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airplanes and all aircrafts 1 simple question ?

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posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 01:20 PM
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hi all just a quick question what sort off equipment is used to talk to airplanes from the ground . i mean like is it radios gps internet ? what are the airports using to speak with thier piolets sorry for the bad spellings




posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 01:22 PM
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radio



posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 01:23 PM
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VHF radio
reply to post by unknown21
 



118.0 - 121.4 ATC
121.5 emergency frequency (search and rescue [SAR]), emergency locator transmitter (ELT) signals (five-second operational check)
121.6 - 121.925 airport ground control, ELT test
121.95 aviation support
121.975 private aircraft advisory (FSS)
122.0 - 122.05 FSS EFAS (Flight Watch)
122.075 - 122.675 private aircraft advisory (FSS)
122.7 - 122.725 unicom, nontower controlled airports
122.75 air-to-air communications (fixed-wing aircraft)
122.775 aviation support
122.8 unicom, nontower-controlled airports
122.825 aeronautical en route (ARINC)
122.85 multicom
122.875 ARINC
122.9 multicom, SAR training, airports with no tower, FSS, or unicom
122.925 multicom, special use (forestry management/fire suppression, fish and game management/protection, etc.)
122.95 unicom, tower-controlled airports, airports with fulltime-FSS
122.975 - 123.0 unicom, nontower controlled airports
123.025 air-to-air communications (helicopter)
123.05 - 123.075 unicom, nontower controlled airports
123.1 SAR, temporary control towers
123.125 - 123.275 flight test stations of aircraft manufacturers
123.3 flight schools
123.325 - 123.475 flight test stations of aircraft manufacturers
123.5 flight schools
123.525 - 123.575 flight test stations of aircraft manufacturers
123.6 - 123.65 air carrier advisory (FSS)
123.675 - 126.175 ATC
126.2 military common advisory
126.225 - 128.8 ATC
128.825 - 132.0 ARINC
132.025 - 134.075 ATC
134.1 military common advisory
134.125 - 135.825 ATC
135.85 FAA flight inspection
135.875 - 135.925 ATC
135.95 FAA flight inspection
135.975 - 136.075 ATC
136.1 future unicom or AWOS
136.125 - 136.175 ATC
136.2 future unicom or AWOS
136.225 - 136.25 ATC
136.275 future unicom or AWOS
136.3 - 136.35 ATC
136.375 future unicom or AWOS
136.4 - 136.45 ATC
136.475 future unicom or AWOS
136.5 - 136.975 ARINC

edit on 10-1-2012 by type0civ because: (no reason given)


SAT phones and UHF and some HF...these are subcription based.
edit on 10-1-2012 by type0civ because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 01:23 PM
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reply to post by unknown21
 


Radios but they have their own band reserved for aircraft communications...

Aircraft also use radios to tune to various airports beacons and even their runways for all weather landings.

Navigations and radios is almost as challenging to learn as flying itself.

Peace



posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 01:24 PM
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reply to post by unknown21
 


not to sound too contrary ..but..

Why dont you know this??

why didnt you Google it??

and Why do you want to know??



posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 01:25 PM
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reply to post by ZeroReady
 


how easy would it be to hear in on planes and how far away could u hear from



posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 01:27 PM
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Depends on the type of communication and the location.
For normal speech they use old AM tech like any short wave radio with the frequency range 118 MHZ to about 130 MHZ.
For data communication there are several different systems on board. But ACARS for example uses AM in the range around 130MHZ too. They just code a 0 or 1 with different frequencys that you can even hear if you listn closely. It's just too fast to hear every 0/1 but you can send it into any pc soundcard to have it decoded with a special application.
Note: Decoding such signals is not allowed if you are not the intended destination.

ETA: Sh** typing on an iPad is too slow to have the first answer

edit on 10-1-2012 by UnixFE because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 01:32 PM
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reply to post by unknown21
 


It's FM band radio so with a modified radio or a aviation radio scanner you could listen to pretty much all of the Chatter...

It would become boring after long...it's mainly all 3 Letter Acronyms anyway...

Everything is at different frequencies....as the previous poster listed....

You have weather on one channel, ground control on another and air traffic control on another and the list goes on...

And why we like to fly with co pilots who change all of the frequencies for us !!!




posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 01:34 PM
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reply to post by unknown21
 


Very easy, I used to have a radio that let me listen to air and sea communications, I don't know what distance though.



posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 01:35 PM
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reply to post by unknown21
 



how easy would it be to hear in on planes and how far away could u hear from


You can buy radio "scanners" that receive in the aviation frequency bands. 118.00 MHz to 136.00 MHz. These are similar to the types of radio "scanners" that are used to listen to police frequencies.

I just did an Internet search, found this company website:

www.scannermaster.com...

As to how far away, all VHF is "line-of-sight" limited. The signals don't travel beyond the horizon, per your location and the location of transmitting station.

However, for a typical airliner at cruise altitudes, this distance is over or just about 200 nautical miles.


Are you in the USA? If you don't want to purchase a "scanner" to just listen, there is a free website, but USA only (perhaps other countries have something similar, I don't know).

www.liveatc.net...


Planning on learning to fly? Takes practice, but developing an "ear" to the radio is always useful.

At the above site, might want to listen to "local" (tower), especially at smaller airports (when they provide links to those).

I picked a frequency at random (121.1) and got this link to the Amarillo airport:

121.1 -- KAMA

I think it rotates between various frequencies, you can see them listed there).



edit on Tue 10 January 2012 by ProudBird because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 02:21 PM
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so lets say you can hear them would they. if they saw something in the sky would they annocune it to thier station ??



posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 02:30 PM
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reply to post by unknown21
 


It's very rare. I can only think of a few incidents.

Here is a video of ATC tapes......you have a compilation of both the air-to-ground transmissions, and some land-line recordings as well. It seems to be all edited together.

Here is an America West flight from 1995.....the airline is gone now, merged with USAir. Their radio call-sign is "Cactus":




I also know of a Japan Airlines encounter over Alaska. Flight number 1628, from 1986. Most videos I've found just re-create it, not sure if any actual ATC recordings are out there on YouTube or elsewhere.



posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 02:39 PM
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reply to post by nh_ee
 


No. It's AM

No second line needed.



posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 02:45 PM
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VHF Radio
HF Radio
ACARS telemetry
Satcom
TCAS
GPS
Mobile phones (true)

(Aircraft engineer)



posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 11:39 PM
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Originally posted by JakiusFogg
ACARS telemetry
Mobile phones (true)
(Aircraft engineer)

Two additions/corrections for these two points:
ACARS was developed just for telemetry but allowes transmission of text too. Today it's sometimes used to transfer telegrams with important informations between the home base and the pilot. Not used often but sometimes you can see special texts there. Read more here with some examples (found using search in the net): ACARS examples

Mobile phones is right and false at the same time. You can use your mobile phone in some aircrafts today as they installed special GSM/mobile hardware in the aircraft. But this is converted into network data and transfered away from the plane using satelites (antennas installed often i the tail with automated position correction to always have a satelite fix. So yes, you can use your mobile in the middle of the atlantic in these planes but you won't see any plane->ground mobile radio transmission.
edit on 10-1-2012 by UnixFE because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2012 @ 03:47 PM
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reply to post by UnixFE
 


ACARS was also developed so the pilots could order a coke and cheese and onion crisps on landing. At least that is what our pilots used to use it for! (seriously)

As for the mobiles. I didn't mean on the flight, I meant when they get bored or waiting and ring dispatch direct to get clearance!!!

Ahhh the realities of aviation great innit!
edit on 11/1/2012 by JakiusFogg because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2012 @ 04:00 PM
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Originally posted by jtma508
reply to post by nh_ee
 


No. It's AM

No second line needed.

Just the correction I was about to make.
They use AM instead of FM for aircraft communications because of the capture effect of AM.This means that a very weak distress call can be heard under a much stronger one when AM is used (it's heard as a whistle),whereas FM would mean only the strongest signal will ever get through.



posted on Jan, 11 2012 @ 04:34 PM
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reply to post by Imagewerx
 


Actually it is mandated that all communication equipment on aircraft must be FM immune. As it was shown that FM transmitters where interfering with navigation and creating false targets.



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