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A Cottage Food Law in California could soon become reality

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posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 09:02 AM
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A Cottage Food Law in California could soon become reality


news.yahoo.com

If such bill passed, the California State Legislature would allow for the sale of specific home-made food products, such as baked goods (excluding those with cream or meat fillings), jams and jellies, candy, granola and other dry cereal, popcorn, waffle cones, nut mixes, chocolate-covered non-perishables (i.e. nuts and dried fruit), roasted coffee, dry baking mixes, herb blends, and dried tea. Cottage Food Laws, also known as Baker's Bills, are laws that allow people to prepare certain foods in their own home kitchen.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 09:02 AM
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I hope this is passed and it catches on everywhere. It is ridiculous that our law makers want to prevent us from making foods at home and selling them. Hopefully, if this passes, we will also have more freedom when it comes to heirloom seeds, gardens, raw milk, and rain water that the government is placing a strangle hold on.

Although the article does state that a permit will be necessary to sell these items, it's a small price to pay for home made, organic foods.

I'll try to post any further updates and I encourage others to do this as well. Especially the members who are in California.

Chin up, folks! Some things are changing for the better.


news.yahoo.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 09:42 AM
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I just wanted to add this important paragraph from the article:


As of 2011, there are more than a dozen states in the U.S. allowing come sort of commercial homemade food: Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, and West Virginia. There are at least an additional eight states with organizations and communities working in order to implement similar laws, including Colorado, Georgia, Illinois, Maryland, Mississippi, New Jersey, New York, Oklahoma, and Wyoming.


Hey, Florida! What's wrong with you?

edit on 4-1-2012 by Afterthought because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 09:46 AM
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reply to post by Afterthought
 


I didn't realize there was a specific need for the law? I know tons of people in Florida that sell eggs, honey, pies, cakes, etc. They don't have any license, and they do business person to person. They don't have a spot to sell retail, so they stay under the radar I guess?

It would probably just take one idiotic anonymous complaint to get them into trouble though.



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 10:02 AM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


That's what I was also wondering. I pass stands all the time selling boiled peanuts, fruits, and local honey.

This is what I've dug up:
www.thefreshloaf.com...

You probably already know that the Florida Cottage Food Bill 7209 was signed by the Governor and passed on June 21st and the effective date is July 1, 2011.

The State of Florida now has a regulatory system for Cottage Food Operations that allows for the production of non potentially hazardous foods i.e. cakes, cookies, jams, jellies, breads, and dry mixes prepared in a personal residence using home kitchen appliances. Annual gross sales cannot exceed $15,000 and your products cannot be sold on the internet, mail order or wholesale, which includes such places as restaurants and retail outlets. There are food labeling requirements; and the Department of Agriculture has the authority to investigate home-based food operations if there is a legitimate complaint and enforce penalties for non compliance. Look, it's a start! Congrats Florida Bakers & Happy Baking!!!


I guess the article in the Op forgot about Florida.

edit on 4-1-2012 by Afterthought because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 10:24 AM
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.... We need a law to give us permission to do something?

.... I don't like the implications of this paradigm shift in judicial review.



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 10:32 AM
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Originally posted by Aim64C
.... We need a law to give us permission to do something?

.... I don't like the implications of this paradigm shift in judicial review.


Seems pretty Bass-ackwards if you ask me.

Laws restrict. The Constitution restricts the Federal Government, and every other law in the land restricts the individual. So, to make a law giving us permission to do something is just evidence of how cumbersome and over-bearing the other laws have all become. These days, just about every single daily activity has some regulation on it, and they keep making more laws day by day by day, and now they are even making laws granting permission to ignore other laws?



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 10:57 AM
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Well people can get liscenses to operate but they have red tape and hoops. Such as, your own commercial kitchen setup , like in a basement, or even a fifth wheel. Something that can be inspected, and here in Canada you need your food safety certificate, even to make bath salts. Some areas, you can operate a business out of any dwelling, most restrict them to certain areas. And its all the restriction that are corporate law and control to enforce the illegal pyramid corporate monopolies that has to be disobeyed and ended by ciitizens.
edit on 4-1-2012 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 10:58 AM
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reply to post by Afterthought
 


Good news. I notice they're excluding not just meat and dairy, but also fresh veggies. No doubt this has to do with all the new diseases that are jumping species and kingdom barriers.


Good catch. S&F



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 11:21 AM
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Originally posted by Aim64C
.... We need a law to give us permission to do something?

.... I don't like the implications of this paradigm shift in judicial review.


I completely agree. It is strange, but considering how the past decades have tightened restrictions, it's probably easier to get a new law passed than to have past laws and regulations reversed. At least this is how I'm interpreting this.



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 11:42 AM
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It is kind of humorous, though.

I know several places that have gone "kaboom" because of meth labs gone wrong, and I'm privy to several underground supply lines of illicit materials (many of them grown and produced somewhere around here, or at least in the U.S.).

Let's get the law involved in bake sales and home industry. We're missing out on tax revenue from those industrious illegal immigrants. We need more regulation.

God Forbid we regulate the # that matters. Like the border. That'd be too draconian.

But don't you #ing eat that cookie! It might be made with real butter, or some other blasphemous ingredients.



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 11:59 AM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready

Originally posted by Aim64C
.... We need a law to give us permission to do something?

.... I don't like the implications of this paradigm shift in judicial review.


Seems pretty Bass-ackwards if you ask me.

Laws restrict. The Constitution restricts the Federal Government, and every other law in the land restricts the individual. So, to make a law giving us permission to do something is just evidence of how cumbersome and over-bearing the other laws have all become. These days, just about every single daily activity has some regulation on it, and they keep making more laws day by day by day, and now they are even making laws granting permission to ignore other laws?


Remember the saying "Ignorance of the law is no excuse"? Well, I saw an article in the news the other day saying that just this past year alone we had somewhere around 40.000......... let me say it again.... 40,000.... new laws implemented.

So, who ISN'T a criminal these days?

When we have so many laws that lawyers and judges themselves can't follow them, we have far too many laws.

Personally, I just found out that in my state if I were to complain about meat production I could spend 6 years in prison. WOOO HOOO for the corporate CONTROL we've found ourselves in.

Watch the movie Food, Inc., it is very enlightening in regards to food laws and who is in control. It seems we have about 3-5 major corporations which control all the food production in the USA under many different names.

Harm None
Peace



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 12:05 PM
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reply to post by amazed
 


I just planted some blueberry and blackberry bushes. I already have a pear tree and banana trees. Putting up a beehive at the end of January, and planting a large garden about mid-February. There is a nice little pond on some abandoned property adjacent to my own. Perch, Bluegill, and Bass, and I'm considering stocking some catfish in there. I have a friend trying to convince me to put in chickens and rabbits, not sure I have room, but considering it. I already have well-water, and a gray water septic system. I could be completely off-grid by the end of 2012. Hopefully.

I'm not out in the country or anything. My wife and I both work full-time jobs, we are only 5 minutes from the edge of town, and my kids go to public schools.

We are hoping to have the best of both worlds. No need for Walmart or City Utilities, but still living a normal life unapparent to anybody that knows us.

Opting out of the government control and corporate influence at every avenue possible.



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 12:29 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


Chickens are great, we have 5 girls and they keep us with more eggs than we eat even in the winter. They also do a great job keeping our compost area tilled and our garden and yard free of bugs, once the plants are big enough to survive their scratching :-).

Actually within the first year of having them, all "earwigs" seemed to be gone lol I was saying to my husband we need more space so we have more bugs for them.

We do pretty much live "in town" and have had our house on the market in the hopes of selling it, obviously the economy is making that a problem. Our plan is to become a bit more self reliant but as of now we don't have a large enough yard for the gardening we like to do. Though I do quite a bit of the square foot gardening along with container and trellis gardening.

Getting out from under as much corporate control as possible is also our goal. With 90% of products in the grocery stores containing GMO's, this seems impossible unless we move towards growing as much of our own foods as we can.

Once people start digging into the laws, I think they will begin to realize that many of the laws in place right now do nothing what so ever to protect "the real people", they protect the corporate "person-hood".

Once private for profit prison systems were implemented during the 80's we began to have more and more laws creating more and more criminals. The USA has the highest documented prison population. It is actually kind of scary when I stop to think about it. Before the private for profit prison system we had about 1 in 400 people in prison, we now have about 1 in 100.

en.wikipedia.org...

We have too many laws protecting corporate interests and too few which protect a real person.

Harm None
Peace



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 12:47 PM
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Originally posted by Afterthought


I hope this is passed and it catches on everywhere. It is ridiculous that our law makers want to prevent us from making foods at home and selling them. Hopefully, if this passes, we will also have more freedom when it comes to heirloom seeds, gardens, raw milk, and rain water that the government is placing a strangle hold on.

Although the article does state that a permit will be necessary to sell these items, it's a small price to pay for home made, organic foods.

I'll try to post any further updates and I encourage others to do this as well. Especially the members who are in California.

Chin up, folks! Some things are changing for the better.


news.yahoo.com
(visit the link for the full news article)


Organic milk is fine, but unpastuerized is just crazy.

We have a farmer near us who has an organic farm, his dairy products sickened about 50 people last year because he didn't pastuerize any of it.

Killing the harmful bacteria doesn't do anythig to the milk, except keep you from getting sick.



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 12:53 PM
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reply to post by AGWskeptic
 



Killing the harmful bacteria doesn't do anythig to the milk, except keep you from getting sick.


But what does killing the good bacteria do?

You don't just kill the harmful bacteria, you also kill the good bacteria.

Personally, I think militant hand-washing, anti-bacterial soaps, and overuse of bleach is to blame for many of our ailments. Good bacteria are very good at competing for space and limiting the existence of bad bacteria. When you kill it all off, the most aggressive come back first, and those are usually the worst ones.

I've never had raw milk, but my mother grew up on a farm, and she says it is incomparable! People typically get sick from unsanitary production practices, not necessarily the milk itself. They have to pasteurize and use preservatives and add-ins when they are producing in mass, but not when it is just a farmer consuming their own.



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 01:04 PM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
I didn't realize there was a specific need for the law? I know tons of people in Florida that sell eggs, honey, pies, cakes, etc. They don't have any license, and they do business person to person. They don't have a spot to sell retail, so they stay under the radar I guess?


They all need to be arrested by the Jack Booted Troopers...

Like these little girls

3 Girls Busted for illegal Lemonade Stand



Seems making little girls cry is the new 'police protection' we are getting... what no crack dealers to bust? I thought a Lemonade stand by kids was an American Icon? $50 a day for a permit? $180 a year as well?

10 Year Old Gets Ticketed and fined for a lemonade stand



Sunday, July 10, 2011
Michigan Woman Arrested and Jailed for Growing Organic Vegetables in her Front Yard



bungalowbillscw.blogspot.com...


Bake Sale Busted

Chappaqua school kids selling homemade brownies in the park get turned in by their own town politician because they don’t have a permit. Rob Ryser reports.
www.lohud.com...

Busted: NY Politician Calls Cops on Kids’ Unlicensed Bake Sale
www.freerepublic.com...

So yeah, its about time they make some laws to stop this


edit on 4-1-2012 by zorgon because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 01:52 PM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
reply to post by AGWskeptic
 



Killing the harmful bacteria doesn't do anythig to the milk, except keep you from getting sick.


But what does killing the good bacteria do?

You don't just kill the harmful bacteria, you also kill the good bacteria.

Personally, I think militant hand-washing, anti-bacterial soaps, and overuse of bleach is to blame for many of our ailments. Good bacteria are very good at competing for space and limiting the existence of bad bacteria. When you kill it all off, the most aggressive come back first, and those are usually the worst ones.

I've never had raw milk, but my mother grew up on a farm, and she says it is incomparable! People typically get sick from unsanitary production practices, not necessarily the milk itself. They have to pasteurize and use preservatives and add-ins when they are producing in mass, but not when it is just a farmer consuming their own.


I grew up near a dairy farm in Wisconsin, and I've drank more raw milk than I can remember. My grandmother used to get a fresh pitcher every other day. It was more like cream than milk, very thick, and served warm. We drank Carnation powdered milk on the other days, which is only marginally easier to drink.

I agree that we are losing our herd immunity, but these farms are often unsanitary enough that I'll take food safety over getting healthy bacteria.

The problem is that the milking parlor and the processing are often in the same building.

In those circumstances it's way too easy to get cross contamination.



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 03:02 PM
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What I dislike is the 'selective' enforcement of laws.

Out here you have people selling lukewarm corn and tamales out of grocery carts. Now I may be accusing them of stealing but I don't think that the person selling has the last name Stater Albertson or Ralph.
Nor do I see them dragging a porta potty and sink to wash their hands in after using said facility.
If someone calls in to report them the police will just give them a warning and tell them to move along, and they are selling the same thing the next day. How many times would you or I get a warning for a rolling stop at an intersection?



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 04:24 PM
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Yes, this is great news and I am glad to see it catching on in a lot of states. However, it is sad that we the people have to fight to get laws passed to protect us because the people we send to congress allow agencies like the FDA and USDA to take our God given rights of growing your own food and sharing it with who you will on mutual terms. This is the most basic human right there is.

When the FDA comes out and says you do not have the right to food for your body that you choose to eat that is wholesome. Total Tyranny is the only way it can be described.

It is all part of Agenda 21. They want you to eat the food with all the chemicals in it and DIE! of CANCER!

Understanding Agenda 21 video
A Guide to Understanding Agenda 21
Exposing Agenda 21
Colorado may keep cottage food industry in check



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