A View Inside Iran (Pics & Videos)

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posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 06:21 AM
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Iran has appeared in numerous headlines around the world in recent months, usually attached to stories about military exercises and other saber-rattlings, economic sanctions, a suspected nuclear program, and varied political struggles. Iran is a country of more than 75 million people with a diverse history stretching back many thousands of years. While over 90 percent of Iranians belong to the Shia branch of Islam -- the official state religion -- Iran is also home to nearly 300,000 Christians, and the largest community of Jews in the Middle East outside Israel. At a time when military and political images seem to dominate the news about Iran, I thought it would be interesting to take a recent look inside the country, to see its people through the lenses of agency photographers. Keep in mind that foreign media are still subject to Iranian restrictions on reporting.


Stone-age, barbaric, freedom-hating, Jew-killing, sand people with their uncovered women, robot games and fun loving youths...wait, what? Yeh.



Iranian grooms, Javad Jafari, left, and his brother, Mehdi, right, pose for photographs with their brides, Maryam Sadeghi, second left, and Zahra Abolghasemi, who wear their formal wedding dresses prior to their wedding in Ghalehsar village, about 220 mi (360 km) northeast of the capital Tehran, Iran, on July 15, 2011. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)



Iranians Morteza Alavi and Mehdi Hagh Badri fly with a tandem paraglider over northwestern Tehran, on May 20, 2011. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)



A worker stands in front of an Iranian handmade carpet at a carpet workshop in Kashan, 240 km (149 miles) south of Tehran, on November 13, 2011. Persian carpet weaving is a historical part of Iranian culture, dating back to as far as approximately 2,000 years ago. (Reuters/Morteza Nikoubazl)



Amin Gholami, right, dances in Azeri-style as Aydin Kanani plays a Gaval, a large tambourine, in the Gharadagh mountainous area in northwestern, Iran, on October 26, 2011. In the 1980s, Iran's music almost vanished. Music schools went into full recession, police or militias stopped cars to check what passengers were listening to and broke tapes playing pre-revolutionary singers, and clerical institutions even banned music as un-Islamic. But Iran's social life has dramatically changed a decade later, with a landslide victory of former President Mohammad Khatami relaxing some of rigid restrictions on cultural and social activities, including bans on music bands, but Iran has recently tightened censorship of books, films, and music since President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad came to power. (AP Photo)



The eclipse of the moon is seen behind the Milad tower in Tehran, on June 16, 2011. (Reuters/Raheb Homavandi)



Iranian women pray at the historical Naqsh-e Jahan Square in Isfahan on August 31, 2011 on the first day of Eid al-Fitr in the predominantly Shiite Muslim Iran, marking the end of the holy fasting month of Ramadan. (Behrouz Mehri/AFP/Getty Images)



Iranian dog-lover Andia caresses a puppy as she brings food donations to the Vafa animal shelter in the town of Hashtgerd, some 70 km west of the capital Tehran, on June 30, 2011. The first animal shelter in Iran, the non-government charity relies on private donations and volunteers to provide shelter to injured and homeless dogs in Iran. Canine lovers in the Islamic Republic were faced with a motion put forth by lawmakers to ban the public appearance of dogs due to their "uncleanness" and to combat "a blind imitation of vulgar Western culture." If the motion becomes law, first-time offenders will be fined five million rials (472 USD or 337 euros) and will be given a 10-day period to get rid of the dog or face the canine's confiscation to an unknown fate. (Behrouz Mehri/AFP/Getty Images)



Sevan Shahmirian, a member of the underground music band "Wednesday Call" prepares for a practice session at a home music studio in Tehran, on July 7, 2011. Many Iranian bands do not bother asking for the mandatory government permits to release their music and seek contracts with foreign companies or put their music on websites blocked by the state but still accessible to anyone with a modicum of technical skill. (Reuters/Morteza Nikoubazl)



Iranians enjoy their holidays, at the seaside, as kites fly, in Babolsar at the southern coast of the Caspian Sea, 150 mi (250 km) northeast of the capital Tehran, on July 15, 2011. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)



Wearing traditional dress, Salameh Bazmandegan, poses during a visit to "Darreyeh Setaregan" or Stars Valley, a tourist site on the Iranian island of Qeshm, which oversees the strategic waterway, the Strait of Hormuz, on December 23, 2011. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)



Iranian villagers work in a rice field during the annual harvest season on the outskirts of the city of Amol, in Mazandran province, on the southern coast of the Caspian Sea, on July 30, 2011. Rice is the main staple in Iranian cuisine. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)



An Iranian man wears Santa Claus costume, as he stands in front of a shop with Christmas decorations, in central Tehran, on December 20, 2011. (AP Photo)



A woman walks past corn as she arrives at a holy shrine to attend a mass prayer ceremony before breaking her fast during the month of Ramadan in northern Tehran, on August 4, 2011. (Reuters/Morteza Nikoubazl)



The Chogha Zanbil Ziggurat near Susa, in Khuzestan province, southwestern Iran, photographed on September 29, 2011. The ziggurat was built around 1250 BC by the king Untash-Napirisha, and in 1979 it became the first Iranian site to be included on the UNESCO World Heritage List. (Reuters/Raheb Homavandi)



An evening view shows Tehran on Monday, October 31, 2011. (AP Photo)



Iranian female kart racer, Solmaz Hamzehzadeh, foreground, competes during an Iranian Karting championship race, at the Azadi sport complex, in Tehran, on June 10, 2011. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)



Snowy, a Caspian miniature horse, in a garden near the city of Karaj, 45km (28 miles) northwest of Tehran, on June 17, 2011. (Reuters/Morteza Nikoubazl)



Covering her face with a traditional veil, a vendor works at her produce shop on the island of Qeshm, Iran, on December 24, 2011. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)



Iranian Shiite Muslims beat their shoulders with iron chains, during an Ashura holy day ritual, mourning the anniversary of the death of Imam Hussein, grandson of Prophet Muhammad, in downtown Tehran, on December 6, 2011. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)



Tuche Ayar, a member of the Cerbrus Turkish robotic team, prepares her robot before a soccer match during the 6th RoboCup Iran Open 2011 Competitions soccer match in Tehran, on April 7, 2011. (Reuters/Raheb Homavandi)



A view of Palangan village in Kurdistan province, about 660 km (412 miles) southwest of Tehran, on May 11, 2011. Iranian Shi'ite and Sunni Kurds live in harmony with each other in Palangan, although Sunni is the religion of the majority of the people. (Reuters/Morteza Nikoubazl)




posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 06:24 AM
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Continued....



Iranian Jewish men pray during Hanukkah celebrations at the Yousefabad Synagogue, in Tehran, Iran, Tuesday, December 27, 2011. Iran's population of 75 million includes about 20,000 Jews, the largest community in the Middle East outside Israel, and they face no restriction on their religious practice, though they must follow Islamic dress codes such as head scarves for women. They have one Jewish representative in the parliament under the constitution. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)



A weaver works on a carpet at a carpet workshop in Isfahan, Iran, on November 14, 2011. Persian carpets can be mostly divided into three size groups: large (3x4 meters), medium (2x3 meters) and small (1x1.5 meters), which is called Ghaliche. For a larger 24-square-meter silk carpet, every 70 cm (27.5 inches) section takes about a month to make. The price of each carpet is set by officials from Iran's national carpet company after examining each completed work. (Reuters/Morteza Nikoubazl)



Supporters of Iranian soccer team Persepolis, prior to start of the match with Esteghlal in their 73rd derby, during Iran's Jam-e-Hazfi, or Elimination Cup, at the Azadi (Freedom) stadium in Tehran, on December 9, 2011. Iran's two giant soccer teams fought in a quarter final match of the cup and Esteghlal won 3-0. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)



Iranian rollerbladers wait to hear whistle of referee, to start their competition, in a women's rollerblading championship league, at the Azadi (Freedom) sport complex, in Tehran, on June 30, 2011. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)



Earthen prayer turbahs in a prayer hall during the 7th International Conference of Mahdism Doctrine in Tehran, on July 14, 2011. Turbahs are small pieces of soil or clay symbolizing earth, used by some Shia schools during their daily prayers. (Reuters/Morteza Nikoubazl)



Satellite dishes which were smashed by Iran's police are left at a housing estate in Tehran, on June 4, 2011. Iran outlawed satellite dishes in the mid-1990s as part of efforts to curb what it considers Western cultural aggression, but the ban was largely ignored under President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's predecessor Mohammad Khatami who tried to increase social freedoms after he was elected in 1997. However, hardliners have pressed for renewed restrictions after Ahmadinejad took office in 2005. (Reuters/Morteza Nikoubazl)



Iranian youths shoot water at each other with water guns, during water fights at the Water and Fire Park in northern Tehran, on July 29, 2011. During the summer, Iran was trying to put down a new wave of civil disobedience - flash mobs of young people who broke into boisterous fights with water guns in public parks. Dozens of water fighters were arrested and a top judiciary official warned that "counter-revolutionaries" were behind them. (AP Photo/Milad Beheshti)



A woman poses for a picture in front of the beached Greek ship Moula F, during sunset off Kish Island, 1,250 km (777 miles) south of Tehran, on April 27, 2011. The ship ran aground on the southwest side of the island en route to Greece and was abandoned after salvage efforts proved unfeasible. (Reuters/Caren Firouz)



Iranian Ghashghai men play a traditional game called Dorna Bazi during a nomadic pastoralist festival in northern Tehran, on September 16, 2011. The Ghashghai are Iran's largest nomadic pastoralist group who live in Fars, Khuzestan and southern Isfahan province. Each year they travel with their flocks from Shiraz in the hot season to the winter pastures near the Persian Gulf. (Reuters/Morteza Nikoubazl)



An Iranian family walks on the solidified salts of Oroumieh Lake, some 370 mi (600 km) northwest of Tehran, on April 29, 2011. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)



An Iranian-Kurd woman talks on her mobile phone as she walks in a bazaar while shopping in Marivan in Kurdistan province, 512 km (318 miles) west of Tehran, on May 12, 2011. (Reuters/Morteza Nikoubazl)



A trader stands in Tabriz historic market, 633 km (393 miles) northwest of Tehran, early in the morning of August 28, 2011. The Tabriz market was located along the Silk Road trade route and comprised of interlinked structures and spaces for various commercial, religious and educational uses. This market was registered as a UNESCO heritage site on July 31, according to UNESCO's website. (Reuters/Morteza Nikoubazl)



Iranian Christians pray during New Year Mass at the Vank church in the central city of Isfahan, Iran, on Sunday, January 1, 2012. According to both Iranian and Western sources, approximately 300,000 Christians live in Iran, the majority of them belonging to the Armenian Apostolic Church of Iran. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)



An Iranian Sunni Kurd shepherd carries a lamb as he walks on a road next to a grassland in Divandare in Kurdistan province, 540 km (338 miles) west of Tehran, on May 13, 2011. (Reuters/Morteza Nikoubazl)



Iranian archer Shiva Mafakheri aims at a target during horseback archery competitions, in Tehran, on May 28, 2011. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)



Shahram Khodaie, a disabled Iranian, tries to play the keyboard by using a tool with his mouth during a music therapy session at the Kahrizak nursing home, in southern Tehran, on June 25, 2011. Picture taken June 25, 2011. (Reuters/Morteza Nikoubazl)



Noora (right) and Shahrzad Naraghi practice on a motocross track in the mountains overlooking Tehran, on July 3, 2011. Shahrzad Naraghi started riding motocross eight years ago to spend more time with her daughter Noora who became interested in the sport after watching her father compete in races, and began riding motorcycles at the age of four. The pair raced against each other at first and in women's only motocross races in Iran in 2009. In 2010, Noora travelled to the United States, completed training courses and raced in competitions sponsored by the American Motorcyclist Association. Women are banned from driving motorcycles on the streets of Iran. (Reuters/Caren Firouz)



The stained hand of a worker at a carpet workshop in Qom, 120 km (75 mi) south of Tehran, on November 12, 2011. (Reuters/Morteza Nikoubazl)


Nature lovers prepare before a trash disposal campaign in the Miankaleh area, 250 km (155 mi) northeast of Tehran , onSeptember 22, 2011. The Persian Wildlife Heritage Foundation (PWHF), an NGO organization, arranged a symbolic trash disposal campaign with 200 environmentally friendly people, along the Caspian Sea. They collected more than 3 tons of trash. (Reuters/Raheb Homavandi)


Customers use computers at an internet cafe in Tehran, on May 9, 2011. Websites like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and countless others were banned shortly after the re-election of Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and the huge street protests that followed. Seen by the government as part of a "soft war" waged by the enemies of the Islamic Republic, social networking and picture sharing sites were a vital communication tool for the anti-Ahmadinejad opposition. In Iran, trying to access Facebook on a normal Internet line will redirect the user to a filter page, which says blocked sites are those considered criminal, that offend "Islamic sanctities" or insult public and government officials. But, for many Iranians, bypassing the government filter is as easy as switching on the computer. (Reuters/Raheb Homavandi)



Painter Iran Darroudi poses for a portrait in front of one of her paintings at her home in Tehran, on April 12, 2011. A new chapter has opened for Iranian artists enjoying a boom in sales and interest from major international auction houses such as Christie's despite a global economic malaise and sanctions hitting Iran. Works by Iranian painters have been selling for fairly high prices, not only outside Iran's borders but also inside the Islamic state where many Iranians are facing economic hardship. Darroudi, who champions the work of women artists and has had many exhibitions throughout the world is also happy with the buoyant market, but says Iranians buy art for enjoyment and education not investment. (Reuters/Caren Firouz)

A View Inside Iran

The photo-shopping used to do so was top-notch. I am offended at the lack of extremism, and religious violence in these pictures! I can only make out the barest artifacts with regard to horn removal and I would be hard pressed to argue that any of these 'people' have forked tails, though I know they all do. Their lack of gluttony, violence, and excess is disturbing. But clearly, these people are screaming to be "liberated" by us!



posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 06:26 AM
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Some more pictures without the political subtitles : www.pbase.com...&page=all

Some fun things:

Lets not forget the Iranian female police, they look badass and beautiful.

Iran: Nose Job Capital Of World"

Iran is also 3rd in the world in sex changes, behind the US and Thailand. The government of Iran even pays for sex changes under their (gasp) national healthcare.

Few videos I found online that I haven't seen before and wanted to share them!

A 47.25 mins video - Don't tell my mother I'm in Iran


A famous documentary known as Inside Iran by Rageh..sadly it's in different parts so I'll post all 9 videos.










Jokes aside I hope you guys enjoyed the pictures and the videos as much as I did.
edit on 7-1-2012 by Prince Of Darkness because: Included more pictures


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posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 06:31 AM
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Oh yes from all those photos it is proof we need to wipe them all off the face of the planet!! They are all evil!!

Just joking.
Those photos could of been shot in any large city here in Canada. I would say like in any country 99% want to live there lives in peace and quiet. 1% want to screw it all up for the rest!!!
Just like before we invaded Iraq, they were no different then us. Now after we destroyed their lives they hate us.
Bet you never see photos like this on TMSM shows.

Thanks for posting



posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 06:39 AM
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reply to post by PLUMBER1
 


Lol you are welcome. The most surprising photo for me was the Santa pic. Also the Iranian girls go-karting, archery and dirt bikes..wow! Never thought I would see that. I know I'll get lashed out for saying this being a unpopular view but somehow I get the feeling Iran is the most liberal in terms for females among all the Mid-East countries. Saudi Arabia doesn't even allow women to drive cars and they are the biggest ally of EU and US.



posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 06:41 AM
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reply to post by Prince Of Darkness
 


Oh wow I didn't know these things /sarcasm

I saw a piece about Iran and it's people years ago on 60 Minutes, no one thinks they are backwards and barbaric.

Now onto your images, showing that everything is peachy there, is this what you're suggesting?

Because a google image search for "Iran protest" shows that all is not well.

LINK

Of course this was back during the election, but like the US and everywhere else, there are unhappy people.








edit on 7/1/12 by Chadwickus because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 06:47 AM
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Thanks for sharing


Iran is a beautiful place !

Much like iraq was before the invasion , and afghanistan. and many other countries!


Its a shame most of it will be turned into a parking by the big bullies of the world .

Keep this page for a before shot .

I certainly hope we don't have to make a thread about the "after" pics



btw that Iranian-Kurd woman hotttie !!

some women making covering up look soooo good



posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 06:51 AM
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Originally posted by Chadwickus
reply to post by Prince Of Darkness
 


Oh wow I didn't know these things /sarcasm

So you knew all these things earlier, it would've been great if you shared these things with earlier. Honestly, I didn't knew that women in Iran would ride dirt bikes, go-kart and roller blades etc. Did you see the pic. of that Iranian women on horse doing archery..it was awesome with her shades on..looked complete badass.


I saw a piece about Iran and it's people years ago on 60 Minutes, no one thinks they are backwards and barbaric.

I have seen many people here on ATS and many places on internet (public forums, news forums etc) claiming exactly that. However, I saw these pictures today and wanted to share on ATS because I liked them immensely. I guess it's not wrong on my part...is it?


Now onto your images, showing that everything is peachy there, is this what you're suggesting?
Because a google image search for "Iran protest" shows that all is not well.
LINK

I believe you have not even seen all the pictures and read the sub titles below them otherwise you would not have said that.


Of course this was back during the election, but like the US and everywhere else, there are unhappy people.

Completely agree..after all, Occupy Wallstreet, London riots, Greek riots etc. are proof that not every citizen will be happy with their government.
edit on 7-1-2012 by Prince Of Darkness because: Clarification



posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 06:54 AM
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Originally posted by yourboycal2
Thanks for sharing
btw that Iranian-Kurd woman hotttie !!
some women making covering up look soooo good

You are welcome..those women in the pic. are soo hot! wow. I read somewhere that Iranian/ Persian women spend a lot of time doing makeup and need lot of flattering from their husbands and boyfriends. But my god..these women are so hot! I'm absolutely going gaga over them.



posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 06:55 AM
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thank you for this......it puts a face to that ominous name IRAN



posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 07:00 AM
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And these are the same people being continually hurt sanction after sanction.



posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 07:02 AM
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reply to post by yourboycal2
 


Did you notice that girl (pic 16) karting with open hair, that's kinda dangerous. She could loose her scalp if her hair gets stuck in the engine. And the 4th pic. of the boy dancing somehow reminds me of old Jackie Chan movie practicing some form of martial art by his drunken master on a mountain to get revenge. Donno why but I find it funny.



posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 07:19 AM
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reply to post by newyorkee
 


You are welcome. Did you see the photo 12 of the man in Santa costume, I never thought it was possible in Iran, I think I've really been ignorant (thank you MSM). Things are not what media portrays to us all the time.



posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 07:19 AM
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Excellent photodocumentary of current life in Iran. I agree that American's don't typically view Iran as a third world nation. In fact, there was a time when it was visited regularly, and thought to be quite a nice place to live by Americans. But indeed things have changed. The culture there now is specific to them, it seems, and not welcoming to those who don't share their way of life.

These are really nice. Thank you for sharing them.



posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 07:34 AM
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Its beautiful, just like Lybia was. Shame on the iranian government for trying to ruin this quality of life for these people.



posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 07:37 AM
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Originally posted by angeldoll
Excellent photodocumentary of current life in Iran. I agree that American's don't typically view Iran as a third world nation. In fact, there was a time when it was visited regularly, and thought to be quite a nice place to live by Americans. But indeed things have changed. The culture there now is specific to them, it seems, and not welcoming to those who don't share their way of life.

These are really nice. Thank you for sharing them.


You are welcome. Actually, with all the latest news about Iran and hearing about Iran from MSM and the political leaders all these years I thought Iran had 1980 computers like North Korea and they rape and publicly hang the women if they show their faces in public. I sadly thought they also have rules like Yemen and Saudi Arabia among other Middle Eastern countries of segregating men and women which does not seem to be the case.

You are right Iran does view American citizens suspiciously with all the overthrowing, sanctions, drones from US and Iran's controversial nuclear power aspirations, views regarding Israel etc. While reading a documentary today related to these pictures and videos I found that if American citizen visits Iran they can be monitored. Also going to Iran is legal till now through travel agency and in groups.


THREATS TO SAFETY AND SECURITY: U.S. citizens who travel to Iran despite the Travel Warning should exercise caution throughout the country, but especially in the southeastern region where Westerners have been victims of criminal gangs often involved in the smuggling of drugs and other contraband. U.S. citizens should avoid travel to areas within 100 kilometers of the border with Afghanistan, within 10 kilometers of the border with Iraq, and generally anywhere east of the line from Bam and Bandar Abbas toward the Pakistan border.

Terrorist explosions have killed a number of people since 2005. Be aware that the Iranian government has blamed the U.S. and/or UK governments for involvement in the February 2007 bombing that killed Iranian military forces in Zahedan in the southeast, the 2005/2006 bombings in Ahvaz/Khuzestan in the southwest, and the May 2009 bombing of a mosque in the south-east Iranian city of Zahedan.

U.S. citizens are advised to avoid demonstrations and large public gatherings. Increased tension between Iran and the West over the past several years is a cause of concern for U.S. citizen travelers. Large-scale demonstrations in response to politically motivated events such as the 2009 presidential election, take place sporadically throughout the country. U.S. citizens should stay current with media coverage of local events and be aware of their surroundings at all times. U.S. passport holders who are arrested or detained by Iranian authorities should request assistance from the U.S. Interests Section at the Swiss Embassy in Tehran.

Iranian security personnel may at times place foreign visitors under surveillance. Hotel rooms, telephones, and fax machines may be monitored, and personal possessions in hotel rooms may be searched. Photography near military and other government installations is strictly prohibited and could result in serious criminal charges, including espionage, which carries the death penalty.

More is mentioned on this US state govt. website travel.state.gov...



posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 07:41 AM
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reply to post by Prince Of Darkness
 


(bump) I've now gone back to watch the vids, and am on the second one, it's going to be a commitment!
So far, very enjoyable with what seems to be a fair and honest perspective.



posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 07:42 AM
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Originally posted by AllUrChips
Its beautiful, just like Lybia was. Shame on the iranian government for trying to ruin this quality of life for these people.


I have never seen pictures of Libya before the war. I agree it would be wonderful if West including US/ UK and Iran becomes friends and stop chest thumping each other. Why can't everyone forget the differences and start afresh like right away. US/UK can help Iran build nuclear power same like they did for Israel in trade for oil and Iran let UN inspect their nuclear stations. It would be so cool plus we will be easily able to interact with the hot Persian girls.



posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 07:42 AM
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Awesome pics thank you. It's interesting to note that restrictions were imposed after the election of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, and that there was an active drive towards an opening up of society under the previous regime. That desire for an open society still seems to be present in a large part of the population, but I have to wonder:

With the threat of invasion by western powers, would it not support a move in Iranian society towards Islamic conservatism (even fundamentalism). It seems that in all societies that is threatened by war, the move would be towards closed-minded aggressive conservatism rather than liberalism.

When the western bastard powers move into Iran, they will destroy any positive movements within a flourishing society and alienate an even larger part of the world. Damn these selfish politicians



posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 08:00 AM
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Originally posted by PadawanGandalf
Awesome pics thank you. It's interesting to note that restrictions were imposed after the election of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, and that there was an active drive towards an opening up of society under the previous regime. That desire for an open society still seems to be present in a large part of the population, but I have to wonder:

With the threat of invasion by western powers, would it not support a move in Iranian society towards Islamic conservatism (even fundamentalism). It seems that in all societies that is threatened by war, the move would be towards closed-minded aggressive conservatism rather than liberalism.

When the western bastard powers move into Iran, they will destroy any positive movements within a flourishing society and alienate an even larger part of the world. Damn these selfish politicians


You are welcome. I was not aware that sanctions were imposed only after the current President Mahmoud was elected. I always thought they were imposed after the overthrow of the US backed Shah. Is that not correct? I honestly cannot answer which way it (war) will push the Iranian society. I think and mind you I'm only making this out of thin air it can be chaotic like what we see in Iraq, Libya and Afghanistan now.

I have read though that there is overwhelming agreement within Iranian citizens and across all political parties (including opposition) for right of developing nuclear power [Nuclear Power =|= Nuclear Weapons]. If the Iranian people and all political parties believe that (nuclear power is their right) then any country even if it attacks Iran will not be able to "occupy" it, like what happened in Iraq. All what will be done is among chaotic environment govt. will be again given to the descendant of Shah (Shah's son) who is residing in US. But I really doubt any country can occupy Iran without using a nuclear weapon. I'm no military expert so take my words casually.





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