A Second-hand World of Second-hand Cars

page: 1
1
<<   2 >>

log in

join

posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 06:10 AM
link   
Many of you have a used car or you didn't afford to buy a new one and you bought a second hand car.

Your car is the mirror of your ego maybe a second-hand ego..Because of the global crisis car sales fell and most people are buying second-hand cars only.
Or the rising of the oil price could be also a reason.


TextWe can I think also look forward and wonder about another signal we are receiving. The price of a barrel of Brent crude oil has risen by just under 6% so far in 2012. A rising oil price makes me think that there may be more demand for it than many have thought. After all so many told us the oil price will fall in 2012. Of course it may yet do so as so much of the year has yet to come and no doubt some of the rise is due to military posturing by Iran in the Straits of Hormuz, but so far the story has been different.
source(www.mindfulmoney.co.uk... nomy/


TextGlobal light vehicle sales will decline 14.7% from 2008 levels to 55.2 million units in 2009, according to RL Polk & Company. The study also predicts that the automotive markets won't emerge from the worldwide recession until 2012, later than previously forecast, due to worsening economic conditions. Growth is in Asia. Polk points out that its current forecast for 2009 of 55.2 million units is 23% below the 71 million vehicles that it predicted in mid-2008, which was prior to the start of the economic crisis in Q4-2008. But as the scenario changed thereafter, it seems that global light vehicle sales through 2015 will be more than 80 million units lower than predicted in mid-2008. The US auto market has been flattened by this ongoing economic crisis. New vehicle sales have dropped from a high of almost 17.5 mln in 2000 to 13.2 mln in 2008, with a further decline to 10 mln projected for 2009, forecasting that the US market will reaching the 12.5 unit level only in/after 2012. It is also predicted that 2009 will mark the end of US market share dominance for the domestic automakers: Asian manufacturers will capture 47% of the US market share, compared to 44% for American automakers and 9 for European brands. Long-term growth for the global automotive market will come from the emerging markets of Latin America, Central and Eastern Europe, Africa and the fast-growing Asia-Pacific/Middle Eastern region, excluding developed Japan . Beginning in 2015, it is expected that more light vehicles will be sold in the emerging markets than in the combined “saturated” markets of the United States, Canada, Western Europe and Japan. China and India are viewed as the key drivers of growth, as vehicles become attainable for an increasing percentage of these countries' huge consumer populations. These emerging markets will come out of the current crisis three years earlier than the saturated regions. Light vehicle sales in the emerging markets will top 2007 levels in 2011; this won't happen until 2014 in the saturated regions. Under this scenario, Western Europe will do better than the United States and Canada in the short term, in large part because of scrappage incentives introduced in Europe. The proposed US cash for clunkers bill is mired in partisan and pressure group politics with no immediate passage in sight. As a result, light vehicle sales in Western Europe will fall 9% from 2008 to 2009, compared to 24% in the United States and Canada during the same time frame. Worldwide, Toyota will maintain its position as the top manufacturer, with a fairly stable market share of 12% through 2020. Ford and General Motors have both seen their global market share drop by nearly 5 percentage points from 2000 to 2008, and it is expected that both will lose more market share through 2012. Volkswagen is making great inroads in China , which will certainly boost its success worldwide. At some point in 2009, Volkswagen is expected to surpass GM as the number two manufacturer in the world.
source(www.plastemart.com...

Very soon we will have no car market if a global oil crises will develop in a short period of time,just look at Iran.

Do you have a second hand car?
When do you think you will be able to buy a new car,if ever...




edit on 9-1-2012 by diamondsmith because: add




posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 06:19 AM
link   
reply to post by diamondsmith
 


I do have a second -hand car.
I always had second-hand cars.
I can not imagine me ever to have a new car.
I could afford one now.
If my Ego ever would think that it needed a new car, I would tell my ego to take a hike.
If that did not work I would take my Ego to a shrink and tell the shrink to repair the apparently broken Ego.



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 06:22 AM
link   
reply to post by Pokoia
 



If that did not work I would take my Ego to a shrink and tell the shrink to repair
Not if he has a second-hand car.



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 06:23 AM
link   
I will never buy a new car. I will always buy used... Unless NEW cars drop to under $10k with every option you can think of.

I don't see how people can go into a dealership and shell out $15,000 for a car that has no options other than power windows. Drive it off the lot and after a year you end up owning more than what the car is worth. It's INSANE.

I have a 1997 Bonneville. It's old and has 162,000 miles on it.. it also has more options than Air Force One. Power everything, heads-up display, Bose stereo, all leather, anti-lock brakes, a supercharged engine, and countless others. I paid $1,600 for it. I look at newer cars with no options, cloth seats, and (if they're lucky) anti-lock brakes and wonder why someone would pay 10 times what I did for a car that's only advantage is it's age.

I remember my mom had a *gasp* brand new Chevy Aveo. Right off the lot with 0 miles. Didn't even have air conditioning.
edit on 1/9/2012 by Adyta because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 06:24 AM
link   
Never buy a new car. Even if you can.

The value of the car drops very much, as soon as you drive off the showroom floor. For me it makes more sense to buy a secondhand car, a good quality one, with maybe a motorplan included.

vvv



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 06:28 AM
link   
The value of a new car drops more than your repayments every month for the 1st year out of a 5 year loan

Therefore if your paying back 500 a month, your car is loosing a value of 500+ a month
edit on 9-1-2012 by bluedrake because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 06:28 AM
link   

Originally posted by diamondsmith
reply to post by Pokoia
 



If that did not work I would take my Ego to a shrink and tell the shrink to repair
Not if he has a second-hand car.



I would not care what kind of car the shrink had.
He just had to mend the broken Ego.



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 06:31 AM
link   
reply to post by bluedrake
 



Therefore if your paying back 500 a month, your car is loosing a value of 500+ a month
Do not underestimate the manufacturers and offers that they can attract with.



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 07:00 AM
link   
I've never had a new car and likely never will. There has been only one car since the mid 80's that has even caught my eye and that's the new Challenger. It was a nice test drive. Uncle used to work for an auction lot where my first car came from and she never treated me wrong. All other cars after that were the leavings of old ladies who's husbands had died and left their muscle cars in the barn to rot.

Coming from a family of car nuts and mechanics and being a retired mechanic myself, knowing the shortcuts and rigamarole that comes along with a new car, it's simply not worth it.



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 07:08 AM
link   
reply to post by VreemdeVlieendeVoorwep
 



with maybe a motorplan included.
To fly and to drive in the same time that will be something, but how many can afford that.



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 07:12 AM
link   
reply to post by VreemdeVlieendeVoorwep
 



The value of the car drops very much,
Why people do not buy new cars.... but in the future if it is a major crisis of fuels with new technologies will see a different type of car.



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 07:18 AM
link   
Buying used cars is great if you know which ones to buy. Also buying them outright with no financing so you are not getting dinged for interest. I bought used around 3 years ago, and to my surprise the car has only lost 6000 in value.

This seems like a lot, but, that's only about $200/month for the duration I've owned the car.

A rental wouldn't have been as cheap, neither would anything have been were it financed.



The key is buying next generation body styles when they first come out (+2-3 years), and stick with cars that are known for reliability.

The first year of a next-gen body is usually good for ten years for resale. You should be able to keep it 3-5 years and continue the process.




posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 07:23 AM
link   
reply to post by boncho
 



next generation body styles
This happens increasingly less as sales fall.



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 07:42 AM
link   

Originally posted by diamondsmith
reply to post by boncho
 



next generation body styles
This happens increasingly less as sales fall.



If they don't come out with next gen body styles, then the older ones retain their value longer. So it's not a bad thing if you are in the used market.

I'm not sure if that is accurate though, because they often come out with something new to entice buyers. The large stock of concept cars came out during the tech bubble bursting, and the stock of high horsepower sports cars came out during the last oil crunch, where gas nearly doubled its rate in 2 years. I believe that would have been around the time of the Iraq war.

If econo classes aren't purchasing during a crunch, I assume the next person to market to is the ones with disposable income...
edit on 9-1-2012 by boncho because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 07:43 AM
link   
reply to post by diamondsmith
 


Honestly, I have no pity for car companies. They manufacture cars with built-to-fail parts, and assemble the vehicle using bolts only their "special tool" can take off, forcing you to have the dealership do work as simple as changing the tail light.

Nothing would make me happier than if all of humanity went back to horse and carriage.



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 07:43 AM
link   
Do not buy new cars. They can be remotely tracked and in many cases remotely cut off and you can be locked in the car. Personally, I will never own anything newer than 1993. Anything with OBD 2(mainly 95 and newer, some 94s) is not good idea to own if you value safety and privacy. Additionally, newer cars contain less steel and are designed to be destroyed in an accident. Before my current van, I had a minivan, an 85 Astro van. Some idiot in a 99 oldsmobile crashed into me while I sat at a red light. Their car was destroyed. I spent 10 minutes hammering my bumper away from my tire and then was able to drive away. Mass and steel are a much better defense in an accident than airbags and crumple zones. If we have an emp event(natural or manmade) your newer cars will die while my older vehicle with it's carburetor will still be drivable. All of your dead cars will provide all the fuel I need thanks to my siphon. I paid less than $1000 dollars for my current van, while many new car "owners" or lessors(very common these days) pay that every month and a half-two months. People say "we get better gas mileage", I say "good for you"; now let's compare total cost of ownership".



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 07:47 AM
link   
New cars have their place, you get a warranty if anything goes wrong for starters.

Best option is near new if you ask me, 2-3 years old which keeps it under warranty, best to check the service history first though, because a missed service can nullify the warranty.

Now if you want real cheap cars, go to an ex-fleet auction, they usually replace their cars with new models every 2-3 years.

It does carry a risk though, you can't do more than just look at the car on the lot, so you can't get a road test, or have all the running gear inspected.

Sometimes, if you're lucky, the auctioneers will carry out an inspection and provide it for you, so the key with auctions is patience!



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 07:53 AM
link   
reply to post by Chadwickus
 

The best warranty is to do the work yourself. You care about your car. Many mechanics, and especially their managers, care only for how much money they can get from you. I am not saying all mechanics are like that, I left retail work specifically because management continually directed us to inflate the need for repair work whenever/however possible.



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 07:54 AM
link   
reply to post by DarthMuerte
 


You need to have a rethink about just how tough and safe you think the older cars are...





Having said that, I would rather be in a 4 star rated 4wd than a 5 star rated hatchback if the two were to meet on a dark stormy night lol

edit on 9/1/12 by Chadwickus because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 08:43 AM
link   
reply to post by DarthMuerte
 


I agree.

In my old car, a 1997 Pontiac Grand Am, I hit a bear going 60 MPH. A full grown black bear was THROWN out of the path of my heavy, steel Pontiac. Know what the damage to the car was? Nothing. Not even a scratch.

Take one of these lightweight, 55 MPG cars and put it in the same situation. That car would be totaled and all passengers dead. The bear would be okay, though... so there's that.





new topics
top topics
 
1
<<   2 >>

log in

join