updates, in-game voice and chat functionality.

As of January 2012, there are 1504 games available through Steam,[4] and 40 million active user accounts.[5] The concurrent users peak was 5 million on January 2nd, 2012.[6] Although Valve never releases sales figures, Stardock, the previous owner of competing platform Impulse, estimated that, as of 2009, Steam had a 70% share of the digital distribution market for video games.[7]

Many major publishers have large catalogues available on Steam, including Bethesda Softworks, Activision, Rockstar Games, Square Enix, 2K Games, Sega, and Telltale Games.


en.wikipedia.org...


Impulse is a digital distribution and multiplayer platform. Originally developed by Stardock to succeed Stardock Central, it was purchased by GameStop in March 2011.[2][3]

Impulse facilitates the purchase, download and updating of software.[1] The platform also provides blogging, friends-list, chat, game matchmaking, achievements and ranking to certain games.


en.wikipedia.org...


Xbox Live Arcade (XBLA) is a type of video game download distribution available primarily in a section of the Xbox Live Marketplace, Microsoft's digital distribution network for the Xbox 360, that focuses on smaller downloadable games from both major publishers and independent game developers. Titles range from classic console and arcade video games, to new games designed from the ground up for the service. Games available through the XBLA service range from $5–20 in price, and as of January 18, 2012, there have been 459 Xbox Live Arcade titles released for the Xbox 360.


These platforms have all become major hubs for independent developers to set their own prices and release software.

You can pick up games off of Impulse (I simply refuse to call it "Game Stop" - much to the dismay of their marketing team) for $2-3, depending upon what it is. Some are nice little ten-minute-filler type games (for people who are bored of solitaire and minesweeper). Sometimes you can pick up some classics. I would say that most of their games average about $15-20 when you start getting into what I qualify as a full-scale stand-alone game.

Steam may or may not have better prices - but I simply refuse to put that nonsense on my computer.

Now - you can go completely independent, like the developer of Digitanks; but the advantage of developing and partnering with a distribution platform is the advertising and hosting they provide. I've come across some very fun little games while browsing through Impulse that I never would have found or taken any interest in without the distribution software.

Ultimately - it's your choice. Plenty of people create artwork and post it on DeviantArt (although a lot of that is fan portraits, so they would run into issues if they attempted to sell it) for free. Others host it on sites that award commissions (especially in the case of wall-papers).

A lot of very high quality modifications have come into existence over the years. Legally, these -have- to be free (well, spare for some UT3 stuff). MechWarrior: Living Legends, Red Alert: A Path Beyond... Terabytes of fan-generated content for TES4: Oblivion.....

It's really up to you if you want it to be a free contribution or if you expect it to put food on the table.

I've got a free story I'm writing and 'publishing.' It's a lot of work and requires a considerable amount of time and skill to make it right. I have another story - a "masterpiece" - if I may be so bold. I will be writing that one with the expectation that it pays some of my bills.... and I will seek a reasonable means of making that happen.



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