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The Top 10 Archeological Discoveries of 2011

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posted on Jan, 6 2012 @ 01:24 PM
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2011 was full of exciting discoveries in archeology. Thanks to the hard work of dedicated people, every year we find new things that were hidden. Here's a look back on some of the great discoveries from the previous year.

www.archaeology.org...

Years from now, when we look back on 2011, the year will almost certainly be defined by political and economic upheaval. At the same time that Western nations were shaken by a global economic slump, people in the Middle East and North Africa forcefully removed heads of state who had been in power for decades. “Arab Spring,” as the various revolutions have collectively been named, will have far-reaching implications, not just for the societies in which it took place, but also for archaeology. No year-end review would be complete without polling archaeological communities in the affected areas to determine whether sites linked to the world’s oldest civilizations, from Apamea in Syria to Saqqara in Egypt, are still intact.



Of course, traditional fieldwork took place in 2011 as well. Archaeologists uncovered one of the world’s first buildings in Jordan. In Guatemala, a Maya tomb offered rare evidence of a female ruler, and, in Scotland, a boat was found with a 1,000-year-old Viking buried inside.

We also witnessed the impact that technology continues to have on archaeology. Researchers used a ground-penetrating radar survey of the site of a Roman gladiator school to create a digital model of what it may once have looked like. And scientists studying an early hominid have taken their investigation online by tapping the scientific blogging community. The team is seeking help to determine if they have actually found a sample of fossilized skin that appears to be more than 2 million years old. These projects stand as clear evidence that as cultures around the world undergo sweeping changes, so too does the practice and process of archaeology.


Viking Boat Burial
Ardnamurchan, Scotland

Neolithic Community Centers
Wadi Faynan, Jordan

Open Source Australopithecus
Malapa, South Africa

First Domesticated Dogs
Předmostí, Czech Republic

Rare Maya Female Ruler
Nakum, Guatemala

Gladiator Gym Goes Virtual
Carnuntum, Austria

Ancient Chinese Takeout
Shaanxi/Xinjiang, China

War Begets State
Lake Titicaca, Peru

Atlantic Whaler Found in Pacific
French Frigate Shoals, Hawaii

Arab Spring Impacts Archaeology
Libya/Egypt/Tunisia/Syria
Source

Additional information for each discovery or event can be found at the above link.

Each year that passes we discover more of our history,
and 2012 should prove to be an interesting year full of new discoveries.
edit on 6-1-2012 by isyeye because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 6 2012 @ 01:52 PM
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the dog one I think is big, I know they did genetic testing on dogs and found all dogs came from Wolves and not mixes of other canniness, and around 40,000 years ago.

So 40k years ago there was a civilization of man that was advanced enough to take wolves and begin to breed and domesticate animals.

I could of swore the first agriculture societies where thought to only be 8k-12k year old... Gee looks like we could be missing something huh?

And if 12k years ago we know how far we came since than...

So if 40k years ago man started the same process... with the Ice age between now and than who really knows what was going on.
edit on 6-1-2012 by benrl because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 6 2012 @ 02:32 PM
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Originally posted by benrl
the dog one I think is big, I know they did genetic testing on dogs and found all dogs came from Wolves and not mixes of other canniness, and around 40,000 years ago.

So 40k years ago there was a civilization of man that was advanced enough to take wolves and begin to breed and domesticate animals.

I could of swore the first agriculture societies where thought to only be 8k-12k year old... Gee looks like we could be missing something huh?

And if 12k years ago we know how far we came since than...

So if 40k years ago man started the same process... with the Ice age between now and than who really knows what was going on.
edit on 6-1-2012 by benrl because: (no reason given)


The more we think we understand, the more we find out we know nothing.



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