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A short video about war crimes in the Congo that everyone needs to see

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posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 04:43 AM
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I ran across this short film made by the Save The Congo foundation. Much of the current fighting is over possession of various mineral deposits. These are essential for all modern electronics, and are rare except in a few locations (The Congo being one.) One of the main weapons used by soldiers in both factions torture, murder, and especially rape.

This video is based off the experience of particular woman and her family, and horribly enough they actually made it less explicit even though the film is still horribly violent. It is set in England to give westerners a way to understand how terrible conditions are there, but in a familiar setting. The film is very graphic, and very disturbing, but it is something everyone should see to really understand the horrors going on there.

STC has a petition that is trying to enact legislation similar to laws about blood diamonds, only in this instance it is blood minerals. The top link is where the video is. You do not have to watch the video to sign, and the link will not take you straight to the movie. Again, this is not something kids or those who have experienced similar trauma should see.

www.unwatchable.cc...
savethecongo.co.uk...




posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 05:19 AM
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Other than I am glad to be made aware of this I don't really know what else to say.
It makes me sick sometimes, to see the horrors humanity is capable of, it really does.

My constant bitching and complaining to others about the cell phone industry is finally justified.
I am always wondering why cell manufacturers need to come out with 10 different cell phones a month, and now I see the price some people are paying for their greed. Just sick!


Sadly I think this thread might get deleted idk, I really hope it doesn't cause I certainly think it's important for this information to get out. I for one was unaware until now.
I happily signed.



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 05:34 AM
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Originally posted by ShadowLink
Other than I am glad to be made aware of this I don't really know what else to say.
It makes me sick sometimes, to see the horrors humanity is capable of, it really does.

My constant bitching and complaining to others about the cell phone industry is finally justified.
I am always wondering why cell manufacturers need to come out with 10 different cell phones a month, and now I see the price some people are paying for their greed. Just sick!


Sadly I think this thread might get deleted idk, I really hope it doesn't cause I certainly think it's important for this information to get out. I for one was unaware until now.
I happily signed.


Thanks for signing. I hope it doesn't, either since I'm not promoting anything for my own benefit. I pride myself on keeping abreast of all sorts of geopolitical shenanigans, but I had no idea the conflict was this brutal or systematic. It can be so easy to dissociate yourself emotionally from crimes that happen in third world countries. I think the mentality that Africa always has something horrible going on is ubiquitous in western society so horrible films like this perform an important service.

What's really amazing is the interview with the women whose tragedy was used as a template. She's amazingly strong, and what she went through was even worse than the video.



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 05:39 AM
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Completely agree.

I haven't watched any of the other videos yet, perhaps tomorrow, I am certainly interested and will look over the rest of the site tomorrow.

Also, the second link is not working, in case you were unaware.
[NVM, appears the page is suspended]
edit on 4-1-2012 by ShadowLink because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 05:54 AM
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Originally posted by ShadowLink
Completely agree.

I haven't watched any of the other videos yet, perhaps tomorrow, I am certainly interested and will look over the rest of the site tomorrow.

Also, the second link is not working, in case you were unaware.
[NVM, appears the page is suspended]
edit on 4-1-2012 by ShadowLink because: (no reason given)


I think they might have ran over their allowed bandwith.



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 05:56 AM
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well this is sickening
, but how do you express a desire to the manufacturers of your electronic goods that you would like to buy a conflict free product when it becomes available if i may ask ?

as far as i know those vicious people who are committing these kind of crimes sell the products to east asia and buy weapons with that money , so the arms industry is involved .

edit to add this video

edit on 4-1-2012 by Dr UAE because: adding a video



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 06:32 AM
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Originally posted by Dr UAE
well this is sickening
, but how do you express a desire to the manufacturers of your electronic goods that you would like to buy a conflict free product when it becomes available if i may ask ?

as far as i know those vicious people who are committing these kind of crimes sell the products to east asia and buy weapons with that money , so the arms industry is involved .

edit to add this video

edit on 4-1-2012 by Dr UAE because: adding a video


There's a petition on the website to create laws that require tracking of the materials (similar to the blood diamond laws.) From what I understand they will keep pushing legislation. The video was made to give people a visceral understanding of what was going on so they don't ignore as 'just' another African civil war.



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 06:57 AM
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reply to post by Equidae
 


As graphic the 5 minute video was, I'm pleased the made it using caucasian actors to give them a sense of whats going on in the Congo and many other nations - and not just for blood diamonds and blood rare minerals.

It's time we all demanded we know where all our mobile, TV and computer parts come from, right from the minerals down to the factory workers!

But will you? Or will you continue to close your eyes to this dispicable disgrace and purchase these items regardless?



posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 04:12 AM
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reply to post by Dr UAE
 


Those companies are spouting a load of BS. If something as insular and tradition bound as the diamond industry can institute a tracking system, then surely electronics companies (many of whom pride themselves on innovation) can do something similar.





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