It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Russian Scientists Mock U.S. Radar Theory on Mars Probe

page: 1
9

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 19 2012 @ 06:17 PM
link   
Well...


So much for WW-III. I know many here will either dismiss this report and some will feel vindicated over this announcement. Either way, I thought it was worth posting



Take it for what it's worth.

Russian Scientists Mock U.S. Radar Theory on Mars Probe


The theory that Russia’s Mars mission failed due to emissions from a U.S. radar is extremely “exotic,” Russian scientists said on Tuesday.

Phobos-Grunt, Russia's most ambitious planetary mission in decades, was launched on November 9 but it was lost due to a propulsion failure and fell back to Earth on Sunday. Soon after the failed launch, the Russian space agency Roscosmos said a rocket motor should have started up to push the probe into higher orbit, but it failed to fire for unknown reasons.

The crash could have been caused by a powerful electromagnetic emission from a U.S. radar in the Pacific Ocean, which could have interfered with the probe's electronics, Kommersant daily reported earlier on Tuesday citing an unnamed source in the Russian space industry. The source stressed that it was more likely an accident rather than an act of sabotage.




posted on Jan, 19 2012 @ 06:27 PM
link   
inb4 HAARP ( that particular array is -near- the pacific.)

2nd line.
edit on 19/1/2012 by whatsinaname because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 19 2012 @ 06:36 PM
link   
In a way, I feel bad for the Russian space folks. We've ALL lost prime spacecraft going to Mars. It is, undoubtedly, embarrassing. But...

... here we are with a respected space-faring nation suggesting that its failure is due to another nation's radar emissions?

On the surface, it looks like a way to pass the buck. Nobody blamed the Ruskies for Apollo 1, or Challenger, or Columbia... or for the multiple losses of American spacecraft going to Mars that never made it.

Russia got to space first with Sputnik. Was that because the US did NOT point a ray gun at them?

There has to be responsibility on the launching end of these missions. NASA will tell you it ain't no fun and it will cause funding to dry up... but... you can't call down the Mothman when you fail.



posted on Jan, 19 2012 @ 06:39 PM
link   
reply to post by SLAYER69
 



Phobos-Grunt, Russia's most ambitious planetary mission in decades, was launched on November 9 but it was lost due to a propulsion failure and fell back to Earth on Sunday. Soon after the failed launch, the Russian space agency Roscosmos said a rocket motor should have started up to push the probe into higher orbit, but it failed to fire for unknown reasons.


Looks like human failure that is given the denial treatment.


The source stressed that it was more likely an accident rather than an act of sabotage.


Yup...looks like it.


He suggested the theory was just a blind to cover up some people’s mistakes.


Yup...sure looks like it.


According to NASA, Russia has failed in all 17 of its attempts to study the Red Planet close-up since 1960. The most recent failure before November 2011 occurred in 1996, when Russia lost its Mars-96 orbiter during launch.


I will not rule this out though...

Consider the power of the impact. I don’t think the Americans have radars capable of ensuring such power at such an altitude [about 200 kilometers],” said Alexander Zakharov of the Russian Academy of Sciences Space Research Institute, where the Phobos equipment and research program were developed.


My source...www.abovetopsecret.com...






posted on Jan, 19 2012 @ 06:56 PM
link   
reply to post by SLAYER69
 

The ruskies might mock our "Radar", but everyone knows that OUR Radar kicks butt!
This guy could single handedly take down an entire country, or get you 200lbs of bacon!
GO IOWA!


For the younger folks here... google MASH

edit on 19-1-2012 by tvtexan because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 19 2012 @ 07:16 PM
link   
reply to post by DrumsRfun
 


Here is one from a while back before the latest run on the story


Russia says foreign power may have caused spy satellite loss

From: Moscow (AFP) Feb 14, 2011

The Russian space agency suggested Monday that a foreign power may have been behind the space accident that disabled one of the country's most modern military satellites earlier this month.

Russia on February 1 launched a high-tech Geo-IK-2 craft to help the military draw a three-dimensional map of the Earth and locate the precise positions of various targets.

News reports said the satellite was a vital part of Russia's effort to match the United States and NATO's ability to target its missiles from space.

But the craft briefly went missing after its launch only to re-emerge in a wrong orbit that left the craft unable to complete its assigned task.



posted on Jan, 19 2012 @ 07:41 PM
link   

edit on 19-1-2012 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 19 2012 @ 07:50 PM
link   
I used to be an engineer on RADAR when I was in the Air Force and I must admit that when I saw this theory I knew straight away that it was just not possible. I mean they are claiming that it was affected in its second stage of orbit. Attenuation on RF signals in the earths atmosphere is pretty high and it is also expedential. Iy you were to point a directional beam RADAR to the sky even using a Dish with a gain of 60dBi and outputting 1 MegaWatt of energy from your amplifiers, I predict you would still only get maybe 500 milliwats of Energy at the peak in the upper atmosphere. 500 milliwats of energy could not even light a bulb, nevermind taking down a sheilded probe.

The story was just proposterous right from the outset.



posted on Jan, 19 2012 @ 08:07 PM
link   
reply to post by michael1983l
 




I appreciate the feed back and details.
That's one in the vindication column.



posted on Jan, 19 2012 @ 08:40 PM
link   
This story reminds me just how much farther we have to go in space exploration.



posted on Jan, 19 2012 @ 10:15 PM
link   
reply to post by Cosmic911
 


Would you mind elaborating on what you mean please?

Sounds interesting.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 04:37 PM
link   
Mars is under the protection of something!

Wrong measurements, mysterious failures... we need to get Chris Hason on this now that he'll need something to do since he was caught cheating on his spouse much the way he caught all those "predators". It'll give him a purpose, we'll find out something great, and maybe we'll be rid of him if he finds something and he's rubbed out to keep him silent!


Derek



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 04:46 PM
link   
Thanks for the info. At least the Russians have enough integrity to admit it was their problem and not some cloak and dagger stuff. Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.

Maybe the Cold War is really over. Someone tell the Pentagon.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 06:10 PM
link   

Originally posted by whatsinaname
inb4 HAARP ( that particular array is -near- the pacific.)

2nd line.
edit on 19/1/2012 by whatsinaname because: (no reason given)


How would haarp prevent a booster from starting? The sattelite wasnt shut down, a booster did not start or am I mistaken?



posted on Jan, 21 2012 @ 03:41 AM
link   
reply to post by SLAYER69
 


It may be difficult to articulate this post for me because I do not understand a great deal about radar but I meant that if some of our most sophisticated space-faring equipment can be devasted by things like radar unintentionally (or intentionally :puz
, or other devices and what not, then we still have a long way to go to understanding these principles before space exploration really becomes routine and safe.

Does that make sense? I know I this thought isn't completely organized yet but I'm still contemplating it.



new topics

top topics



 
9

log in

join