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Fukushima Grasshopper Study

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posted on Jan, 13 2012 @ 03:48 PM
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I think this just goes to show that people should not be allowed to live in the exclusion zone


About 4,000 becquerels of radioactive cesium-134 and cesium-137 was detected in the grasshoppers, all 500 weighing a cumulative one kilogram. The levels far exceed Japan’s regulatory limit of 500 becquerels per kilogram.





In contrast, radiation found in about 2,000 locusts collected further away, about 60 kilometers away from the plant, measured well below the government standard.




One aim is to continue collecting samples from the same areas to analyze how much of the radiation is passed from adult insects to offspring. Because the locust and grasshopper’s breed about three to four months into their life cycle, Mr. Fugo says, studying the bugs may point the way to how much radioactive cesium, which has a half life of about 30 years, is contracted through the insects’ successive generations — much faster than waiting to observe the same process in humans.



Source


It will be interesting to see the amount of radiation passed on in the offspring



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edit on 14/1/12 by argentus because: changed quote tags to ex tags, added source and mod notes




posted on Jan, 13 2012 @ 03:53 PM
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So, the grasshoppers are surviving in this environment? It will be interesting yet scary to see if/or what types of mutations this causes.

I feel so bad for the people of Japan.
edit on 13-1-2012 by chiefsmom because: sp



posted on Jan, 13 2012 @ 04:02 PM
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Originally posted by tinker9917
It will be interesting to see the amount of radiation passed on in the offspring


What offspring they will be able to bring into this world, if they are not all, or most mutated, like the above poster said...

But seeing the grasshoppers are still alive, my question is... were they right saying radiation was good for us?...

edit on 13-1-2012 by NowanKenubi because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 13 2012 @ 04:28 PM
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reply to post by NowanKenubi
 


Interesting thought. They will be able to log that mutations and percentages etc.
I wonder if they will be able to log sterility?



posted on Jan, 13 2012 @ 04:34 PM
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reply to post by tinker9917
 


I guess it would show as population would lower. I found this on the question, but sincerely, it is like another language to me...
Link



posted on Jan, 13 2012 @ 04:46 PM
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Well, this certainly is an interesting study.

It sounds like they killed about 500 grasshoppers near the plant in order to measure their level of radioactivity. Then they killed about 2,000 locusts that were farther away from the plant to measure their level of radioactivity.

I'm thinking that the insects were killed because of the way they described the measurement (in kilograms of insects)


Now that they have their measurements and having removed these once potentially thriving insects from the areas, they have altered the balance of the ecosystems in their respective areas.

Remember, those that were collected and measured aren't the ones who have offspring (unless they laid eggs prior to being captured).

Then again, they may have hit on a method for removing radioactivity from the area -- let the grasshoppers eat all the radiation-contaminated plants, collect all the grasshoppers you can find, dispose of grasshoppers.

edit on 13-1-2012 by davidchin because: add stuff



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 02:52 AM
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Originally posted by tinker9917

One aim is to continue collecting samples from the same areas to analyze how much of the radiation is passed from adult insects to offspring. Because the locust and grasshopper’s breed about three to four months into their life cycle, Mr. Fugo says, studying the bugs may point the way to how much radioactive cesium, which has a half life of about 30 years, is contracted through the insects’ successive generations — much faster than waiting to observe the same process in humans.
It will be interesting to see the amount of radiation passed on in the offspring
It would be interesting to see a link to a source for this.

Perhaps there is a translation error, or else the author isn't very bright. Little radiation is transferred from parent to offspring. The offspring start out small, and gain weight/size by eating. The amount of radiation in the offspring will be determined largely by their diet. If they are eating the same radioactive food sources as the parent, they will also become radioactive.

This is not a result of the parent passing radioactivity to the offspring, but rather the offspring eating the same radioactive food sources as the parent. That's not so hard to understand, is it?



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 02:56 AM
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What-eats-grasshoppers?
www.whateats.com...
"The many predators, or natural enemies, of grasshoppers and crickets include spiders, hundreds of kinds, or species, of birds, snakes and even rodents such as mice and rats.
It is a good thing that so many creatures like to eat grasshoppers. If they didn’t, grasshoppers would become so numerous they would eat much of the world’s edible plant life, and people and other animals would starve"

And-so-goes-the-foodchain



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 04:32 AM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 

My apologies for forgetting the link... I will go try to find it


Here ya go... blogs.wsj.com...
edit on 14-1-2012 by tinker9917 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 16 2012 @ 08:47 AM
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There is some amazing studies from Chernobyl on such issues. I would go to YouTube there is a lot of good videos and research on this type of thing.




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