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A Look at Guantanamo Bay and the NDAA

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posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 01:33 AM
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The purpose of this thread is to have reference and research related material on Guantanamo Bay detainees, which began the period of indefinite detention without charge or trial of terrorism suspects.

So, if I hold no opinion immediately on the issue other than use for educational purposes and research, it's because I haven't formulated one yet, have to view all the details, so please hold your horses...


Although I can say I am against it.

Provisions in the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for 2012, passed by Congress and signed by President Barack Obama on December 31, 2011, codify the practice of indefinite detention without trial into US law.

On January 11, 2002, the United States brought the first 20 prisoners to the Guantanamo Bay detention facility, marking the beginning of a program of indefinite detention without charge or trial of terrorism suspects that has lasted 10 years. Since then, a total of 779 prisoners have been held at the facility. Provisions in the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for 2012, passed by Congress and signed by President Barack Obama on December 31, 2011, codify the practice of indefinite detention without trial into US law. This page is a compilation of selected Human Rights Watch reporting on Guantanamo and related matters over the past decade, as well as facts and figures comparing military commissions to federal courts.

Reply Brief

Boumediene v. Bush

2008-11-20 Judge LEon ORDER - Release 5 of 6 Boumediene Petitioners

Should section 7(b) of the Military Commissions Act of 2006, which does not explicitly mention habeas corpus, be construed to eliminate the courts’ jurisdiction over petitioners’ pending habeas cases, thereby creating serious constitutional issues?

Al Odah Cert Petition

Al Odah motion to expedite

Brief for petitioners Al Odah et al

The rest of the petitions can be seen at the source right below...

Source

On June 28, 2004, the Supreme Court held in Rasul v. Bush, that the nearly-600 men imprisoned by the U.S. government in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba had a right of access to the federal courts, via habeas corpus and otherwise, to challenge their detention and conditions of confinement. Subsequent to this decision, the habeas petitions were remanded to the district court for further proceedings. Immediately after the Supreme Court's decision in Rasul, CCR and cooperating counsel filed 11 new habeas petitions in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia on behalf of over 70 detainees. These cases eventually became the consolidated cases of Al Odah v. United States and Boumediene v. Bush, the leading cases determining the significance of the Supreme Court's decision in Rasul, the rights of non-citizens to challenge the legality of their detention in an offshore U.S. military base, and the constitutionality of the Military Commissions Act of 2006.



A thanks to HRW for providing this information for further research and ATS for hosting it...

edit on 7-1-2012 by Daedal because: Edit

edit on 7-1-2012 by Daedal because: Edit




posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 02:29 AM
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Now maybe we can get a general idea of what this is about (NDAA)...IMO it may open the door to the US hosting prisoner of war detention camps, on American soil, instead of elsewhere, and or bringing detainees into the US from other countries, since now it is codified under new law and therefore legal?

Will they bring them here now?



Maybe they will...

S & F for you sir...

edit on 7-1-2012 by Daedal because: Edit



posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 03:06 AM
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Let the cops even attempt to arrest me....I will take all on the scene with me. GUARANTEED! YOU DO NOT TELL ME WHAT TO DO, I PAY YOU TO DO WHAT I TELL YOU TO DO!



posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 03:21 AM
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Originally posted by AnswerSeeker2012
Let the cops even attempt to arrest me....I will take all on the scene with me. GUARANTEED! YOU DO NOT TELL ME WHAT TO DO, I PAY YOU TO DO WHAT I TELL YOU TO DO!



Obviously, you must've never gotten yourself wrapped into the system (i.e. gotten in trouble). You try saying that to a police officer anywhere in the Northwest USA, and these things will happen:

- You can bet on staying at least a few nights in jail (Up to 3 years in my state)

- You can be sure to receive fines from the court for legal fees,

- You will be placed on probation (and all its associated fees and requirements)

- If you violate your probation in any way, they can revoke you and send you to a state prison.

Good luck with that approach. I would warn you since you sound young that your best bet is to stay out of trouble as much as you possibly can.



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