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Pentagon Scientists Use 'Time Hole' to Make Events Disappear

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posted on Jan, 6 2012 @ 10:22 AM
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reply to post by maryhinge
 


Bending light around the event effectively erases it according to an external observer, so, from the outside, there was never any sound created. How can there be sound from an event that never occurred?
There would be sound inside where the event still occurs, but not outside where the event never happened.




posted on Jan, 6 2012 @ 02:02 PM
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Hurrr durr durr.

This hyped-up thread again?

I had to go back 6 months to see when it was originally posted and I will repost my question:

Can all of you people answer me. How does this have _ANYTHING_ to do with time? Anything, in any way, whatsoever? All they are doing is bending light around an area (like how I disparaged that impressive technological accomplishment?). How does that equate to anything to do with time, time dilation, the passage of time etc? Time is still flowing within the area that the light (slowed down & sped up light) is bent around. The probe just wraps around the event and does not register the event. How does that have to do with time???????

I hate (most) "scientific" journalists and the dumbed-down, over-simplified crud they spew.

Original Post



posted on Jan, 6 2012 @ 02:14 PM
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reply to post by TiM3LoRd
 


So the further they can bend this light the longer they can cloak what they are bending it around, correct? My question is: would it be possible to do this in the real world. What mechanism/equipment is needed say if they wanted to do it on a battlefield how do they do it? Give me the young adult sci fi explanation please : P



posted on Jan, 6 2012 @ 02:20 PM
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reply to post by polit
 


It doesn't technically. It APPEARS to stop time to the observer.

Think of a star. We see it shining in the sky, but hundreds of thousands of light years away it may be burned out and dead, a blackhole. We can't tell until enough time passes to and the final light has reached us. So to us it appears that star is still giving off light because of the distance, but in real time it is actually dead.

So if they bend the light around something, as a real world example i'll say a tank (though they are really far from being able to do this in real life it seems), the light is bent around it stretching out the time it takes the light to reach an outside observer so they could blow up the tank and the longer they stretch the light the longer it will take the person observing to see what has actually already happened in front of them at a distance that the light should have reached them and made them aware of almost instantaneously. So they are still witnessing the past state of the tank because the reality of the present has been slowed down in reaching them.

At least I think that's whats going on and how they would actually do that to a real world object eludes me completely.



posted on Jan, 6 2012 @ 04:50 PM
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reply to post by maryhinge
 


Really I have no idea, or even if that is possible... but is how the legend goes, and what I have always heard...



posted on Jan, 6 2012 @ 04:54 PM
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reply to post by GogoVicMorrow
 


Because of light's intimate relationship with time in Relativity, it's more than just an appearance of stopping time. Temporally bending time around an event quite litteral stops time within the cloaked region from the perspective of an outside observer. Time is not stopped outside for the observer, and time is not stopped or slowed at all for an observer inside the cloaked region, but, as measured by someone on the outside, time most definitely stops inside the cloaked region.



posted on Jan, 6 2012 @ 06:15 PM
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Originally posted by CLPrime
reply to post by GogoVicMorrow
 


Because of light's intimate relationship with time in Relativity, it's more than just an appearance of stopping time. Temporally bending time around an event quite litteral stops time within the cloaked region from the perspective of an outside observer. Time is not stopped outside for the observer, and time is not stopped or slowed at all for an observer inside the cloaked region, but, as measured by someone on the outside, time most definitely stops inside the cloaked region.



Maybe you should know what you are talking about before responding to somebody with more insane ATS gobbledygook. This does not affect time in any way, whatsoever. No way, no how. Time still keeps on timing. For the laser beam ("it" still "experienced" the _SAME_ amount of time) it was slowed down, warped around an area in space, and then sped back up again. For the space, nothing happened! Except it stopped being laserbeamed for a fraction of a second. Nothing temporally-related whatsoever changed within the space. And there is no "observer." There is the laser beam, and the interfering laser beam that, if it had managed to interfere with the original laser beam, would have altered its frequency. However, because first laser beam was shot through a lens (the authors call it a Split-Time Lens!!!!), it caused the laser beam to bend around the area where it would have been altered by the second laser beam. The originally deflected laser beam then travels through another of the amazing Split-Time Lenses and wahlah!

You people are all too caught up in buzz-words. The difference between event-cloaking and object-cloaking, for example, is that event-cloaking hides something for only a FINITE amount of time. It does not hide it forever, as an actual real-world invisibility cloak (that I can theoretically wear) would.

From the original article:



To achieve spatial cloaking, the index of refraction is manipulated to slow light from a probe around an object in such a way that a "hole" in space is created, and it remains hidden [3[14]. Alternatively, it may be desirable to cloak the occurrence of an event over a finite time period, and the idea of temporal cloaking was proposed in which the dispersion of the material is manipulated in time to produce a "time hole" in the probe beam to hide the occurrence of the event from the observer [15]. This approach is based on accelerating and slowing down the front and rear parts, respectively, of the probe beam to create a well controlled temporal gap in which the event occurs so the probe beam is not modified in any way by the event. The probe beam is then restored to its original form by the reverse manipulation of the dispersion.



posted on Jan, 6 2012 @ 06:31 PM
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Originally posted by polit

Maybe you should know what you are talking about before responding to somebody with more insane ATS gobbledygook.


Maybe you should know who you are talking to before claiming that a member you know nothing about is speaking "more insane ATS gobbledygook."
You don't seem to be aware of the relationship between time and light in Relativity, which is the basis of this process.



posted on Jan, 6 2012 @ 07:07 PM
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And that's just what they want us to know. They've been experimenting with cloaking at LEAST since Philadelphia Experiment & Montauk Project circa 1943.

It amazes me how complacent people are when they read about things like this in the MSM. But when it's discussed devoid the media approval....it's regarded as fringe conspiracy talk. Just amazing how programmed the average person is.
Chemtrails anyone?



posted on Jan, 6 2012 @ 07:07 PM
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And that's just what they want us to know. They've been experimenting with cloaking at LEAST since Philadelphia Experiment & Montauk Project circa 1943.

It amazes me how complacent people are when they read about things like this in the MSM. But when it's discussed devoid the media approval....it's regarded as fringe conspiracy talk. Just amazing how programmed the average person is.
Chemtrails anyone?



posted on Jan, 6 2012 @ 07:12 PM
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Ok, so basically now they can do this:




posted on Jan, 6 2012 @ 07:44 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 


Time doesn't stop though. Even by your own explanation. It's more like adding frames so the observer isn't aware of what is really going on until the manipulation ends. Time doesn't "stop" for the cloaked area or the observation area.



posted on Jan, 6 2012 @ 08:11 PM
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reply to post by GogoVicMorrow
 


In Relativity, the rate of the passage of time is determined by the speed of light.
How do you tell time?



posted on Jan, 6 2012 @ 08:11 PM
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It's a way to use hardware in addition software for security. Like an invisible metal key that has to be turned at the exact nanosecond to make the password correct.



posted on Jan, 6 2012 @ 08:23 PM
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Using the time hole would be easier against something that detected a limited range of light, like an infrared satellite.

Maybe to hide the fact that a electrical communication had been sent through an antenna.



posted on Jan, 6 2012 @ 09:29 PM
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A time hole would invovle slowing time down, doing the event, and then speeding time up to catch up with the frame of reference of the outside observer.

Light always goes as fast as it can through any medium or gravity field. Since the medium didn't change, (it was always in the same fiber optic cable) gravity must have been used to alter the speed of light. Gravity strength and the speed of time passing are inversely proportional ( if one gets bigger the other gets smaller)



posted on Jan, 6 2012 @ 10:27 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 


From my understanding the speed of light isn't changed here. It is just made to go further to reach the observer, kind like stars. They are still traveling at the speed of light but they have to travel a long distance. If you stretch out the traveling light by bending it it is traveling the same speed but to a further distance. That is why the amount they have been able to cloak is in such a tiny amount.

So not changing the speed of light, but changing the distance it travels. So the answer again would be no. It has nothing to do with stopping time or altering the flow of it.
edit on 6-1-2012 by GogoVicMorrow because: (no reason given)

edit on 6-1-2012 by GogoVicMorrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 6 2012 @ 10:30 PM
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reply to post by Semicollegiate
 


Kind of like those games in the arcade where you have to hit the button to stop a light in an exact location except in order to see the light/location you need to alter how time flows around it (and of course on a much greater speed/time scale)?
edit on 6-1-2012 by GogoVicMorrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 6 2012 @ 10:32 PM
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reply to post by GogoVicMorrow
 


From the article in the OP:


The entire experiment occurred inside a fiber optics cable. Researchers passed a beam of green light down the cable, and had it move through a lens that split the light into two frequencies, one moving slowly and the other faster. As that was happening, they shot a red laser through the beams. Since the laser “shooting” occurred during a teeny, tiny time gap, it was imperceptible.


The time duration capable of being "cloaked" is limited by the length of the light beam and the efficiency of the lens.



posted on Jan, 6 2012 @ 10:34 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 


Thus distance is necessary. The longer the distance the longer the amount of time they can cloak. That's what I was explaining. If they were literally doing something to "stop time" distance wouldn't be a factor.
edit on 6-1-2012 by GogoVicMorrow because: (no reason given)



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