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Yellowstone showing significant activity

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posted on Jan, 16 2012 @ 11:30 AM
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reply to post by Shadowalker
 
..

oh yes the swamp gas cure all .... sheesh... haven't people come to the realization yet that almost all data from the usgs is full off holes and played down numbers...im out here in the nw ringed in by mt. Hood, mt. Saint helens,and Rainier. A month ago i felt a 3.0 or better . USGS said it was 1.7 . I kno what a quake feels like . I went through a bunch summer last in Bay Area Ca..YS is going to blow...calm before the storm perhaps?




posted on Jan, 16 2012 @ 01:24 PM
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reply to post by GoldenRuled
 


The reason Madison river calmed down is because it was never really like Pelican in the first place. If you open up those thumb nails and look closely, you will see there are notable differences. One (peilican) was the equipment, the other (madison) was weather. That is why it has now calmed down.

The reason Madison shows it more than some of the others is because of the sensitivity of the equipment. Look down at the bottom let corner. Madison is like 133 microns....most of those others are are around 1,333. They are much less sensitive, so show less local 'noise'. Those are the ones you want to look to to see if something is seismic. They are much 'cleaner'.


ETA: Talking about the USGS conspiracy in regards to this thread is way off base. The seismograms we are looking at aren't even controlled by the USGS. There is nothing going on there to cover up. Right now.

edit on 16-1-2012 by westcoast because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 16 2012 @ 02:24 PM
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Originally posted by RenegadeScholar
I remember checking the seismo's maybe a month ago, when pelican cove first started showing activity.

Now pelican cove's chart is pretty much blacked out from all the activity, while the increase in activity in the other charts shows that whatever is causing these tremors, it is increasing.

To me, that seems like a massive jump in just a month. Is it normal for month-long build ups like this, that will gradually subside, or is this just the start of the horrifying inevitable? Scary #, glad I live in Aus.

Stay safe


Well Yellowstone is not your fault but according to this Indonesia's is!

PETER OVERTON: So it's Australia's fault?

PROFESSOR IAN PLIMER: Yes, ultimately.

Also you have the same dangers there it seems...
PETER OVERTON: What will the consequences be if Anak Krakatoa — what we're standing on right now — blasts as a super-volcano, for Australia?

PROFESSOR IAN PLIMER: It would put Australia's economy back hundreds of years. We would have famine, we would have darkness. We would have a lot of dust in the atmosphere. We would have spectacular sunsets. We would destroy a lot of the vegetation. We would kill off our fishing grounds. It would have a major economic effect on Australia.

PETER OVERTON: Are we due for one?

PROFESSOR IAN PLIMER: We're due for another one. We're overdue.
sixtyminutes.ninemsn.com.au...



posted on Jan, 16 2012 @ 02:28 PM
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Originally posted by Anmarie96
reply to post by hapablab
 


Pelican cone has a glitch. The rest of the instruments are responding to the winter storm and wind they are experiencing. Link


What kind of "glitch"? This place is pretty important why is it not set up with a new glitch-less one right off? You would certainly think it would.



posted on Jan, 16 2012 @ 02:40 PM
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reply to post by Char-Lee
 


Yes, you would.

We have been having that discussion for over two years now. There are always glitches going on with the equipment. The whole thing needs to be revamped, but that takes money. Unfortunately, we all know where that is at right now.


Part of the problem is the location. This time of year, some of those stations are not even accessible.

If you look at some seismograms, you will see periodically what is called a 're-calibration'. The computer sends out a signal to calibrate the machine. It comes across as a sharp spike that then settles out, back to a flat-line. Pelican pretty much looks like a continuous calibration, meaning the equipment simply isn't working. I wish they would just turn the darned thing off so people wouldn't keep thinking the caldera is erupting.



posted on Jan, 16 2012 @ 03:04 PM
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Originally posted by westcoast
reply to post by Char-Lee
 


Yes, you would.

We have been having that discussion for over two years now. There are always glitches going on with the equipment. The whole thing needs to be revamped, but that takes money. Unfortunately, we all know where that is at right now.


Part of the problem is the location. This time of year, some of those stations are not even accessible.

If you look at some seismograms, you will see periodically what is called a 're-calibration'. The computer sends out a signal to calibrate the machine. It comes across as a sharp spike that then settles out, back to a flat-line. Pelican pretty much looks like a continuous calibration, meaning the equipment simply isn't working. I wish they would just turn the darned thing off so people wouldn't keep thinking the caldera is erupting.


From what I gather the "glitched out ones have been glitch-ing for a long while not just since the weather has turned to winter finally. You and others make the equipment sound like stuff from 1900. I had to calibrate one of the older pieces in college studying Earth Sciences, that is my only experience of it...What may I ask is your expertise in this area of science?

How would someone be so sure that there is not something real happening, maybe something we have not even seen before and it simply looks like the equipment has a "glitch"?

Personally I think there is way more known about Yellowstone then is ever shared with the public and you won't see the more sensitive info online.
edit on 16-1-2012 by Char-Lee because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 16 2012 @ 03:27 PM
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Can someone knowledgeable say with certainty that this is not a harmonic tremor?
isthisthingon.org...



posted on Jan, 16 2012 @ 03:44 PM
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reply to post by westcoast
 


Cheers for that, awesome answer!



posted on Jan, 16 2012 @ 03:45 PM
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I read somewhere a couple months ago that the caldera was filling up with magma again and the ground was rising like 1-2 inches a day in yellowstone. That's bad joo joo.



posted on Jan, 16 2012 @ 03:52 PM
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Originally posted by lonewolf19792000
I read somewhere a couple months ago that the caldera was filling up with magma again and the ground was rising like 1-2 inches a day in yellowstone. That's bad joo joo.


That one was posted on this article:

www.sltrib.com...




By Brian Maffly The Salt Lake Tribune Published November 8, 2007 12:10 pm



Posted: 12:09 PM- The floor of the Yellowstone caldera has risen at a rate faster than has ever been observed before, according to a new study that gives further proof that "ground deformation" at the park resembles the gently heaving chest of a slumbering giant. The likely cause of the uplift is a volcanic intrusion of molten rock that has moved upward 50 to 60 miles and flattened into a pancake the size of Los Angeles a few miles below the surface, according to a study to be published Friday by University of Utah scientists.


I wonder if the scientists have looked at the status of the giant caldera more recently? That was only 5 years ago, so I imagine it hasn't changed much.
edit on 1/16/2012 by InFriNiTee because: removed redundant spaces



posted on Jan, 16 2012 @ 04:29 PM
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Harmonic tremors ?


Graph


sorry Golden didnt see your post, I noticed it too lol
edit on 16-1-2012 by hapablab because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 16 2012 @ 04:41 PM
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Originally posted by GoldenRuled
Can someone knowledgeable say with certainty that this is not a harmonic tremor?
isthisthingon.org...


Can you say with certainty that it is?

The only way to know for sure is to run spectrum on it for frequency content. But that sig is not thick and steady enough to be even in the ballpark. It looks like man made activity to me or even wind noise. Interesting that is not showing up on the BHZ channel at the same station, instead I am seeing what appears to be wind noise on the BHZ channel of LKWY.



posted on Jan, 16 2012 @ 05:25 PM
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reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


I am new here and have loved reading the posts within this thread as a kind of encyclopedia volcanica.

I hope its not too arrogant of me to suggest that perhaps the real issue here is in fact the lack of activity.

Am I correct in the belief that regular movement relieves stress and that this is in fact a good thing for a system such as yellowstone?

The last movement recorded (published) by the USGS for the yellowstone area was five days ago at a mere 0.5.

I feel that given the weather, differences in sensitivity of the various seismometers and their locale with regards to man made activity, it is most likely the case that any anomalous readings are a result of nature (mother or human made).

I am concerned that lack of activity is what should be of concern rather than anomalous readings on various seismometers.

Just my opinion.

Lilly




posted on Jan, 16 2012 @ 05:43 PM
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Originally posted by Char-Lee

How would someone be so sure that there is not something real happening, maybe something we have not even seen before and it simply looks like the equipment has a "glitch"?



Because if there truly was an increase volcanic activity, it would show on many seismometers, if not all of them. The tiltmeters might indicate inflation. The GPS data would show movement. The hydrothermal systems in the park might alter. The whole system of monitoring would show changes if activity were to increase.
And like someone earlier stated, not a whole lot of money is thrown at Department of the Interior agencies like USGS (responsible for volcano hazards monitoring) and the National Park Service.



posted on Jan, 16 2012 @ 06:36 PM
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Originally posted by Olivine

Originally posted by Char-Lee

How would someone be so sure that there is not something real happening, maybe something we have not even seen before and it simply looks like the equipment has a "glitch"?



Because if there truly was an increase volcanic activity, it would show on many seismometers, if not all of them. The tiltmeters might indicate inflation. The GPS data would show movement. The hydrothermal systems in the park might alter. The whole system of monitoring would show changes if activity were to increase.
And like someone earlier stated, not a whole lot of money is thrown at Department of the Interior agencies like USGS (responsible for volcano hazards monitoring) and the National Park Service.


Where is the proof of under funding so that something as important as our super volcano is not properly watched? The parks Dept and Forestry and such have all brand new trucks at all times and many other things that show good funding.
So many people explain things here but do not tell us how they came to be experts on this subject and if they are getting their info from somewhere else where is the source.



posted on Jan, 16 2012 @ 07:01 PM
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Originally posted by Char-Lee
Where is the proof of under funding so that something as important as our super volcano is not properly watched?


I swear I ought to send that classic to JL at the YVO, or Jamie at the UoU. They'd probably frame it, but wouldn't dare put it on the wall!

But I'll bet you the minute anything serious like changing gas emissions or volcanic tremor were to occur, they'd probably have a blank check for whatever they needed.


So many people explain things here but do not tell us how they came to be experts on this subject and if they are getting their info from somewhere else where is the source.


There is not a single resident true technical and seismology degreed expert here as a regular at ATS. But a couple come pretty close. I have no idea why you are assuming any of us are experts. We just read around and learn. The more and the longer you do it, the more you learn, that simple.

And any of the sources we use are available to you too. The YVO is the best place for info on YS. And if you can't find it on their site, email them. They are very friendly and responsive.



posted on Jan, 16 2012 @ 07:13 PM
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reply to post by Char-Lee
 


Hi Char-Lee. I've never professed to being an expert in seismology, vulcanology, or geophysics--it's just something I study obsessively because I enjoy the topics. Money is one concern. In 2009, the budget for the Volcano Hazards Program was $23 million dollars. That includes Alaska, Hawaii, the Cascades, Long Valley and Yellowstone. Source of previous sentence figures

The article goes on to say that other factors limit how quickly scientists can get equipment where they need it, namely permissions and legal issues. Basically red tape because some areas are managed by multiple agencies, and others are in wilderness areas, which require an act of Congress to allow any mechanised or electronic equipment (and we know how fast Congress moves on legislation, lol).

I agree with you, it is nonsensical that we have defective equipment, or in the some cases, like Mt. Shasta, no monitoring equipment near such potentially hazardous areas.

Maybe we should start a letter writing campaign to our representatives to fund these projects?

edit on 1/16/2012 by Olivine because: s p e l l i n g



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