People in Antarctica and isolated Pacific islands would survive a global pandemics?

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posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 09:05 AM
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Originally posted by ChadwickusIf you don't want to see what's in front of you, that's fine by me, I won't be responding any further to your troll posts.


Your position is unsustainable. A bioweapon requires the airborne transmission over long distances to be effective. If your bioweapon needs to have your enemies french-kiss from first to last in order to get sick then it's a silly, grossly ineffective weapon.

This way of transmission remains unproven and is considered highly improbable. Even you have admitted that.

Happy pandemic fun though!




posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 09:48 AM
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reply to post by Brasov
 


I have nothing to prove, you are the one that questioned me,the onsis on you to prove me wrong



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 09:54 AM
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Originally posted by DaarkSyde2012I have nothing to prove


Those who make a positive proposition, like microbes being able to propagate until they cause a pandemic, have the burden of proof. Since no such thing has ever documented it remains in the realm of faith and belief.

The reason why bioweapons have never been used to date is not that states are worried about loss of human life - repeatedly proven wrong - but the impossibility of such weapons. They're simply based in a theory that doesn' t work.



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 10:03 AM
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reply to post by Brasov
 


You are entitled to your opinion as well as I so lets just leave it at that k?



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 10:06 AM
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Originally posted by aprilc1
there would probably be some percentage of people who would be immune-and I reckon on an island somewhere if they didnt have contact maybe


There would definitely be some people immune (they would probably be the ones running from the men in white coats with the big syringes!).

As to isolated communities being immune, it would depend on several factors - i mean look at the Black Death. Isolated communities around Europe were still decimated so i guess it would depend upon the instant implementation of a quarantine zone and period around each isolated area.....



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 10:06 AM
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Originally posted by DaarkSyde2012You are entitled to your opinion as well as I so lets just leave it at that k?


I wonder why you take this personally. I don't.

I'm just stating that today, just like in the middle ages, people believe in things that have no real base. Pandemics are such a thing.



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 10:14 AM
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Originally posted by Flavian i mean look at the Black Death.


The fact that one needs to go as far back as 1,348 in order to illustrate a pandemic tells you how far-fetched the idea of microbes jumping from man to man in a killing spree really is.

There's no way to obtain any forensic evidence confirming the belief that the Black Death had a microbial cause, but in spite of absolute lack of evidence it is accepted as a fact. This is irrational.

If pandemics were feasible we' d have several examples every year on every continent, but they're just not happening. It doesn' t work that way.



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 10:54 AM
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reply to post by Brasov
 


I never mentionned microbial spread of infection. I merely said that isolated communities were effectively wiped out during the Black Death - this is fact and can be backed up by documented records. The point being that it doesn't matter where you are on earth, there is always a chance that you would be still be affected by a global pandemic such as the one envisaged for the purpose of this thread. Only by instigating extremely rigorous quarantine zones could this be avoided and even then there would be no guarantees.



posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 10:48 AM
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reply to post by Brasov
 


are you a russian or a russian living in Canada? or that serb russian member 'USAisdevil'??

Just a question?
edit on 10-1-2012 by mkgandhas because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 01:30 PM
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If you don't think Yersinia Pestis was the microbe responsible for the Black Death then please explain what your theory is



posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 01:43 PM
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Hello

I work in a place that would handle or investigate this matter. Aerosolization of the flu and some other extreme bugs are a concern. Our organization 3 weeks ago briefed us on the new modified H5N1 virus. This virus was modified in I think Norway by a scientists to be more contagious between mammal to mammal, instead of birds to mammals.

This bug has around a 60 percent mortality rate. This is your super bug. The scientist had a dilemma in that should he post his findings to the scientific community? If he did or does, any person will be able to replicate what he has done.

If he has this made up in a biocontainment suite, things do and have gotten out. People I think this is truly the doomsday bug. I have worked in infectious disease research for over 20 years. I worked on Ebola and many nasty things. Things that make you bleed out from every orifice etc.

That never scared me. This bug does.

May God have mercy on our souls if this breaks out!

And being in cold climates do save you in a way. But, you can't have people moving around you as much in the first place. The more remote you are the better. Just buy enough supplies for 3 months or so and hopefully the virus will run its course in your area. They usually mutate to easier control virus. But by that time millions will die.



posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 01:46 PM
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reply to post by Flavian
 


I believe that happened because people still had to get together. there was no long term storage of food and water that could be done in those days. Just think. How many times have you talked to your neighbor. They had to in order to share resources.

Remeber times change and you have to look at all the variables





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