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While on ATS, these are the Chinese IP’s that tried to hack into me

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posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 03:38 PM
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It seems that China is trying to hack into anyone that works in the military. They will hack into Google to get Anyone’s info, just to get access to anyone else that may have secret info. I have a very through security system in place because, well just because I like it that way. I’m able to VPN out to a remote computer and surf safely without someone getting in (except for the NSA, they’re all over the place). The old VPN Firewall router just doesn’t cut it any more. You have to use the recent addition of Extreme Threat Management. Cisco, Sonic Wall, Fortinet…and others, are producing the Gigabit ( 1000 T-Base) speeds that recent motherboards and modems are using. It is important to realize that you get what you pay for. Equally important, go to the manufacturing web sites and read what the contributors, of the support forums are complaining about (Very Important).
Now back to the main point. While logged on here to ATS, I saw some strange IP’s that are attempting to get in. I could have been viewing CNN, Fox, or performing On-Line Banking for this to happen as well. Because of ATS’s policies, I can’t post the IP’s. I chose to edit my original thread, not just because Greeneyedleo said that I should, but it makes since to me now. Having members go to these IP’s would endanger their computer, and in the least, infect them with something.
***.**.**.***came up in my system viewer. Using ipdb.at, I see that this is a Chinese site in Liaoning region, which is in the city of Shenyang.
**.***.***.*** is located in Beijing China ( by using the coordinates, I plugged this into Google Earth and found that it came from a place just north of The Forbidden City, across the street from the Temple of Haven).
***.**.**.*** is located in Shanghai China
***.**.**.*** is found in Qingdao China.
China is attacking the US Internet users, and some don’t even know it.
Because of the nefarious Chinese pingers out there, having a security router is cheap insurance.




posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 03:42 PM
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reply to post by Violater1
 


Is a security router just like a regular router?

How did you notice these IPs attempting to get into your computer? Was it "netstat -p tcp -n" or something in command prompt or something else?
edit on 1/14/2012 by CaticusMaximus because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 03:46 PM
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I saw your original thread and when I clicked on it, got a 404. Glad you made this post!

This is pretty concerning to say the least.



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 03:48 PM
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My malwarebytes keeps going off about blocked attacks, I don't have any secret information what could they want from me?



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 03:50 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 


MOD NOTE:
Permission from Staff was given to him to repost.

Please keep to the topic and the topic only.
edit on January 14th 2012 by greeneyedleo because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 03:53 PM
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reply to post by Mikeyy
 


yeah me too man, I wrote this whole thing and then it was gone.

Basically I said it's impossible to have full proof security so the best option is to have anything you dont want people to see on a separate hard drive not connected to a computer, or have it on an offline one.
Try and hide your ip. It's useless but it makes the average teenager have to work for it. I just prefer to commit things to memory. That can't really be hacked, right?. lol. anyways, you probably know more than me about this so yeah. everyone else. dont save anything incriminating.


edit on 14-1-2012 by casenately because: doh



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 03:55 PM
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Originally posted by CaticusMaximus
reply to post by Violater1
 


Is a security router just like a regular router?

How did you notice these IPs attempting to get into your computer?


No.
You have to get one that has a hardware firewall.
Mine uses the recent extreme threat management protocol. It is a hardware fire wall with VPN and Gigabit connection. The software that comes with it enables you to see who is trying to get in.
You then take the IP address and plug it into ipdb.at, or isc.sans.edu... and search the IP. You then take the coordinates and plug them into Google Earth and you can get within a couple miles of where it is coming from.
I just checked my viewer and an IP from Denver popped up. Too funny, I wonder if it's coming from the local golf ball farm on Keystone



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 04:15 PM
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Originally posted by Violater1

Originally posted by CaticusMaximus
reply to post by Violater1
 


Is a security router just like a regular router?

How did you notice these IPs attempting to get into your computer?


I just checked my viewer and an IP from Denver popped up. Too funny, I wonder if it's coming from the local golf ball farm on Keystone


I lived on Buckley AFB in military housing literally across the street from those dishes.....those are not for hacking into your computer or monitoring your computer, I promise. I personally know a number of people that work behind the fence there......

Basically if you are not launching a missle, you are not being tracked by those dishes

edit on January 14th 2012 by greeneyedleo because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 04:21 PM
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The problem I can see with any router/firewall is the vast majority of them are produced in China. If anyone knows how to get around a built-in firewall router it would be those that are making them. Personally I use Peerblock in conjuction with my built-in firewall router (Cisco) and I still see 'hits' from China IPs all the time on Peerblock... along with many, many others. It is interesting to see the pings you'll get with Peerblock. I can be sitting on my desktop with no applications open and I'll get Pings from all sorts of places; most interesting was the "City of Detroit" ping I recieved while my computer was idle just after boot-up with no applications open.



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 04:23 PM
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Originally posted by greeneyedleo

Originally posted by Violater1

Originally posted by CaticusMaximus
reply to post by Violater1
 


Is a security router just like a regular router?

How did you notice these IPs attempting to get into your computer?


I just checked my viewer and an IP from Denver popped up. Too funny, I wonder if it's coming from the local golf ball farm on Keystone



I lived on Buckley AFB in military housing literally across the street from those dishes.....those are not for hacking into your computer or monitoring your computer, I promise. I personally know a number of people that work behind the fence there......
edit on January 14th 2012 by greeneyedleo because: (no reason given)


Agreed.
Did we ever bump into each other at the commissary on Steamboat and Powderhorn?
Again, too funny.

If you look anything like your avatar, I would have remembered .

edit on 14-1-2012 by Violater1 because: Yup, I said it, I'm just a typical Jet Jocky dork




posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 04:32 PM
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reply to post by casenately
 


There are other options as well. For work I keep everything that I don't want falling into the wrong hands on a TrueCrypt drive. It isnt fool-proof but it would take a brute force program 30 years or so to not only generate the key, let alone break into it. Probably a year if they managed to swipe the key as well as the file. It is in essence a seperate HDD that is offline while not in use but can be kept on your system. The biggest key to keeping your information secure is enimity, there are millions or computers out there and only a few have any real information so don't broadcast that you have something that anyone might want. Like I just did... although I doubt anyone would want the stuff on my drive^^



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 10:46 PM
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Originally posted by casenately
reply to post by Mikeyy
 


yeah me too man, I wrote this whole thing and then it was gone.

Basically I said it's impossible to have full proof security so the best option is to have anything you dont want people to see on a separate hard drive not connected to a computer, or have it on an offline one.
Try and hide your ip. It's useless but it makes the average teenager have to work for it. I just prefer to commit things to memory. That can't really be hacked, right?. lol. anyways, you probably know more than me about this so yeah. everyone else. dont save anything incriminating.


edit on 14-1-2012 by casenately because: doh


Having a separate drive is a great idea.
I too have one for my other stuff.



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 11:40 PM
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I keep everything important on a flash drive with linux .

www.pendrivelinux.com...

And i only use the flash drive when i need it. the rest of the time its unplugged and locked up.

The rest of the stuff on my computer is worthless to the Chinese and i also have bogus stuff that will feed back to me if they use it like email addresses.



posted on Jan, 15 2012 @ 04:00 AM
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reply to post by Violater1
 



I just checked my viewer and an IP from Denver popped up.
Wow, you seem to have a lot of random people trying to hack into your system. I think I might know what your problem is. Stop using VPN's, especially if you're using them to carry out 'questionable' activities. I used a VPN once and checked my firewall to see what sort of activity was taking place. Usually I could go months without detecting an intrusion attempt, but after using this VPN service I started getting hit from a bunch of random IP's (a lot from China and Russia). I quickly reset my IP address and the problem seemed to go away. If you're in America in may be a bit harder to get a new IP. Just my bit of experience with this type of stuff.
edit on 15-1-2012 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2012 @ 04:28 AM
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Break this down for The Regular Guy.

What software is out there that can tell me someone is trying to hack my PC?

I'm using AT&T DSL and a 2 Wire modem/router. ( or any other ISP provider and regular brand modem/router)

I would think that AT&T would catch any incoming attempt and log it because everything goes through them before it gets to me. I know they have a firewall on their end (right?) and I have one built into the modem/router. I have one in my PC if I choose to use it.

I have heard of me getting a virus that I downloaded on accident, but I would think someone getting into my home system remotely would be very hard to do, unless I allowed a program to be installed on my PC that would send them information on it. How do they get through all the security mentioned above?

How do you know who's doing it..( I know you partially answered this but I don't have the viewer software you have) and what do you look for to know they got in and recovered info from you?



posted on Jan, 15 2012 @ 04:34 AM
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I've never had a problem here.
But since landing on an infected site months ago, I now connect through sandboxie which is free. It's like putting a ring of steel round your activities. You delete everything on closing your browser. Best thing ever.



posted on Jan, 15 2012 @ 04:47 AM
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reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 



I would think that AT&T would catch any incoming attempt and log it because everything goes through them before it gets to me. I know they have a firewall on their end (right?)
No I don't think they do have a firewall, because that would involve sifting through your incoming data and removing anything that looks suspicious, which could result in a range of different problems. That's basically what they'd need to do if they wanted to censor the internet.


I have heard of me getting a virus that I downloaded on accident, but I would think someone getting into my home system remotely would be very hard to do, unless I allowed a program to be installed on my PC that would send them information on it. How do they get through all the security mentioned above?
Well basically the first challenge is to get the victims IP address. Then I think the hacker would typically do a port scan and vulnerability scan. If they find a backdoor exploit then they will be able to hack your computer. A good firewall would protect your ports and detect their scans and block them, but they could get around that.
edit on 15-1-2012 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2012 @ 05:17 AM
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Originally posted by ChaoticOrder
reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 



I would think that AT&T would catch any incoming attempt and log it because everything goes through them before it gets to me. I know they have a firewall on their end (right?)
No I don't think they do have a firewall, because that would involve sifting through your incoming data and removing anything that looks suspicious, which could result in a range of different problems. That's basically what they'd need to do if they wanted to censor the internet.


I have heard of me getting a virus that I downloaded on accident, but I would think someone getting into my home system remotely would be very hard to do, unless I allowed a program to be installed on my PC that would send them information on it. How do they get through all the security mentioned above?
Well basically the first challenge is to get the victims IP address. Then I think the hacker would typically do a port scan and vulnerability scan. If they find a backdoor exploit then they will be able to hack your computer. A good firewall would protect your ports and detect their scans and block them, but they could get around that.
edit on 15-1-2012 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)


My IP is dynamic so I'm sure that helps. I understand about scanning my ports for an open port to exploit. My concern is at my modem/router before any information gets to my PC. Any firewall running on my PC is detecting whats has been passed to my PC from the modem. I want to identify those attacks and port scans at my modem and stop them there so they never reach my PC. I am sure this would be the job of the modem firewall, but I have no way of knowing how good that firewall is.. I suspect not very because it is an old modem and that firewall must be tiny ( even if it is a hardware firewall inside the modem, which I do not know if it is or not)

I can always build a hardware firewall out of an old PC. There are tons of instructions on the net for this, but I haven't because I may need those parts for other things.I want software that works with my modem to filter, stop and report on the activity from my modem directly, before it gets to my PC. Anything like that out there? 2 Wire doesn't make it.

BTW I also use Sandboxie and love it.
edit on 15-1-2012 by JohnPhoenix because: sp



posted on Jan, 15 2012 @ 10:13 AM
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First of all, I'm going to assume that most access from the Internet from their homes using broadband and have a dynamic IP address that changes from time to time.

Secondly most ISPs that I've dealt with do not block common ports used for everyday use, such as TCP port 80 (most websites are viewed using port 80 which is HTTP), TCP port 443 (this is websites connecting with HTTPS)

If you have an Xbox or PS3 on your network it will not connect to the gaming service unless those ports are open.

So to recap TCP Ports are not normally firewalled until they enter a device on your network.

Lets talk about ISP equipment. Verizon/ Comcast/ ATT/ BellSouth ect. They loan you the tools to connect to the wild wide open know as the Internet. While they may claim firewall protection. This is achieved using a basic software firewall running on the modem/router.

Software firewalls are the easiest to circumvent, this is because all traffic travel on the same hardware and isn't truly separated. If you want stone cold protection get yourself a hardware firewall appliance and put that between your PC and your ISP modem/router.

Don't get me wrong the ISP software firewall will get the job done against everyday threats. But if someone wants to intrude they can march right over it.

Lastly I'd like to address the concerns of Chinese manufacturing and network security equipment sold in the US. There is a company called Huawei (see:en.wikipedia.org...)

They manufacturer computer chips from cell phones to enterprise security solutions. While the wiki doesn't go into technical details (google for more info) they claim that they are able to spy or gather info of devices that use their chips. Sadly this is only one company getting all the scrutiny while 100s or 1000s exist in that country.


Please feel free to ask questions and I'll answer to the best of my ability.



posted on Jan, 15 2012 @ 11:28 AM
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I've been online for about 5 minutes and already an IP of ***.**.***.*** from Urumqi China has tried to hack into me.



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