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Life Spotted on Venus - Russian Scientist

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posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 04:46 PM
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reply to post by Blue Shift
 


How have we looked? Geez, we've sent a couple of probes to a couple of planets and moons, landed on one moon, I'd hardly call that an extensive search would you?
edit on 20-1-2012 by AmatuerSkyWatcher because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 04:48 PM
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Originally posted by Blue Shift

Originally posted by AwakeinNM
I personally believe that life is the RULE rather than the EXCEPTION, and I'd wager that we'll find life just about everywhere we look, once we have the technology to do so.

We've looked in a number of different places, and already on a few different planets, and so far life or something like it has only really been confirmed to exist on Earth. And even through we're slopping over with it in every nook and cranny, we have no idea how it either arose here or got here. Maybe there is life out there somewhere. But the universe is really big and hostile, and so far life has proven to be pretty rare anywhere but Earth.


I'm not saying life is going to exist absolutely everywhere, but a lot more places than scientists are willing to consider. Besides, when you say we've "looked" - we have only looked from afar and looked for 'signs' of life which may be much different from or much more subtle than the signs we see on earth.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 04:50 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 



Try another answer


Okay, you got me. I've obviously been shooting from my hip on this one. As you probably already knew, the "lens caps" were semi-cylindrical to begin with:



www.mentallandscape.com...

My bad.

edit on 20-1-2012 by DJW001 because: (no reason given)

edit on 20-1-2012 by DJW001 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 04:55 PM
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Having looked at the pictures, I'd say that was a part from the lander, nothing more. I'm not recanting my earlier assertions, though.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 04:56 PM
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reply to post by DJW001
 


To be fair, they look nothing like what we see in those pictures. I still think what we are looking at is still something from the probe though.

I am still at a loss of why this seemingly educated man would say different though. Just weird.
edit on 20-1-2012 by AmatuerSkyWatcher because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 05:00 PM
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Originally posted by AmatuerSkyWatcher
How have we looked? Geez, we've sent a couple of probes to a couple of planets and moons, landed on one moon, I'd hardly call that an extensive search would you?

Yeah, but consider Earth. If you were to drop down in a spaceship looking for life, how long would it take to find it? Exactly. About two seconds. In fact, you'd know it was there before you even arrived by looking at the atmosphere.

That's the thing about life. It spreads. It gets all over everything. Now maybe we'll find life on Mars if we dig down deep enough into the ground, or whatever. But most folks here have been going on about how resilient and adaptable life is. Okay, I agree. I give life more credit than most people here. So if you land on something, take a few samples or photos, if life was there, don't you think it would be relatively obvious right away? I do.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 05:03 PM
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Originally posted by AwakeinNM
I'm not saying life is going to exist absolutely everywhere, but a lot more places than scientists are willing to consider. Besides, when you say we've "looked" - we have only looked from afar and looked for 'signs' of life which may be much different from or much more subtle than the signs we see on earth.

Well, like I said. Given that life is so enthusiastic, you'd expect it to be a lot more obvious. It wouldn't be necessary to carve open a bunch of old dead rocks to find it. It would be right in your face.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 05:03 PM
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reply to post by Blue Shift
 


If we sent a probe to earth, and it landed in the middle of the sahara, how long would it take our probe to find life?

Nobody said anything about life being in such abundance as it is on Earth. But we haven't exactly done an extensive search of any planet or moon, so who's to know.


Try thinking outside the box, and not influencing your thoughts on preconcieved ideas of what you think should and should not be.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 05:04 PM
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Originally posted by AmatuerSkyWatcher
How have we looked? Geez, we've sent a couple of probes to a couple of planets and moons, landed on one moon, I'd hardly call that an extensive search would you?
edit on 20-1-2012 by AmatuerSkyWatcher because: (no reason given)


Maybe that life the Russians found made these tracks



P38281 - Atla Region on Venus - 06/27/91

edit on 20-1-2012 by zorgon because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 05:04 PM
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Kinda looks like a crab it has the shadows and everything.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 05:08 PM
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reply to post by AmatuerSkyWatcher
 



To be fair, they look nothing like what we see in those pictures. I still think what we are looking at is still something from the probe though.




That's the curved bit that falls off. The actual imaging system has a mirror that scans in an arc. It is presumably protected by a thick, curved piece of quartz. But if you want to believe it's a fabled Venusian Sand Shrimp, feel free.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 05:10 PM
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It's definitely part of the probe. And Murphy's law came into play as well:


The Venera 14 craft had the misfortune of ejecting the camera lens cap directly under the surface compressibility tester arm, and returned information for the compressibility of the lens cap rather than the surface.


en.wikipedia.org...

The probes only survived a couple of hours, still quite a feat considering on Venus it's hot enough to melt lead, crush you with 93 times Earth's air pressure or 1,300 lbs per square inch and rains sulfuric acid.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 05:12 PM
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Originally posted by AmatuerSkyWatcher
Here is a blown up view of the interesting object, taken from the site kindly linked to by Devino.

The image on the left is the image provided by the raw data from the soviet mission, the image on the right is the reconstructed image from the guy on the website, using 3 different signals transmitted by the probe:






Certainly very interesting looking! The object seems to be elevated from the ground, by what appear to be legs of some sort. I am not saying they are legs of course, just saying they appear to be!

Remember, the website linked above by Devino does not, I repeat does not, mention anything what-so-ever, about any lifeforms of any kind. Weird coincidence? Who knows!


Come on folks, where are these other images (flap and scorpion)? It's not like ATS to be dragging it's feet on such issues!
edit on 20-1-2012 by AmatuerSkyWatcher because: (no reason given)


This is actually a giant Perogie that they used to entice the creatures to get closer to the camera.
www.recipesbymom.net...

No, but seriously. I am very interested in where this thread is going and will be keeping an eye on it. We don't know as much as we think we do and I would love it if we learned that life exists on Venus.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 05:12 PM
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reply to post by NowanKenubi
 

the piece i pointed out is just a wild guess really. I m wondering if the extreme pressure could deform the metal, in which case it might move around on its own as it changes shape, perhaps with regard to the cap idea as well.
Lens cap certainly seems like the most likely culprit; in the corrected images it seems to have some depth, possibly conical, though the bolts (for lack of a better term) sticking out are puzzling. I find myself wondering what mechanism was used to remove the cap remotely - did it for instance unscrew itself ?



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 05:14 PM
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reply to post by DJW001
 


Perhaps you should read what I wrote again. I said I thought it was a part of the probe. It still looks nothing like the pics (even with your nice red, squiggly line).

Try not being so rude and angry. It really is unbecoming you know!?
edit on 20-1-2012 by AmatuerSkyWatcher because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 05:14 PM
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This story fails the "Internet Hoax Rules" I use to determine if I will bother reading a whole thread. The rule it broke was being of Russian origin.

Will be a definite Hoax for sure and I never read the content.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 05:19 PM
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reply to post by AmatuerSkyWatcher
 



Perhaps you should read what I wrote again. I said I thought it was a part of the probe. It still looks nothing like the pics (even with your nice red, squiggly line).

Try not being so rude and angry. It really is unbecoming you know!?]


I'm sorry if I came across as rude and angry. The Venusian Sand Shrimp remark was not addressed to you. We are in agreement that it is a part of the probe; my crude outline was designed to indicate that the "lens cap" was shaped like a truncated half-cone, and matches the shape of the object in question.
edit on 20-1-2012 by DJW001 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 05:26 PM
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reply to post by DJW001
 


Perhaps. There are still some irregularities though, that I don't think are consistent with a lense cap.


Anyway, these are just symantics. The real question still to be addressed, is why this object, seemingly a part of the probe to any layman, should be construed as anything but by a well educated and influential member of the 'Space Research Institute' of Russia?

Where are these other pics? Is this an elaborate hoax, fooling the Russian media? Has anyone else found any other credible sources for this story?



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 05:38 PM
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reply to post by AmatuerSkyWatcher
 



Anyway, these are just symantics. The real question still to be addressed, is why this object, seemingly a part of the probe to any layman, should be construed as anything but by a well educated and influential member of the 'Space Research Institute' of Russia?


Agreed.


Where are these other pics? Is this an elaborate hoax, fooling the Russian media? Has anyone else found any other credible sources for this story?


RIA-Novosti is a reliable agency. Leonid Ksanfomaliti is a real space scientist, but he seems to have some rather odd ideas in his dotage. He may be looking for publicity, or he may be suffering from dementia praecox.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 05:41 PM
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Originally posted by Blue Shift

Originally posted by AwakeinNM
I personally believe that life is the RULE rather than the EXCEPTION, and I'd wager that we'll find life just about everywhere we look, once we have the technology to do so.

We've looked in a number of different places, and already on a few different planets, and so far life or something like it has only really been confirmed to exist on Earth. And even through we're slopping over with it in every nook and cranny, we have no idea how it either arose here or got here. Maybe there is life out there somewhere. But the universe is really big and hostile, and so far life has proven to be pretty rare anywhere but Earth.



'I have a house, i stepped into the garden,i saw no humans....i am alone'

That basically is your reasoning.



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