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2012? False.We are actually living in the year 2000

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posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 10:00 AM
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That is the truth,we are in the year 2000.

" year 2000 not will come nor will pass"

2.19 days that we have lost during 2000 years,every year,exactly 12 years,and this is related to many events in the history.
Think. the attack on 9/11.2001 minus twelve years and we have the year 1989.But what events happened in 1989 and how are they related?All the important events that we know minus twelve years and we find our self in another time,and they are all related.


TextA leap year in the Gregorian calendar includes an extra day at the end of February. A leap year consists of 366 days, whereas other years, called common years, have 365 days. The extra day, February 29 is the 60th day of a leap year in the Gregorian calendar. Why are leap years needed? Leap years are needed to keep our calendar in alignment with the earth's revolutions around the sun. The next leap year will occur in 2012. Details Note: The illustration is not to scale. The vernal equinox is the time when the sun is directly above the Earth's equator, moving from the southern to the northern hemisphere. The mean time between two successive vernal equinoxes is called a tropical year–also known as a solar year–and is about 365.2422 days long. Using a calendar with 365 days every year would result in a loss of 0.2422 days, or almost six hours per year. After 100 years, this calendar would be more than 24 days ahead of the season (tropical year), which is not desirable or accurate. It is desirable to align the calendar with the seasons and to make any difference as insignificant as possible. By adding a leap year approximately every fourth year, the difference between the calendar and the seasons can be reduced significantly, and the calendar will align with the seasons much more accurately. (The term "day" is used to mean "solar day"–which is the mean time between two transits of the sun across the meridian of the observer.)
source(www.timeanddate.com...

Convert baktuns: subtract baktun number using its minus sign, from 20: 20 -1 =19. from Mayan calendar


TextFile:U+2677 DejaVu Sans.svg From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia File File history File usage Global file usage Metadata No higher resolution available. U+2677_DejaVu_Sans.svg‎ (SVG file, nominally 107 × 103 pixels, file size: 5 KB) This image rendered as PNG in other sizes: 200px, 500px, 1000px, 2000px. This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons. Information from its description page there is shown below. Commons is a freely licensed media file repository. You can help. [edit]Summary Description Resin identification code 5 for polypropylene (PP) Date DejaVu 2.19 was released on 5 Aug 2007, converted to SVG on 22 Aug 2007 Source DejaVu Sans 2.19 codepoint U+2677 ♷, self-converted to SVG Author Various Permission (Reusing this file) Released into the public domain, see [1]. If I own any copyright over this file for making an SVG copy, I release it into the public domain as well.
source(en.wikipedia.org...:U%2B2677_DejaVu_Sans.

We don't know what kind of event to expect but sure we will have one.

DejaVu



+47 more 
posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 10:39 AM
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reply to post by diamondsmith
 


I think you missed the part where they said that we use leap years to correct for the time that is lost in a normal year.


+21 more 
posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 10:46 AM
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reply to post by octotom
 


Okay so I'm not the only one who's confused by this post. I saw that it had three flags almost immediately after it was posted so I thought it might have some good information. Then I click on it and I can't find a single thing that supports the OP's claim. Also, even if the Gregorian Calendar didn't account for Leap Days we would still only be off by less than a year, not twelve years. Not to mention the fact that we would be behind, not ahead.



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 10:50 AM
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reply to post by octotom
 



we use leap years to correct for the time
Depend from what side you look at the problem and what we have lost in history and what we can never find.


+28 more 
posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 10:50 AM
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If we have lost 12 years over 2000 years, surely at some point winter would have been summer and vice versa.......

I don't think so.



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 10:52 AM
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reply to post by woogleuk
 



I don't think so.
It's very hard to bring the truth in light,but there are proofs and you just have to search.


+18 more 
posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 10:56 AM
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reply to post by diamondsmith
 


I don't need to search, what you are suggesting is ludicrous.

Our calender is based on the Earths rotation around the sun, which is 365 days, this is slightly off however, so every 4 years we have a leap year to put it right.

With what you saying, the seasons would change, and there would be some record of that, which there isn't.

Edit: The links you provided don't even support what you are saying, are you just making this up off the top of your head?
edit on 9/1/12 by woogleuk because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 11:00 AM
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reply to post by woogleuk
 

TextIn 1582, the Gregorian calendar we still use today was introduced by Pope Gregory XIII to replace the outdated Julian calendar which had been implemented in 45 BC. The Gregorian calendar was designed to correct for a ten-day discrepancy caused by the fact that the Julian year was 10.8 minutes too long. But by Heribert Illig’s math, the 1,627 years which had passed since the Julian calendar started should have accrued a thirteen-day discrepancy… a ten-day error would have only taken 1,257 years. So Illig and his group went hunting for other gaps in history, and found a few… for example, a gap of building in Constantinople (558 AD – 908 AD) and a gap in the doctrine of faith, especially the gap in the evolution of theory and meaning of purgatory (600 AD until ca. 1100). From all of this data, they have become convinced that at some time, the calendar year was increased by 297 years without the corresponding passage of time. Sometimes a hypothesis which challenges convention can be alluring, particularly when it seems to fit most of the facts… but as Carl Sagan used to say, extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. It seems to me that all of the evidence provided by Illig and his group is circumstantial, and their conclusions misguided. The hypothesis does raise some interesting questions and point out some inconsistencies in history, but to jump to such an outlandish conclusion indicates an unscientific approach to the problem.
source(www.damninteresting.com...


+1 more 
posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 11:04 AM
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reply to post by diamondsmith
 


But the Julian calender is only 14 days ahead of the Gregorian calendar.

Also that text is claiming 297 years has been lost.

Where do you get 12 years from???



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 11:05 AM
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so we have leap years every four years...

what you are saying is subtract 2.19 days every year?

whatttttt.



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 11:06 AM
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reply to post by woogleuk
 
I want't to show you that I am more right the you are,my assumption is more true then yours like yours is more true then mine.



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 11:08 AM
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reply to post by DrNotforhire
 



2.19 days every year
Accordingly to facts.



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 11:09 AM
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lol got the point but well..just dont know what to say...so that means we have a very long time until the tribulation ....ok...



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 11:10 AM
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OK, diamondsmith, let me make this simple for you;

We use the Gregorian calender, we have done since about the 16th century, it is now the year 2012 by that calender.

None of this matters in the grand scheme of things, the calender is man made.

It takes 365 (roughly) of each revolution of the Earth to make 1 orbit of the sun.

What does it matter?



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 11:13 AM
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reply to post by woogleuk
 



What does it matter?
Hard to explain to you...very hard,believe me.But in the Bible is written very clear,
" year 2000 not will come nor will pass"



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 11:15 AM
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reply to post by diamondsmith
 


where in the bible is that written..

once again proof that its actually the year 2000



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 11:17 AM
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Originally posted by diamondsmith
" year 2000 not will come nor will pass"


Yet in your OP



That is the truth,we are in the year 2000.


So if you are saying the year 2000 will not come or pass, then how can you claim we are now in the year 2000?



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 11:23 AM
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reply to post by woogleuk
 



how can you claim we are now in the year 2000?
Because is a difference of twelve years and we are in the year 2012 I mean 2000,and the year 2000 nor will pass nor will go before the end of the world is coming,according to the bible.



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 11:27 AM
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Originally posted by diamondsmith
That is the truth,we are in the year 2000.

" year 2000 not will come nor will pass"

2.19 days that we have lost during 2000 years,every year,exactly 12 years,and this is related to many events in the history.
Think. the attack on 9/11.2001 minus twelve years and we have the year 1989.But what events happened in 1989 and how are they related?All the important events that we know minus twelve years and we find our self in another time,and they are all related.


TextA leap year in the Gregorian calendar includes an extra day at the end of February. A leap year consists of 366 days, whereas other years, called common years, have 365 days. The extra day, February 29 is the 60th day of a leap year in the Gregorian calendar. Why are leap years needed? Leap years are needed to keep our calendar in alignment with the earth's revolutions around the sun. The next leap year will occur in 2012. Details Note: The illustration is not to scale. The vernal equinox is the time when the sun is directly above the Earth's equator, moving from the southern to the northern hemisphere. The mean time between two successive vernal equinoxes is called a tropical year–also known as a solar year–and is about 365.2422 days long. Using a calendar with 365 days every year would result in a loss of 0.2422 days, or almost six hours per year. After 100 years, this calendar would be more than 24 days ahead of the season (tropical year), which is not desirable or accurate. It is desirable to align the calendar with the seasons and to make any difference as insignificant as possible. By adding a leap year approximately every fourth year, the difference between the calendar and the seasons can be reduced significantly, and the calendar will align with the seasons much more accurately. (The term "day" is used to mean "solar day"–which is the mean time between two transits of the sun across the meridian of the observer.)
source(www.timeanddate.com...

Convert baktuns: subtract baktun number using its minus sign, from 20: 20 -1 =19. from Mayan calendar


TextFile:U+2677 DejaVu Sans.svg From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia File File history File usage Global file usage Metadata No higher resolution available. U+2677_DejaVu_Sans.svg‎ (SVG file, nominally 107 × 103 pixels, file size: 5 KB) This image rendered as PNG in other sizes: 200px, 500px, 1000px, 2000px. This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons. Information from its description page there is shown below. Commons is a freely licensed media file repository. You can help. [edit]Summary Description Resin identification code 5 for polypropylene (PP) Date DejaVu 2.19 was released on 5 Aug 2007, converted to SVG on 22 Aug 2007 Source DejaVu Sans 2.19 codepoint U+2677 ♷, self-converted to SVG Author Various Permission (Reusing this file) Released into the public domain, see [1]. If I own any copyright over this file for making an SVG copy, I release it into the public domain as well.
source(en.wikipedia.org...:U%2B2677_DejaVu_Sans.

We don't know what kind of event to expect but sure we will have one.

DejaVu






Only one way to settle this guys, with math.

So according to the article in the OP, one year is 365.2422 days. After accounting for the leap years which happens every fourth year (which means 0.25 days is accounted for each year) there is still a discrepancy of 0.0078 days unaccounted for, each year. This equals 0,1872 hours, or 11.232 minutes each year.

This is nowhere near the op claim of 2.19 days each years.

Now it is an easy matter to calculate the rest.

Over 2000 years this becomes 22464 minutes, or 374.4 hours, which equals 15.6 days total that we have not accounted for in these 2000 years.



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 11:33 AM
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reply to post by diamondsmith
 


You still haven't explained how you came to the conclusion that this is the year 2000, which is clearly isn't, and nothing you can say will persuade me otherwise.

Not only that, but nowhere in the bible does it state that the year 2000 would be the end, or the second coming of Christ, or anything.

If people think it is something to do with 2000 years after Jesus' birth, then that would have happened in 1996 as Jesus was actually born around 4 B.C.

Chances are people just got hyped up because 2000 is a big number.

diamondsmith, the year is 2012, whether you want it to be or not.





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