Commercial Milk - Germophobes Mustn't Click This Link

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posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 12:41 PM
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To each their own I suppose.

However, I hope people come down off some of their hangups on things like this if SHTF one day.
Think consuming "bugs" is bad now, just wait until things go south and the things people will consume then.

Heck, depending on what happens I can where it would be possible for people to be more healthy after SHTF than what they are now.
edit on 20-1-2012 by Skewed because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 12:43 PM
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Wow, okay guess this will never end. If you go around with a microscope analyzing everything you see, almost anything is going to look gross and such. What we fail to understand, is that germs are used by our body to eliminate other germs. If we destroy germs all the time with hand sanitizer, refuse to dring milk because of whatever, your failing to provide your body with the necessary components to fight of disease. I think its a good thing to have it all. Theres no way to destroy all germs in the universe forever, so the best way to defeat them is to just become immune to them. Well we've seriously put a slow down to the evolutionary process on that one. With all the new technology and analyzation, our bodies are becoming more and more dependent on this technology and drugs, rather than itself. This has already been done with religion, to us mentally. Mentally we have become dependent on some outside force (god) to help us rather than ourselves, technology and modern medicine are doing the same thing to us, but physically, and physically we will become dependent on this technology to the point that if you can't pay for it, you just die.....



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 12:58 PM
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Originally posted by andersensrm
Wow, okay guess this will never end. If you go around with a microscope analyzing everything you see, almost anything is going to look gross and such.


Indeed, some things are gross, others beautiful. Some are both.

I was surprised at what I found in the milk though, especially operating under the false assumption that pasteurization "kills all the germs". It also seems to be the most active substance I've seen to date.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 01:00 PM
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Originally posted by Hellhound604
reply to post by traditionaldrummer
 


if you want higher definition, you can also investigate the same technique that amateur astronomers use nowadays, by taking a movie, and stacking the images from the video to give you a single image (works best for non-moving subjects).

I use this software for both astronomy and microscopy :
www.astronomie.be...

and great open-source software for microscopy (can also do image stacking, but not as nice as registax)
www.macbiophotonics.ca... and
rsb.info.nih.gov...



Thank you very much, Hellhound.

I'm looking forward to using the scope to its full potential and had no idea about image stacking and the like. Thanks so much for sharing this with everyone.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 01:04 PM
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Originally posted by traditionaldrummer

Originally posted by andersensrm
Wow, okay guess this will never end. If you go around with a microscope analyzing everything you see, almost anything is going to look gross and such.


Indeed, some things are gross, others beautiful. Some are both.

I was surprised at what I found in the milk though, especially operating under the false assumption that pasteurization "kills all the germs". It also seems to be the most active substance I've seen to date.


erm, am I allowed to tell you that sometimes I ask some (very) good friends for some fecal samples, and other bodily fluids, etc, to look at under my microscopes????? Does that make a pervert of me you think, or just a very weird person?
... and when something goes off in the fridge, it gets moved to my "collection fridge" immediately
edit on 20/1/2012 by Hellhound604 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 01:08 PM
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Originally posted by Hellhound604
erm, am I allowed to tell you that sometimes I ask some (very) good friends for some fecal samples, and other bodily fluids, etc, to look at under my microscopes????? Does that make a pervert of me you think, or just a very weird person?


If you collect those samples by hand, you're probably a pervert. Otherwise you sound like a curious person observing the universe. I do something similar with my wife: make her provide a sample, then I try to guess the source. Oh, what we do for science!



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 01:25 PM
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Originally posted by traditionaldrummer

Originally posted by andersensrm
Wow, okay guess this will never end. If you go around with a microscope analyzing everything you see, almost anything is going to look gross and such.


Indeed, some things are gross, others beautiful. Some are both.

I was surprised at what I found in the milk though, especially operating under the false assumption that pasteurization "kills all the germs". It also seems to be the most active substance I've seen to date.


I think your missing the point, we need the germs, unless you have come up with some kind of way to eliminate germs in the entire universe for all eternity. Otherwise we need them to become immune to them. Go ahead and put distance between yourself and this kind of stuff, but its just going to end up with you sick



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 01:26 PM
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Originally posted by andersensrm

Originally posted by traditionaldrummer

Originally posted by andersensrm
Wow, okay guess this will never end. If you go around with a microscope analyzing everything you see, almost anything is going to look gross and such.


Indeed, some things are gross, others beautiful. Some are both.

I was surprised at what I found in the milk though, especially operating under the false assumption that pasteurization "kills all the germs". It also seems to be the most active substance I've seen to date.


I think your missing the point, we need the germs, unless you have come up with some kind of way to eliminate germs in the entire universe for all eternity. Otherwise we need them to become immune to them. Go ahead and put distance between yourself and this kind of stuff, but its just going to end up with you sick



.......or dead.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 01:29 PM
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Originally posted by andersensrm
I think your missing the point, we need the germs, unless you have come up with some kind of way to eliminate germs in the entire universe for all eternity. Otherwise we need them to become immune to them. Go ahead and put distance between yourself and this kind of stuff, but its just going to end up with you sick


Indeed, we have a symbiotic and mutually beneficial relationship with all kinds of microbes. I am not germophobic. I was, however, quite taken aback by the ferocious amount of bacterial activity present in the drop of milk.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 01:32 PM
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Are you serious
DDDD

Some 60-80% of your body mass is made out of bacteria. Better take some hardcore antibiotics then if you want to get a good diet going on


The germ-o-phobic attitude that has been going on for some years is disturbing. I remember some 5-10 years back when i was a kid and the antibacterial dish washing soaps came to market. They were quickly dismissed (at least over here). So now start to dismiss MILK? The stuff babies of many species rely on because they need to grow and get strong ?!

And you say it is harmful for an adult, when a kids life depends on it? Come on!



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 01:34 PM
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Originally posted by traditionaldrummer

Originally posted by JustSlowlyBackAway
reply to post by traditionaldrummer
 

I've been trying to think of good reasons to give up dairy. I love it. But you may have just done the trick.


Apparently it's safe to consume though, as my wife drank some of it even after viewing this video. Her health is fine. I couldn't think of drinking it though.

I had assumed the layman's lore that pasteurization "kills the bacteria". But as I said before, I have an extremely limited understanding of microbiology. Oh well, ya' learn something new every day.


ironic since were are not one organism as much as we are a collective of trillions of organisms rolled into a body.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 01:45 PM
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Originally posted by varikonniemi
Are you serious
DDDD

Some 60-80% of your body mass is made out of bacteria. Better take some hardcore antibiotics then if you want to get a good diet going on


The germ-o-phobic attitude that has been going on for some years is disturbing. I remember some 5-10 years back when i was a kid and the antibacterial dish washing soaps came to market. They were quickly dismissed (at least over here). So now start to dismiss MILK? The stuff babies of many species rely on because they need to grow and get strong ?!

And you say it is harmful for an adult, when a kids life depends on it? Come on!


I agree, but what do you do, were all turning into a bunch of p*s*y* 's



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 02:05 PM
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Originally posted by varikonniemi

And you say it is harmful for an adult, when a kids life depends on it? Come on!


Who said any such thing?

I was simply surprised to find so much activity in fresh milk.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 03:27 PM
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Op, and all posters sofar:
These are not germs, these are the tiny fatty globules in the milk.
The movement you see is not germ movement, it is the Brownian movement and just temperature dependent.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 03:38 PM
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Originally posted by Pokoia
Op, and all posters sofar:
These are not germs, these are the tiny fatty globules in the milk.
The movement you see is not germ movement, it is the Brownian movement and just temperature dependent.


I had considered that this could be Brownian motion of particles, however, a similar sample of heavy whipping cream (with much higher fat content) did not reveal similar behavior from its fats. Either way, milk seems more unappetizing to me.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 04:01 PM
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Originally posted by traditionaldrummer

Originally posted by Pokoia
Op, and all posters sofar:
These are not germs, these are the tiny fatty globules in the milk.
The movement you see is not germ movement, it is the Brownian movement and just temperature dependent.


I had considered that this could be Brownian motion of particles, however, a similar sample of heavy whipping cream (with much higher fat content) did not reveal similar behavior from its fats. Either way, milk seems more unappetizing to me.


Heavy whipping cream is Heavy and as such the Brownian movement will not be so visible as in milk that is a thin fluid with emulgated small vesicles of fat in it.
I did research on cow and pigs manure for more than a year, with a lot of microscopic work in that period.
I can assure you that is really lively!!



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 04:51 PM
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Originally posted by Pokoia
Heavy whipping cream is Heavy and as such the Brownian movement will not be so visible as in milk that is a thin fluid with emulgated small vesicles of fat in it.
I did research on cow and pigs manure for more than a year, with a lot of microscopic work in that period.
I can assure you that is really lively!!


Interesting! Thanks for the info!

I had originally discounted the idea of Brownian motion. I didn't realize milk fat would exhibit it, also I've witnessed other known bacteria behaving similarly. Thanks so much.... perhaps I can drink milk once again!

P.S.: aren't you the guy that figured out how to run his oil for very high lengths of time? I'm the guy that works in the oil lab. I'd love to get a sample of your used oil potion -wink-wink-



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 05:04 PM
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reply to post by Pokoia
 


Yes, I do agree with you, but hey, it is nice watching all sorts of moving things under the microscope (darkfield is the best to watch weird things, have you looked at fresh blood in darkfield?
.) .... but I think the OP's main point was the wonder in it. Isn't that what science is all about? First observing things, and then analyzing what we observe, and starting to ask questions, and finally getting answers, and then refining our questions. So what if our first hypothesis are wrong and it is not bacteria, but only Brownian motion???? Sometimes that really freaks me out.... I try to teach kids about science (though I am not a professional teacher), and for me the greatest thing I could teach a kid, is to ask a single question when I try to explain something to them, and I get the "Why?" question. Once a kid or an adult that is interested in that subject, has learnt to question you, by asking "Why?", my work is finished. I have taught them to start asking questions, observing, learning, and for me that is what life is about.
Sure, you could jump to false conclusions, but you quickly realize that, when some other person ask you "WHY do you say that?".

Sorry, I tend to go into lecture modes a lot (at least that is what my friends tell me)... but if you just start looking at things through a microscope, or a telescope, or build your first electronic circuit, or write your first software, that is the last thing that you should do... criticizing them. Rather show them more wonders of the new world that they are discovering, showing them more wonderful things, and they will learn.

I didn't get the OP's thread to be an invitation to a scientific debate, but rather that he/she saw something interesting under his/her microscope, and instead of p*ssing on his batteries (guess that is a local expression), steer him deeper into the field, where he/she will learn more and more, just offering guidance. Eventually he/she will learn more and more, and start asking the "Why?" question.
edit on 20/1/2012 by Hellhound604 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 21 2012 @ 04:07 AM
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I agree with Pokoia in regard to the Brownian Motion explanation.

Wet mounts are kind of prone to having various issues and being harder to see. I'd suggest some staining if you really want to see some cool stuff!

Gram staining probably being among the more interesting and fairly easy to do. Google will be your friend in that direction.

And Hellhound604's totally right about darkfield, ESPECIALLY if you want to stick to the wet mounts.

But most of all, enjoy that amateur microbiology!!!



posted on Jan, 21 2012 @ 06:21 AM
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reply to post by Microbiologist
 


the problem with staining is that you have to spend a lot more time preparing slides. Sort of take the fun out of the microscopy. I have a phase-microscope and use staining mainly to identify gram-positive bacteria. It is amazing how far. you can get without staining once you start playing with oblique lightning.





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