Groom Lake, been there...

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posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 04:29 AM
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Amazing story, thanks for sharing. No question that they didn't want you there at all which was proven by pulling miracles to get your plane going after a nice night rest!

***Plane is fixed, nothing to see here, now fly away***




posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 08:07 PM
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reply to post by gariac
 


www.aviationmuseum.eu...

I'm not sure why the link didn't work the first time. However, I suspect pilot error. ;-)

I used the wayback machine on archive.org to find some of the information, then knowing what to look for, I got the other, more obscure links.

I've talked to aircraft salvage people. It is a tricky business. There is a trade off between selling useful parts versus scrap metal and precious metal recovery. [Plenty of gold on aircraft.] They literally leave the aircraft sitting around for years until it makes sense to pull the plug.

I have "toured" the Mojave airport boneyard. It requires a cash deal with the right people. I'm not sure they still "accept donations" since some of the tenants got pissed. [I have photos of the pods Fedex uses for countermeasures to SAMs. That is the only self censorship I ever did. Now they are public knowledge.] The boneyard at Victorville can be toured a bit more above the counter. However, their junk isn't nearly as cool as at Mojave.

Back to the P-3, it is often a function of what parts are interchangeable with commercial aircraft. If the part only fits a P-3, then the demand isn't as great as if the part goes on something more standard. The flow is actually going the other way these days. Many of the more standard military aircraft are getting parts from commercial aircraft.

dev.designfax.net...



posted on Mar, 22 2012 @ 03:04 PM
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reply to post by gariac
 


Yes, I remember that the turbines were really the same stock as what was in the Electra, but there were mods for military endurance and auxiliary equipment as I was told. United used to fly a large stock of Electra, and I wonder how many of those civilian planes are still active and if parts in the engine were truly interchangeable. Your research has shown me some great links to investigate and is a lot of fun, thanks!



posted on Mar, 22 2012 @ 03:29 PM
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Originally posted by indy0725
reply to post by charlyv
 


there are people in here that "know a lot more than i do" so that makes it a vaild arguement?wow.I don't have a bad attitude I'm just saying I think you're full of it.I don't really believe they;d just let some random plane land at area 51 that was having problems.I mean i understand its a military plane but I'm just not buying it.


That is just my point, and you came out and illustrated it exactly. You could have said that I may have landed some where else, or I was mistaken and we landed close to Area 51, but you did not. You said I was "Full of It" so, there we have the demarcation point.

That is the dis-respectful part, and it flies in the face of everyone on here that is interested in this story. You DO have a bad attitude, and you obviously know nothing about this area of interest in what we are talking about, so why even bother to register an opinion unless it is constructive?

I am not asking anyone to BUY anything. What would you say if someone told you that you were "Full of It"? You define what ATS has been reprimanding many about mutual respect. You need to check that "attitude" at the door when you post in this forum , if you want to ever contribute here , and get the same respect from the rest of us.

I will use the star rating to see how people here agree with what has been disgussed in this little controversy.



posted on Mar, 22 2012 @ 03:36 PM
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Awesome story!

Thank you very much for sharing!

Peace, Love, Unity & Respect



posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 07:56 AM
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reply to post by charlyv
 


Hi CharlyV.

I just wanted to thank you for an excellent post, and the usual analysis and discussion from Garic et al has been on form as always.

Please ignore indy0725, he's obviously just a troll trying to provoke a reaction from you. Ignore him and his uneducated, illiterate little brain will get bored and he'll crawl back under his rock.

Thanks again for your excellent posts.



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 04:23 PM
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reply to post by charlyv
 


I am not doubting your story but I find it very interesting that the air traffic controller would hand you over to area 51, especially at such a sensitive time, namely the cold war. There are a lot of airfields in NV, military or not that they could have handed you over too. Perhaps it's because you were all military personnel, perhaps it's because there was no testing going on that day...who knows?



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 12:58 AM
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Thomasz
reply to post by charlyv
 


I am not doubting your story but I find it very interesting that the air traffic controller would hand you over to area 51, especially at such a sensitive time, namely the cold war. There are a lot of airfields in NV, military or not that they could have handed you over too. Perhaps it's because you were all military personnel, perhaps it's because there was no testing going on that day...who knows?


All that I can say on that is that information of an uncontrolled fire in the wing area of an airplane, given to an ATC, dictates the closest place to get that bird on the ground. Now, if that were true if this was a commercial aircraft, I would certainly like to hope so, but that again is conjecture based on unobtainable facts. Certainly, in all of these years, this scenario must have a close match.
edit on 20-3-2014 by charlyv because: spelling , where caught



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 03:23 AM
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As soon as we entered Nevada, the #4 engine (a turbo-prop) started to go haywire, it started making a vibrating noise, spun down and the pilot got it re-started, and then it caught on fire.


Reviewing this tale again, there is no route where Groom Lake is the closest airport. A route through southern Nevada means Nellis, McCarran, Creech (Indian Springs back then), and Desert Rock rock would be closer than Groom Lake. A central Nevada route would mean the TTR would be the closest base. But coming from New Orleans, the southern Nevada route would be more likely.

However, you could change this tale by saying you were flying in Nevada for some time then had an engine problem and you couldn[t turn back to Nellis. A likely route to KNUQ would take a route (using roads) that is roughly up 95 then west along route 6. But still, using that route, there is zero logic in sending a plane to a base where the pilot has no charts, let along the security issues, when Creech (then Indian Springs), Desert Rock Airstrip, and Beatty are all available, not to mention Yucca Dry Lake and Pahute Mesa.



posted on Apr, 4 2014 @ 01:51 AM
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gariac



As soon as we entered Nevada, the #4 engine (a turbo-prop) started to go haywire, it started making a vibrating noise, spun down and the pilot got it re-started, and then it caught on fire.


Reviewing this tale again, there is no route where Groom Lake is the closest airport. A route through southern Nevada means Nellis, McCarran, Creech (Indian Springs back then), and Desert Rock rock would be closer than Groom Lake. A central Nevada route would mean the TTR would be the closest base. But coming from New Orleans, the southern Nevada route would be more likely.

However, you could change this tale by saying you were flying in Nevada for some time then had an engine problem and you couldn[t turn back to Nellis. A likely route to KNUQ would take a route (using roads) that is roughly up 95 then west along route 6. But still, using that route, there is zero logic in sending a plane to a base where the pilot has no charts, let along the security issues, when Creech (then Indian Springs), Desert Rock Airstrip, and Beatty are all available, not to mention Yucca Dry Lake and Pahute Mesa.



Hi gariac,
I have tried to research the details of this flight ad nauseum. I have to go with what the flight crew and navigator layed out on the table as discussed in the account. I have absolutely nothing to change. I know you are an expert here on aircraft operations in that area, but I was there, and it really happened. What more can I say. Thank you for your contributions, as they are important to me.



posted on Apr, 4 2014 @ 03:03 PM
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reply to post by charlyv
 


You don't need to be an expert on Groom Lake operations. Just look at a map of a Nevada and try to convince yourself that upon entering Nevada, Groom Lake is the safest place to do an emergency landing. It just isn't the case. For every approach to a Groom Lake, you have to fly over another airport.



posted on Jul, 11 2014 @ 07:06 PM
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a reply to: charlyv

Thanks for the great story, I had a good laugh with the submarine anecdote :')





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