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FBI allowed to add GPS device to cars without warrants

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posted on Jan, 5 2012 @ 01:11 PM
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FBI allowed to add GPS device to cars without warrants


rt.com

The Supreme Court will soon weigh in on whether law enforcement agencies can monitor your every move without you knowing — and without a warrant. In Missouri, however, one judge isn’t waiting to find out their word.

US Magistrate Judge David Noce ruled last week in favor of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and determined that the FBI did not need a warrant in order to affix a GPS device to the car of a St. Louis man.

Fred Robinson, 69, was accused of collecting $175,000 in compensation while on the payroll of the St. Louis City Treasurer’s Office. Authorities alleged that Robins
(visit the link for the full news article)

Additional News Link

www.forbes.com...


Related AboveTopSecret.com Discussion Threads:
GPS Tracking Device found in Civilian car
Do Police Need Warrants For GPS Tracking Devices?
edit on 5-1-2012 by Corruption Exposed because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 5 2012 @ 01:11 PM
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Well, hope none of you have anything to hide, not that they couldn't already track you regardless. There are many ways for them to track us but this is just another another abuse of of people's rights.

I hope the supreme court overrules this but the way things have been going lately I'm not sure what to expect.

Either way, I think this is wrong and should not be allowed. This type of activity should require a warrant.

rt.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jan, 5 2012 @ 01:18 PM
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GPS signals can be hijacked, manipulated and forced to provide incorrect coordinates, heading, speed etc.

Same for smart phone and cell phone tracking etc.

You can be somewhere else!

This system is fallible and can provide as many advantages to elude, evade and trick surveillance agents as it does provide advantages for them... At least for the more sophisticated and tech savvy targets.




posted on Jan, 5 2012 @ 01:20 PM
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reply to post by Fractured.Facade
 


You have to know you're being tracked and find the device before you manipulate any signals. Don't fool yourself, they are probably MUCH smarter than you.

Just saying


Well they usually are smarter, I've heard some funny stories about some really dumb feds.
edit on 5-1-2012 by Corruption Exposed because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2012 @ 01:21 PM
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reply to post by Corruption Exposed
 


Those who need to know, usually do.




Ever seen the feds show up at the wrong place, and at the wrong time?

Priceless!





posted on Jan, 5 2012 @ 01:25 PM
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reply to post by Fractured.Facade
 


If I was being tracked, and had the know how to mess with them, it sure would be fun to do so.

Thankfully I don't plan on doing anything that requires this tracking.



posted on Jan, 5 2012 @ 01:33 PM
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I dont have a cell phone and i dont have a car, i guess they'll have to sneak in my house and put a chip in my shoes...well i guess its time to start making my own shoes now out of recycled tires
edit on 5-1-2012 by sweetnlow because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2012 @ 01:36 PM
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so is this like new cars? are is the fbi gonna sneak up and slap a gps on my old truck



posted on Jan, 5 2012 @ 01:37 PM
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reply to post by sweetnlow
 


Make sure to carry cash at all times too. In Canada, our bank cards have RFID chips in them. I'm willing to bet they can track us with those regardless if we are doing any transactions or not.

I guess my whole point is that this is morally wrong, but I'm kind of used to it. Here in Canada the same thing is happening at a rapid pace and most people just don't care.

The principle in the matter is what concerns me, I have nothing to hide, but I deserve my privacy.



posted on Jan, 5 2012 @ 01:40 PM
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reply to post by Corruption Exposed
 


Well, it really isn't hard to re-calibrate the GPS device...

Or to use a mock location generator.

Even your average smartphone can use a mock service provider location to stop the tracking of your location through app permissions.

Besides, it was already ruled that the alphabet agencies could do monitoring of this type, wasn't it?



posted on Jan, 5 2012 @ 01:41 PM
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reply to post by YouAreLiedTo
 


According to the supreme court it hasn't been decided upon yet. But I'm sure there is some hidden language in some type of bill that allows them to do this while going unpunished.



posted on Jan, 5 2012 @ 01:42 PM
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reply to post by Corruption Exposed
 


Ah yes more RT propoganda... I wish they wold post the winning lottery numbers as well since they seem to know the outcomes before it even occurs.

Several state supreme courts have ruled in both directions, where some states say its not a 4th amendment violation, where other states have ruled it is,. Its going through the federal appeals process with mixed results.

I am going to wager the end result will be law enforcement must obtain a warrant in order to use the device and to have the result allowed as admissible in court.



posted on Jan, 5 2012 @ 01:50 PM
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Normally I'm against the erosion of our rights to privacy, but in this case I say let them at it. If people are too dense to realize that these devices are available even to the general public for $100 then too bad. If people are awake enough to check their vehicles once in a while (especially if they have something to hide) then these devices will tip them off that they've been compromised and they'll end up with some shiny trinkets. It's win/win.



posted on Jan, 5 2012 @ 01:58 PM
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reply to post by Xcathdra
 




Ah yes more RT propoganda...


How about Forbes?

They are all propaganda Xcat, when are you going to learn?

St. Louis Judge Not Waiting For Supreme Court's GPS Tracking Decision

You leave me in stitches almost every day bro


I edited the OP to included the Forbes link so people won't automatically dismiss it as RT propaganda.
edit on 5-1-2012 by Corruption Exposed because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2012 @ 02:04 PM
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reply to post by Xcathdra
 




I wish they wold post the winning lottery numbers as well since they seem to know the outcomes before it even occurs.


I'm not sure if you took the time to read the OP or not but I'm pretty sure it says:


The Supreme Court will soon weigh in on whether law enforcement agencies can monitor your every move without you knowing — and without a warrant. In Missouri, however, one judge isn’t waiting to find out their word.


They are not predicting anything, they're only mentioning the upcoming decision, and the previous one in MO. I'm not sure where you got the impression that they were predicting the outcome of the upcoming ruling.



posted on Jan, 5 2012 @ 02:08 PM
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post removed because the user has no concept of manners

Click here for more information.



posted on Jan, 5 2012 @ 02:19 PM
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They set the examples... But

Whatever they can do, can be done better, and way ahead of the game in the private sector, without consideration of legal constraints.

It's a two-way opportunity... You can play along, or play to win.

What they want is a way to prove someone was somewhere, but if the system can be proven fallible, then that too can eventually be used as a defense.


Lawyers love this kind of stuff and will eventually find a way to set a legal precedent based on proven fallibility of the system and have the data deemed inadmissible.



The drone in Iran did what?




posted on Jan, 5 2012 @ 02:20 PM
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reply to post by Corruption Exposed
 


Because local, state and federal appeals judges dont have to wait for a Supreme court ruling to make their determination, although from a judicial aspect they can certainly place a temporary stay in place until the Supreme court rules. What will affect those decisions though is the Supreme Court ruling itself. Just because its currently allowed now doesnt mean it will be once the Supreme rule.

As I said, several states have ruled both directions, and federal appeals have done the same. Until the US Supreme Court rules, we will have conflicting directions on this topic.

IF your car is in your garage, and the garage is closed, then they cannot legally enter and place a tracking device on the car. If your car is parked in the driveway, which is considered curtlidge, has a different degree of legalities applied to it, allows for a tracking device to be placed on a vehicle sitting in the driveway. Again that setup is determined by which state they are in, which federal district they are in etc.

Also, I called out RT, and I particularity enjoy how you deflect by using American media. RT is Russian propaganda and nothing more.
edit on 5-1-2012 by Xcathdra because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2012 @ 02:27 PM
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reply to post by Xcathdra
 


Xcat, you attacked the source not the content, and you called nothing out my friend. You should be embarrassed right now. I did not deflect a darn thing. What part of the RT source was incorrect? You attacked the source without even analyzing the content and you expect me to take what you say seriously from now on?

I am going to go out and state the obvious, it is you who is deflecting.

And you still haven't explained how you arrived to the conclusion of RT predicting the outcome of the trial. You bust in here accusing RT of being propaganda and trying to predict the future, but all they did was report the news the same way other outlets have done.
edit on 5-1-2012 by Corruption Exposed because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2012 @ 03:09 PM
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Does anyone remember this story?

FBI Gets Caught Tracking Man’s Car, Wants Its GPS Device Back


A California student got a visit from the FBI this week after he found a secret GPS tracking device on his car, and a friend posted photos of it online. The post prompted wide speculation about whether the device was real, whether the young Arab-American was being targeted in a terrorism investigation and what the authorities would do.

It took just 24 hours to find out: The device was real, the student was being secretly tracked and the FBI wanted their expensive device back, the student told Wired.com in an interview Wednesday.


He found the tracking device on his car and was going to sell it on craigslist until the FBI showed up. YOu can't even buy these things, they only sell them to law enforcement, not the public.

I guess normally they are a little harder to find, but I suppose if you're looking and it's not hidden too well, you can find it.





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