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Dwarf Galaxies may be Overwhelmingly Dark Matter.

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posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 05:30 PM
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The light bent by a dark-matter-dominated galaxy can form what is known as an "Einstein ring"


Astronomers have discovered a Dwarf Galaxy 10 billion light-years away which they believe may contain mostly Dark Matter .

The dwarf was found using a technique called gravitational lensing. It is only the second dark dwarf ever seen, and it is by far the most distant.
The fact that so few dwarf galaxies are seen in our own cosmic neighbourhood has remained a conundrum in astronomy.
The study in Nature could explain it: they may be overwhelmingly dark matter.
Dwarf galaxies often occur in the periphery of larger galaxies, where they are known as satellites - the Milky Way may have many as well.


The galaxy is a satellite to a much larger galaxy and could be one of thousands , the Milky Way is believed to have only 30 satellites but there may be more .

They found a discrepancy in comparing with the image that their detailed computer model suggested should come from the system.
Something with a mass about 200,000,000 times that of our Sun is in the periphery of the image they see.
Yet that source of mass is not visible in the image of the galaxy itself.
"It's very hard to tell at the moment because the telescopes are just not powerful enough to see such dim galaxies so far away," Dr Vegetti said.


"We were kind of lucky that the first one we looked at also had a satellite," Dr Vegetti said. "If we find other galaxies or satellites, it will tell us whether we need to change the properties of dark matter; if we don't find enough, then dark matter must be different from what we think."
www.bbc.co.uk...

If Dark Matter may be different from what we think how weird could it get , as it stands its in a " different" category all of its own

edit on 18-1-2012 by gortex because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 05:45 PM
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Thank you, very interesting!

Amazing that such a small galaxy can bend so much light with it's massive gravitational pull. This does seem to lend credence to the idea of an unseeable matter. If the galaxy is so small, why does it have such huge density?



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 05:55 PM
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reply to post by nightbringr
 





If the galaxy is so small, why does it have such huge density?

Exactly , I must admit I was a bit of a Dark matter skeptic but am slowly coming round to the idea , the whole " there's this stuff that we can't see or measure and it makes up 80% of the Universe " theory just seemed like an easy fix , then they threw in Dark energy to make up for the other missing bits and that made me more skeptical , but as I said over the last year or so I started coming round to the idea



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 06:03 PM
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reply to post by gortex
 


Yeah I read about this a littler earlier, very cool!

But I'm so confused. I try to keep up with it, but I guess i don't fully grasp the concept of dark matter. So if this galaxy is composed of dark matter, is it still like a physical place? Like could we go there and see/interact/collide! with actual objects such as stars and planets that just don't reflect light?



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 06:14 PM
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reply to post by Rexamus
 





i don't fully grasp the concept of dark matter.

To be honest I'm not sure anyone fully grasps the nature of dark matter due to the fact we can't see or detect it , just its effect is the clue to its existence .
I would imagine that of there are Stars hiding in there you could go into it but I have no idea what the effect would be .
I'm not an expert and I may be wrong , but what I do know is its strange stuff


Some interesting reading on what Dark Matter may be .

But there are many other ideas for dark matter particles besides the supersymmetric particles. Some theorists favour a type of very light particle called axion. Others suspect that the particles could be a billion times heavier than the predicted supersymmetric particles, in which case there would be a billion times fewer of them, making detection even harder. Or they could be even more exotic still — for instance atom-sized black holes made in the ultra-high pressures of the early Universe.
plus.maths.org...

edit on 18-1-2012 by gortex because: Edit to add



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 06:34 PM
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reply to post by gortex
 


hmmm yess very strange indeed!



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 11:33 AM
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reply to post by nightbringr
 


reply to post by gortex
 


I'm betting dollars to donuts the dark matter is where some of the UFOs come from.

The biggest clue by far is that we can infer that "something" is there and that it does not reflect light. In a normal atom you have the bulk "orbited" by electron(s). When a photon interacts with the atom the electron jumps to a higher energy state and we say that the atom is excited. As the excited moves back down to it's original level the electron loses energy. The energy lost is given off in the form of electromagnetic radiation. The atom emits light due to this process.

In order for this process not to happen the electron would have to stay excited and not return to it's lower energy state and hence not give off (a frequency that we can detect). Due to the mass-energy equivalence (E=MC2) principle we realize that the charge of the electron is proportional to the charge of the proton. Therefore an electron that stays excited (perhaps just a higher ground state?) must be associated with a proton of higher mass/energy. "Dark atoms" for this reason have more mass/energy than the stuff we are familiar with.

PS- I'm just babbling but I really think mankind is close to discovering some big things in the lifetime of generation x and probably the baby boomers as well.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 12:06 PM
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reply to post by gortex
 

One measly, highly speculative galaxy as proof of dark matter?
Come on, you cant be that gullible.
For all I know it could be a clocked galaxy, some kind of alien tech.
This is very speculative and flimsy evidence for the missig 70%.



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 12:30 PM
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I am not seeing the evidence for dwarf galaxy or "gravitational lensing" or "dark matter". It looks like simple Birkeland currents. If we could look at this formation from the side(90 degrees along the x-axis from our perspective), we'd probably see something more like the "Ant Nebula" seen here: hs-2001-05-a-full_jpg



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 12:35 PM
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reply to post by BBalazs
 





One measly, highly speculative galaxy as proof of dark matter?

The clue's in the title ,Dwarf Galaxies , and no its not proof of anything , but it may be another piece of the puzzle .



Come on, you cant be that gullible.

Maybe I can




For all I know it could be a clocked galaxy

What's a clocked Galaxy ?



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 12:43 PM
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reply to post by gortex
 

Cloacked.
Hidden.
Anyway, i am not seaking answers from you, just speculating on the article.
On a brighther side, its a first step.
You found a black energy galaxy. Good, now find the other 70% that just doesnt seem to exist, but can always be conviniently blamed on dark energy vortexes or whatever. Find somethin special, not up for debate.



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