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Begin Sex Ed in Kindergarten, Says New ‘National Standards’ Report

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posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 11:13 AM
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Childrens books across Europe are being changed to remove references to gender and heterosexuality and to replace them with genderless and homosexual characters for "equality". I have nothing against homosexuals, transgenders and genderless people but I fail to see how taking the preferences of 1% of society and portraying them as the preferences of 50% is going to prepare children for real life.




posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 11:20 AM
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Originally posted by lucid eyes
Childrens books across Europe are being changed to remove references to gender and heterosexuality and to replace them with genderless and homosexual characters for "equality". I have nothing against homosexuals, transgenders and genderless people but I fail to see how taking the preferences of 1% of society and portraying them as the preferences of 50% is going to prepare children for real life.


We have heard people sensationalize the European system.

Why change a good system ?

Hmmm.

The agendas are worldwide.

They want money and power, not social perfection.

I wonder what that's all about?



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 11:21 AM
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reply to post by xuenchen
 


The statistics counter your claim that the majority of Americans are doing just fine.

Why is America one of the WORST on the planet in regards to sex crimes per capita?
It's almost like all those parents that are doing 'just fine' as you claim are, if anything, teaching their kids that a woman is just asking for it if she dresses provacatively, it's okay to bash gays or treat them like something lesser, when a girl says no it really just means try harder, it's okay to physically abuse someone if you've been in a relationship with them a long time because they now belong to you, psychological abuse is fine because nothing violent has actually happened.

No.
'Normal' Americans are NOT doing 'just fine'.

Compared to the rest of the planet, we're not much better than those repressive nations that force women to wear burkas.

America has one of the highest per capita in rape, and abuse statistics. Someone is dropping the ball somewhere, and I know for sure the current standards for sex education is partially at fault. That leaves the parents to take up the slack, and if parents were doing as fine as you say, then, statistics would be different.
They are, however not.



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 11:29 AM
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reply to post by nineix
 


The Majority are doing just fine without help.

There are 320,000,000 Americans in the U.S.

A small percentage does not make up the whole country.

I'm not comparing Americans to any other nation.

The OP article isn't either.

Violent crime stats are not a reflection of sex ed failure and sex ed agendas.



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 11:30 AM
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I think kindergarden is too early for sex education-and there's been sex education in schools for years and guess what? We still have all these girls getting pregnant and kids passing around STD's so it obviously doesnt work. Planned Parenthood is one of the worst things to ever happen to this country. Parents need to teach their children sex education not the schools. Thats the problem-parents leave it up to the schools who teach the mechanics of sex but impart no values to it so these kids think its ok to have sex. Its time we started teaching them that it isnt ok and that we will not tolerate young girls having babies.



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 11:36 AM
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Originally posted by Skewed

Originally posted by KaiserSoze
The poor teacher takes the blame for a lot that is out of their control. Is it the teacher's fault that my niece is behind a lot of her class? I say no. Is it my daughter's fault that she has to sit idle in class while the teacher attempts to bring the other kids "up to speed"? Again, no. I'm not saying I did something special, just what I should have done and probably not enough at that. When parents fail to do their job it not only hurts their kids, it hurts the other kids who get bored waiting while the other kids try to catch up. It also hurts the teacher who looks bad by no fault of their own when the students take the standardized tests and perform poorly.


Interesting point. I see what you are saying but...what about the kids that are "above" their class and the work is simply too easy for them. The kid gets bored, he/she is not getting attention that the other kids are that may be struggling(looking at it from the point of view of the kid). This bored kid then has pent up energy that has to be released and the kid does so by acting out. The kid gets in trouble and has to go to the office. The office deals out some form of punishment, but the problem is not fixed. The kid is still bored. How come no one looks at the situation and sees that the kid only needs a challenge to fix the discipline problems. How come these kids are not empowered to excel at things instead of holding them back. If 2nd grade work is too easy for the kid then why not see if the kid can do 3rd grade work.
edit on 18-1-2012 by Skewed because: (no reason given)


You are correct that they get bored, often having a higher dropout rate than the kids who struggle to catch up. Fortunately we have had zero discipline problems, but I do know some of her classmates get bored and act out.My daughter tests at the 7th-8th grade level in everything and is in a gifted class 1 day a week and it helps a lot. She has studied Greek and Latin, last quarter she studied chemistry and pretty well has the periodic table memorized. They cram a lot into that 1 day, unfortunately for every $10 they spend on remedial help for kids that are way behind they spent $1 on the gifted program in our district.



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 11:38 AM
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Originally posted by wildtimes
Yup, that's my thinking, too. If the child asks, tell them what they want to know. Just tailor your response to their level of comprehension.

One of my former neighbors was looking after her grandson while his mother gave birth to a new sibling, and the grandma told me when he asked where the baby would come out, she told him, "Out of mommy's foot." She was proud of this.

Seriously.

It is the parents' responsibility, but like you say, so many just hide from it out of some outdated, obsolete, unnecessary sense of shame or taboo.


I don't disagree. This type of thing is not a small percentage either. I literally never got any kind of sex education from my parents. Not one word until I was 16 when my father tried before I told him I had already learned about it in school. My parents aren't even overly religious or prude either.


Perhaps a better strategy would be to make expectant PARENTS take classes, and teach THEM how to do this, rather than just looking the other way when this nonsense is taught to youngsters and hoping the teacher will do it for them. Actually, I would not be opposed to people needing a license or certificate attesting to competency before being allowed to parent without supervision. I know this sounds like fascist intrusion and invasion of privacy, but perhaps it would serve to ameliorate some of the social issues we have, and proactively prevent all the fires we are now racing around throwing water on....children killed, missing, raped, abused, sold, neglected, imprisoned, left to fend for themselves on the streets. It really does take a community, people, to raise a child. Let's all get on the same page.
*steps off of soapbox*



Perhaps, but mandating that sort of thing doesn't seem like it would do much good. You don't change culture with parents, but with children. If we want to change the dialog of our country it's best to start with the children and, like alcohol, keep an open education and dialog about these topics.



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 11:44 AM
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The poor teacher takes the blame for a lot that is out of their control. Is it the teacher's fault that my niece is behind a lot of her class? I say no. Is it my daughter's fault that she has to sit idle in class while the teacher attempts to bring the other kids "up to speed"? Again, no. I'm not saying I did something special, just what I should have done and probably not enough at that. When parents fail to do their job it not only hurts their kids, it hurts the other kids who get bored waiting while the other kids try to catch up. It also hurts the teacher who looks bad by no fault of their own when the students take the standardized tests and perform poorly.

And in your opinion, how do you think the Girl will view Her "parents" when She figures it all out ?


This is the 4th child, one has really applied himself and done very well. The oldest girl dropped out of school pregnant and now has 2 kids and can't keep a job for any length of time, the next younger boy goes into the Army in 3 weeks and as lazy as he is basic training should be a pretty steep learning curve. Basically, they have all pretty much been on their own until entering school and letting them teach the kids everything. I hope the youngest does figure it all out and doesn't follow in her older sister's footsteps.



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 11:45 AM
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Originally posted by Sunsetspawn
I'm not saying that they need to learn about the acts of gay sex at 5, but they need to know what "gay" is.


I think kids should be taught that each person is different. That each brain is different. We are all unique as ourselves.

Then teach the way each body and brain is made will affect how a person is attracted to certain things. Such as Art - Sports - Music - etc.

Then teach these same body/brain components also affect why you are attracted to some people and want that person to be your friend.

This would be an introduction to understanding and accepting people for who they are and their differences.

It would be an introduction to understanding why you are a certain way is completely normal and natural.
edit on 18-1-2012 by Annee because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 11:48 AM
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Originally posted by xuenchen
reply to post by nineix
 


The Majority are doing just fine without help.

There are 320,000,000 Americans in the U.S.

A small percentage does not make up the whole country.

I'm not comparing Americans to any other nation.

The OP article isn't either.

Violent crime stats are not a reflection of sex ed failure and sex ed agendas.



Actually, violent crime DOES reflect inadequate sexual education.
Comprehensive ongoing sexual education doesn't just teach about sex. Physical sex is actually just a small part of it. the majority of it focuses on interpersonal relations, equal treatment and respect for everyone regardless of gender, communication, appropriate behavior in and out of relationships, that people are not objects.

A girl can't go casually topless in the US at places like beaches, swimming pools, and parks, or other places where it's more than socially acceptable for a man to take his shirt off. Going topless for a girl in America is seen as an advertisement for sex.
This is abhorrent.
Women are still treated as objects in the US, still get unequal pay compared to male counterparts, and are still discriminated against regardless all those 'liberal' reforms that allow women to vote, serve in the armed forces, and work in jobs traditionally held primarily by men.

This social atmosphere ties directly back to sexual education, or more accurately the lack of it in America.



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 11:58 AM
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reply to post by KrazyJethro
 



Perhaps, but mandating that sort of thing doesn't seem like it would do much good. You don't change culture with parents, but with children. If we want to change the dialog of our country it's best to start with the children and, like alcohol, keep an open education and dialog about these topics.


Yes, that is my point. The children need to be taught in a sensible and practical, yet sensitive way. It would only take one generation in a family system....to be educated and coached. Then they would teach their children, and voila. Changed culture.

I'm thinking more of a temporary mandate, to stamp out the ignorance and shame. When my son was born, I was in a teaching hospital, and they brought me a questionnaire during my stay. It asked me questions like "what do you want your child to be when he or she grows up?" (my answer: a happy, well-adjusted, self-aware, contributing member of society). What were they screening for? To find the ones who said "a fireman, or else", or "a rocket scientist and by god nothing will stop me from shoving that agenda onto him"...? I don't know. Now, in retrospect it occurs to me that they might have been helping out a psych research project, or looking for key words to alert them that the new mommy had some unseemly notions...

I went to lamaze classes, and breast-feeding classes, and I took it upon myself to do research, to read, study, apply myself to "best-practice" parenting theory and style issues from early in my first pregnancy, so I already knew what they were getting at.

But sadly, many, many parents have no idea what is about to happen to their lives...and I think it is important for those who are aware of what happens to one's freedoms and independence, and of the challenges a first-time parent will face, and the absolute indisputable priority of parenting as the most important job anyone will EVER have, to be advised of such.

If a new parent's upbringing was lacking in proper sex-ed, that new parent would benefit greatly from such training, and then in turn teach their own children, who would in turn teach the next generation. My parents didn't teach me how to train horses, for example. I learned it from others, and study on my own.

I then taught my kids. It's that simple.

It only takes once, and then the family's future generations will do it as a "standard procedure". It will come naturally. You can't un-know something once you know it. You can ignore it, or bastardize it, and in that case you need correction. I say teach every single new parent the skills they need, in a helpful, supportive way, and then we have a much better foundation from which to work on the lesser fires of our society.

Peace



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 11:59 AM
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reply to post by KaiserSoze
 



You are correct that they get bored, often having a higher dropout rate than the kids who struggle to catch up. Fortunately we have had zero discipline problems, but I do know some of her classmates get bored and act out.My daughter tests at the 7th-8th grade level in everything and is in a gifted class 1 day a week and it helps a lot. She has studied Greek and Latin, last quarter she studied chemistry and pretty well has the periodic table memorized. They cram a lot into that 1 day, [color=gold]unfortunately for every $10 they spend on remedial help for kids that are way behind they spent $1 on the gifted program in our district.


And what do WE as adults learn from that agenda ?

There's more $$$ in it for the pseudo-intellectuals to exploit the system when a lot of "way behind" kids are present.

Not to mention the normal majority of kids.



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 12:02 PM
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reply to post by KrazyJethro
 



I don't disagree. This type of thing is not a small percentage either. I literally never got any kind of sex education from my parents. Not one word until I was 16 when my father tried before I told him I had already learned about it in school. My parents aren't even overly religious or prude either.


In your opinion,

were you a "one of a kind kind" in that regard ?

Or were the majority in the same boat school-wide.



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 12:07 PM
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reply to post by nineix
 



[color=gold]Actually, violent crime DOES reflect inadequate sexual education.
Comprehensive ongoing sexual education doesn't just teach about sex. Physical sex is actually just a small part of it. the majority of it focuses on interpersonal relations, equal treatment and respect for everyone regardless of gender, communication, appropriate behavior in and out of relationships, that people are not objects.

A girl can't go casually topless in the US at places like beaches, swimming pools, and parks, or other places where it's more than socially acceptable for a man to take his shirt off. Going topless for a girl in America is seen as an advertisement for sex.
This is abhorrent.
Women are still treated as objects in the US, still get unequal pay compared to male counterparts, and are still discriminated against regardless all those 'liberal' reforms that allow women to vote, serve in the armed forces, and work in jobs traditionally held primarily by men.

This social atmosphere ties directly back to sexual education, or more accurately the lack of it in America.




According to which experts?

FBI, ???

Please, don't refer to any biased government grant institutions.

How does the current high levels of drug abuse tie into all these wild theories ?


ETA: [color=cyan]The VAST majority does not have these agendaized problems




edit on Jan-18-2012 by xuenchen because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 12:07 PM
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Originally posted by KaiserSoze
...what about the kids that are "above" their class and the work is simply too easy for them. The kid gets bored, he/she is not getting attention that the other kids are that may be struggling(looking at it from the point of view of the kid). This bored kid then has pent up energy that has to be released and the kid does so by acting out.


Yes - I was one of those bored kids. I hated school.

It took me a lifetime to understand - - Public School is a privilege that guarantees every child an education. We are very fortunate to have Public Schools in America.

Public School is not really designed for kids not in the middle group - - although many schools do try.

What a Public School does not provide - - is up to the parent and child to take on that responsibility. If your child is very intelligent - - it is up to you to fill the void Public School can not cover.

I think most Public Schools today have some kind of tutoring available (free or minimal charge). It is up to the parent and child to seek these services out.

People should stop complaining about Public Schools - - and instead volunteer or find other ways to help improve the system. And stop blaming the teachers. As a parent - education is still your responsibility.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

However - - Public Schools being what they are - - - they must try to cover all bases - - - including social awareness and sex education.



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 12:13 PM
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Sex education "should" start at birth and continue through life. Yes children can understand sex education when presented in an age appropriate way.

I've done this with my children and so far things are great for them and they are both very knowledgeable. Quite a number of times they have told me of "things" they have heard from friends they were able to debunk and give actual real information to which most likely helped their friends. If I hadn't educated my children their is no telling how much erroneous information they would have gleamed from their friends that had parents who refused to educate their children.

i grew up in one of those households where my parents didn't want the school educating me, but they sure wouldn't educate me themselves beyond "it's nasty and only do it when married".

As if that told me a darn thing. I learned everything I know about "sex ed" as a teenager and I learned how much was wrong as I got older and educated myself.

Since parents refuse to educate their children, then yes we need to come to consensus and educate our children in school.

If you don't want your children learning about sex, well.... I really don't know what to tell you as they WILL learn, the question is, will they learn about factual information or will they learn the myths which it seems gets promoted by the uneducated.

Sigh... and NO babies do NOT grow inside mommy's "belly", they grow inside mommy's WOMB. You are teaching your children the incorrect words which may confuse them.

How about saying.... inside a woman is something called a womb which when a woman is pregnant keeps the fetus safe, warm, fed and protected.


Originally posted by thisguyrighthere
This would be a non-issue if people didnt feel this floormat compulsion to raise other peoples kids.

Let chlamydia and unwanted pregnancy run rampant. What do I care?
Likewise, if they cant fend for themselves dont do it for them.

Following "natures course" got them there. Let them follow "natures course" to its inevitable end.


Sounds good..... well... except...

Then we get people moaning and groaning
about paying for welfare for all these young children having children.... but then the same people turn around and moan and groan about abortions being legal.

Damned if you do..... damned if you don't...

I say educate from day one with age appropriate language.



Harm None
Peace



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 12:14 PM
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Sex education taught in scientific, biology/chemistry/physiological way that is sexually neutral is fine with me. I want my kids to know about organs, hormones and pelvic bones and how they work to produce life.

Now for parents that do not want their kids being taught this type of reproductive biology, they can opt out and their kids go to study hall or the library. That is fair to everyone in my mind, that is how it works in my kids school and I think that is a happy medium.

But I do not want anyone teaching SEXUALITY to my kid...that is something for my kid to experience and develop on their own, in their own way and at their own time when they are ready....it is a natural process linked with puberty and hormones...it is an intimate part of who we are and has no place in school curiclulum, especially not in elementary school when prepubescent kids do not even have the first blushing of sexual desire.



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 12:21 PM
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Originally posted by Mijamija
. . . . especially not in elementary school when prepubescent kids do not even have the first blushing of sexual desire.



Really?

You weren't shoved into the boys bathroom in third grade? (from a female perspective)



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 12:29 PM
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reply to post by amazed
 



Sigh... and NO babies do NOT grow inside mommy's "belly", they grow inside mommy's WOMB. You are teaching your children the incorrect words which may confuse them.


True that.
And you know who it was who "straightened me out" about how to phrase things?

My son. Not even two years old, and I was driving us all to somewhere (irrelevant), my daughter was 4 at the time. I was talking about when I was pregnant with her and began, "When she was in my tummy--," and my little son, 20 months old, pushed his pacifier into his cheek and asked, from his car-seat, interjecting: "Did you eat her?"

I chuckled, and said "no" and clarified, but he was right!
It was a lame description. I cleared it up right then and there (can't remember if I said uterus, womb, or what). But yeah, even as a toddler he appropriately questioned the message he was receiving.

(He and my daughter are both extremely intelligent and living independently now in their 20s).



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 12:32 PM
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reply to post by xuenchen
 


wow there are a lot of people on here with sexual hangups. American must be the most over sexualised nation on earth and this is what is does to them.
Its sexuality, no big deal it becomes a big deal with you hide it from children and pretend it does not exist...



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