What do you think humans feel in the exact moment of death?

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posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 07:57 AM
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The Tibetan book of the dead has some interesting angles on this topic. Give it a read.

The journey through the after-death states is described as a series of vivid encounters and revelations; most are, frankly, terrifying. But at each stage, the book offers the consolation that "liberation" can be attained if one is sufficiently primed to recognise and seize the opportunity. The first, briefest, stage is the moment of death itself, when a clear light of "inner radiance" dawns in the dying mind. If one is able to recognise this light as the true nature of mind - and merge with it - then one is immediately "liberated", which is to say, spared the journey towards rebirth. If not, one is thrown into the next, intermediate state.
Here the deceased is confronted initially with a series of visions of the 100 "wrathful and peaceful deities" of the Tibetan Buddhist pantheon, each exactingly described. The lord Vajra Heruka, for example, is "dark blue in colour, with three faces, six arms and four legs", carrying a skull-cap, an axe and a ploughshare. "The female Vajrakrodhisvari is embracing his body, her right hand clasped around his neck and her left offering a skull-cap filled with blood to his mouth…"
These visions are not held to have an inherent reality; rather they are representations of different aspects of the enlightened mind - images depicted in pictures and wall-hangings in temples, which the dying person will be assumed to have meditated on throughout their lifetime. Recognising these images, the text says, is "like recognising your own mother", and presents a further opportunity to merge with the primordial state of being and thus be spared the anguish of rebirth.
However, those clouded by confusion and weighed down by the negative inheritance of their past actions are doomed to roam further downwards into the intermediate state. Now, the subtle mental body of the deceased will experience the sense of being able to move unobstructed through earth, boulders and mountains; they will see their home and their grieving relatives, "as if in a dream", and, realising that they have died, experience an overwhelming suffering "like a fish writhing on hot sand".
Then comes the "life review" in which the "innate good conscience" of the deceased will gather together all of their virtuous actions, counting them out with white pebbles, and the "innate bad conscience" will count out non-virtuous actions with black pebbles. "At this moment you will tremble with extreme fear, awe and terror… In the mirror of past actions [all your virtues and non-virtues] will be reflected vividly and precisely. Your attempts at deceit will be no use. Tying a rope around your neck, Yama [Lord of Death] will drag you forward. He will sever [your head] at the neck, extract your heart, pull out your entrails, lick your brains, drink your blood, eat your flesh and suck your bones. Despite this, you will not die."
At length, reeling from these torments, the deceased will arrive at the portal of rebirth. The book offers advice on "Obstruction of the Womb Entrances" - a sort of last chance saloon - to prevent this eventuality. If not heeded, then the deceased is drawn to seek rebirth in one of the six "realms" of existence - as a god, a demigod, a human, an animal, an anguished spirit or a hell-being, according to their past actions. Those destined for the human realm will be drawn to a man and woman in the act of sex, experiencing the "co-emergent delight" in the midst of the meeting between sperm and ovum, "until finally you will emerge [from the womb] and open your eyes".

edit on 4-1-2012 by rom12345 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 08:00 AM
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Fear 5 seconds
SHOCK 5 seconds awake 10 seconds asleep
Freedom of control of their existance as if pulled or directed
depending on potential location point rejuvinating feeling of where am I now depending on positive or negative life before switch.. Not that I have experienced it but gave it a try..

Interesting



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 08:07 AM
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Originally posted by Ophiuchus 13
Fear 5 seconds
SHOCK 5 seconds awake 10 seconds asleep
Freedom of control of their existance as if pulled or directed
depending on potential location point rejuvinating feeling of where am I now depending on positive or negative life before switch.. Not that I have experienced it but gave it a try..

Interesting
Hi Ophiuchus 13,even if we don't really know,you give 15 seconds and you could be right,It's very interesting to see how it's compacting the time in that moment, and don't gave it a try,the call for each of us will come but we don't know when.



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 08:09 AM
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My near death experience

When I was in High School many years ago I was in a terrible car accident where we flipped upside down into a river and were completely submerged.

I remember it clear as day. The car immediately filled up with water, there was no slow rising like you see in the movies. I was suspended upside down by my seat belt and my weight made me unable to release the buckle. Ironically I was the only passenger of the 4 of us to be wearing a seat belt, and the only passenger that was trapped. My friends had a breathing pocket on the floorboards of the car and underwater I could hear them calling my name as everyone was present but me.

I basically held my breath, waiting to die as I realized at the time the situation was utterly hopeless for me, and again I have a perfect clear memory of the event...for better or worse.

Here's the thing..as I held my breath there was no moment of desperation.. it was more like falling asleep.It was not like a clock stopping. In fact, it was rather peaceful. I was under water for 8 minutes or so, according to paramedics who were able to resuscitate me. Does this constitute death? I was certainly flatlined, and I certainly was not coming back without intervention of some sort...

My emotional range went like this, I immediately accepted what was happening and was aware I was going to die. I remember saying to myself, "well this is how I am going to die"... and I felt absolute peace about it after only a split second of anxiety. If I can relate it to any other experience, it is like the anxiety and subsequent relaxation you feel of when you are in a plane and it first starts taking off down the runway... that twinge of anxiety that goes away once you know things are OK..... My next thoughts were of my family, and wondering how they were going to take it, i felt sorry that they would be grieving for me... other than that I could hear my heartbeat slowing down as I held my breath.. then I just drifted off... [snip]
I can tell you there certainly was a period of nothingness, and in between the nothingness and consciousness, there is, for lack of a better term, "cognitive reasoning" where your brain is lucid and you basically have a choice to live or not.. It feels that your consciousness is separated from your body, I remember it clearly and is really for another thread....

But to answer your question, in my experience I was aware i was dying, and the actual moment of death was not bad at all.. rather one of the most serene moments was in that minute I was holding my breath, knowing I had nothing left in my life to fear..


edit on 4-1-2012 by mrperplexed because: Additional info: Everyone lived :-)
edit on 4-1-2012 by elevatedone because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 08:12 AM
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I think you feel euphoria when the neurons go haywire to ease the passing.



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 08:17 AM
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reply to post by worldwatcher
 



imo, humans probably feel every human emotion all at once at their final moment
Probably you are right,maybe it may depends on how death comes consciously or unconsciously.Death is described in different ways by every culture, for example Maya were mass human sacrifices,and a different perception if the exact moment of death. In the war in Yugoslavia executioners who shot in the head describe a glow on innocent victims strange eyes , before they pull the trigger, something like "we see us".

edit on 4-1-2012 by diamondsmith because: P



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 08:20 AM
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reply to post by fiftyfifty
 



On asking him what it was like, he told me he can't remember anything about it. No OBE's or lights
Maybe because it was not the time for him to feel what is death.



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 08:22 AM
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Originally posted by diamondsmith
and don't gave it a try,the call for each of us will come but we don't know when.


Indeed I wont give it a try, I was saying I would give the question a try my friend diamondsmith. I agree the time when, is unknown for the most part by the that is experiencing it and shouldn't be forced or rushed by the experiencer.. I compacted the time period keeping in mind various forms of death or switching plains and the endorphin-Dimethyltryptamine (dmt) and adrenaline releases in the human body along with other chemical releases. I do also feel if many understood more about the EXISTENCE PHASES of LIFE and DEATH there would be less FEAR and possibly more positive relations between ALL if they knew some who behaved in a negative manner didnt do well on the other realms/dimensional plains.



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 08:26 AM
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reply to post by luciddream
 
That is a good answer,



TextAbstract Near-death experiences (NDE's) can be reproduced by ketamine via blockade of receptors in the brain (the N-methyl-D-aspartate, NMDA receptors) for the neurotransmitter glutamate. Conditions which precipitate NDE's (hypoxia, ischaemia, hypoglycaemia, temporal lobe epilepsy etc.) have been shown to release a flood of glutamate, overactivating NMDA receptors resulting in neuro ('excito') toxicity. Ketamine prevents this neurotoxicity. There are substances in the brain which bind to the same receptor site as ketamine. Conditions which trigger a glutamate flood may also trigger a flood of neuroprotective agents which bind to NMDA receptors to protect cells, leading to an altered state of consciousness like that produced by ketamine. This article extends and updates the theory proposed in 1990 (Jansen, 1990b). Introduction The near-death experience (NDE) is a phenomenon of considerable importance to medicine, neuroscience, neurology, psychiatry, philosophy and religon (Stevenson and Greyson, 1979; Greyson and Stevenson, 1980; Ring, 1980; Sabom, 1982; Jansen, 1989a,b, 1990b). Unfortunately, some scientists have been deterred from conducting research upon the NDE by claims that NDE's are evidence for life after death, and sensationalist media reports which impart the air of a pseudoscience to NDE studies. Irrespective of religous beliefs, NDE's are not evidence for life after death on simple logical grounds: death is defined as the final, irreversible end. Anyone who 'returned' did not, by definition, die - although their mind, brain and body may have been in a very unusual state. There is overwhelming evidence that 'mind' results from neuronal activity. The dramatic effects on the mind of adding hallucinogenic drugs to the brain, and the religous experiences which sometimes result, provide further evidence for this (Grinspoon and Bakalar, 1981). One of the many contradictions which 'after-lifers' can not resolve is that "the spirit rises out of the body leaving the brain behind, but somehow still incorporating neuronal functions such as sight, hearing, and proprioception" (Morse, 1989, original italics). All features of a classic NDE can be reproduced by the intravenous administration of 50 - 100 mg of ketamine (Domino et al., 1965; Rumpf ,1969; Collier, 1972; Siegel,1978, 1980,1981; Stafford, 1977; Lilly, 1978; Grinspoon and Bakalar, 1981; White, 1982; Ghoniem et al., 1985; Sputz, 1989; Jansen, 1989a,b, 1990b, 1993). There is increasing evidence which suggests that the reproduction of NDE's by ketamine is unlikely to be a coincidence. This evidence includes the discovery of the major neuronal binding site for ketamine, known as the phencyclidine (PCP) binding site of the NMDA receptor (Thomson et al., 1985), the importance of NMDA receptors in the cerebral cortex, particularly in the temporal and frontal lobes, the key role of these sites in cognitive processing, memory, and perception, their role in epilepsy, psychoses, hypoxic/ischaemic and epileptic cell damage (excitotoxicity), the prevention of this damage by ketamine, the discovery of substances in the brain called 'endopsychosins' which bind to the same site as ketamine, and the role of ions such as magnesium and zinc in regulating the site (Anis et al., 1983; Quirion et al., 1984; Simon et al., 1984; Benveniste et al., 1984; Ben-Ari,1985; Thomson, 1986; Coan and Collingridge, 1987; Collingridge, 1987; Contreras et al., 1987; Rothman et al., 1987; Mody et al., 1987; Quirion et al., 1987; Westbrook and Mayer, 1987; Sonders et al., 1988; Barnes,1988; Choi,1988; Monaghan et al., 1989; Jansen et al., 1989a,b,c, 1990a,b,c, 1991a,b,c, 1993). Characteristic Features of the Near-Death Experience There is no internationally determined and agreed set of criteria which define the NDE, no list of 'research diagnostic criteria' similar to those provided by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) for psychiatric disorders. This lack has allowed some critics of neurobiological models to dismiss these models because some particular criterion which they believe to be important may not have been fully accounted for by the model being proposed, although it may well be that a consensus, statistical definition of the key features of the NDE would not include those features - just as, for example, the APA definition of schizophrenia (1980) represents an international consensus and avoids the sectarian views of a few, or inclusion of obscure cases which do not meet the general rule. source(www.mindspring.com...



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 08:34 AM
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reply to post by rom12345
 

Lama: “As a Buddhist, I view death as a normal process, a reality that I accept will occur as long as I remain in this earthly existence. Knowing that I cannot escape it, I see no point in worrying about it. I tend to think of death as being like changing your clothes when they are old and worn out, rather than as some final end.”
source(www.holybooks.com...

Very interesting concept,but it's more theoretical then a describe of the physical experience,but very good image from a different culture.



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 08:38 AM
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What do you think humans feel in the exact moment of death?,


Probably depends on the person.

The athiest will be expecting nothing but will get a surprise. The self rightous fundamentalist ________ (fill in religion of choice) will be expecting instant paradise or a long 'sleep' in the grave to be awakened by a trumpet blast at the end of the world (depending on which fundamentalist religion they belong to) but will get a surprise. People who think they were good enough and just skated through life will be expecting to do the same at death, but will get a surprise. People who think they weren't good enough and who think their efforts were worthless will be expecting hellfire, but will probably get a surprise. People who expect instant reincarnation and total memory loss of this life, will probably get a surprise.

What people feel at the moment of death ... I'm thinking generally it's 'surprise' for most people.

I'm expecting to feel relief. When the time comes I'll probably be surprised too ...



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 08:39 AM
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reply to post by Ophiuchus 13
 



EXISTENCE PHASES of LIFE and DEATH there would be less FEAR and possibly more positive relations between ALL if they knew some who behaved in a negative manner didnt do well on the other realms/dimensional plains.
That is true, but I do not think if they knew, the beast in man quench the thirst of blood that has.



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 08:46 AM
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reply to post by mrperplexed
 



TextI can tell you there certainly was a period of nothingness, and in between the nothingness and consciousness, there is, for lack of a better term, "cognitive reasoning" where your brain is lucid and you basically have a choice to live or not.. It feels that your consciousness is separated from your body, I remember it clearly and is really for another thread.... But to answer your question, in my experience I was aware i was dying, and the actual moment of death was not bad at all.. rather one of the most serene moments was in that minute I was holding my breath, knowing I had nothing left in my life to fear..
An impressive story, and a very real one.Maybe the desire to live as better persons becomes stronger than the desire to do harm after we read about such experiences.Thank you for your true story.



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 08:51 AM
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reply to post by FlyersFan
 



surprise
You're right, you can do good deeds but one sin that you do not know and go to hell, or you can have evil and one good deed and ye go to heaven.But you never know which is which.



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 08:51 AM
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My son collapsed and was simply out of his body, the entire room as if daylight, and he was very alert, said he could hear a pin drop miles away. He was given a choice to return or stay.

I think it varies. My grandmother said, everything was fading quickly. With anohter, the entire room lit up and brightened enormously.

In "Alex, the Life of a Child", she said, Oh Boy Which Way Do I Go?



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 08:51 AM
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I think if you are unconscious before death occurs, then you feel nothing, like you are in a deep sleep and unaware.

If you are conscious and slowly fade away, I can image the chemicals released in your brain will produce a peaceful dreamlike state to help you cope with your coming demise.

One thing is for sure, nobody in this thread will be able to give you the answer you seek until it happens to them, in which case it will be too late to share the experience, an NDE and death after all will be two different experiences.

Once death has occurred you will either cease to be, or hopefully something is after all this, even if it is doing it all over again.



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 08:58 AM
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reply to post by Unity_99
 



I think it varies. My grandmother said, everything was fading quickly. With anohter, the entire room lit up and brightened enormously.
Well it may be,but I think for the good people as for the bad people is the same before the judgement.



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 09:02 AM
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reply to post by woogleuk
 



One thing is for sure, nobody in this thread will be able to give you the answer you seek until it happens to them, in which case it will be too late to share the experience, an NDE and death after all will be two different experiences.
Well let's all stay safe,We don't need someone to experience anything,maybe after we die we can transmit through dreams to those we love a message of our experience..



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 09:12 AM
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reply to post by diamondsmith
 


My grandmother was a saint. She cared about all the suffering in the world and the world's children daily, very good person. For some they're just out, and for others they go through a process, fade to dark, then suddenly light, and the journey out. But for alotof the NDE's they 're just out suddenly.

No the process varies enormously. There is no one way. And there is no waiting for judgment day. The people who go through the tunnel or into the light are all going on to something positive.

The ones who are gravity based having harmed seriously, they get pulled away. They are pulled down. They can't stand in the frequency of the light and are pulled away by those in gravity. There are many reports of people working in ER's and hospitals, we are magnetized by our frequency.

And while fundamentalists have dogmas and credo's fed them,:

Ecclesiastes 12:6-7

Remember him--before the silver cord is severed, or the golden bowl is broken; before the pitcher is shattered at the spring, or the wheel broken at the well, and the dust returns to the ground it came from, and the spirit returns to God who gave it.

This is one passage that refers to something only those who obe talk of, the silver cord and that when you die its severed, again something only astral guidelines talk of or common knowledge.

There are other passages too, ie. Genesis 32; 30 all about the pineal where he has seen God, and symbolically the many frequency realms, in Jacob's Ladder.

We don't get the same life, we don't have the same NDE's even. Every soul is as unique as snowflake and we're becoming. And while we sharing this experience, to some extent, each and every one of us is in a private room and our experiences are interactive.

ie. I'm missing the sun, it cuts through the clouds. When will the birds come back, missing bird song, they're back next morning, and than a few hours later. Its interactive simulated reality. A school and we're all different.
Not every time, but its happened enough that I just awed by interactive quality of life. And seeking whats most important, and seeing the world is more important than anything else you can do except for doing what we can to make the world a better place for others. Love and Seeing Through the World and Seeking.

We're all meant to search too, to seek within. To overcome our weaknesses and care about others. To raise our frequency. Which often involves Faith in Love and Goodness helping.

And we don't have the same experiences, not even in death.
edit on 4-1-2012 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 09:13 AM
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My intuition tells me that in the last moment I live, I will feel a "cleansing", a sensation I could only describe as like cold fire spreading throughout my body, originating at the core. What happens next I haven't the faintest idea, but I hope that my consciousness, my spirit, will be lifted into another, more "perfect" reality.



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