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Scientists find sea floor 'bridges' across the Mariana trench - the deepest place on earth.

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posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 09:31 AM
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I just stumbled across this piece and i did a search and didnt find any postings so forgive me if i am wrong.




Marine geophysicists from the University of New Hampshire have found huge 'bridges' across the Mariana trench, which cross the trench about a mile above the bottom. The bridges are created when mountains on the sea floor are pulled into the earth's crust by enormous geological forces. The mountains, sticking up from the Pacific ocean plate, form 'bridges' as the the Pacific plate disappears into the earth's crust under the neighbouring Philippine plate. 'It wasn't common knowledge these bridges occurred at all,' said James Gardner, a University of New Hampshire scientist who found the structures. Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk...


Pretty amazing if i dare say so myself, considering i believe that while we are aiming to the skies in the quest of finding evidence for many things we simply forget about the fact that the oceans are basically yet to be discovered.








posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 09:41 AM
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you know whats funny
i made a thread on this thing the other day

www.abovetopsecret.com...

It makes perfect sense that all the wonders are at the bottom of the oceans



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 09:41 AM
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Bridges...?
not sure I understand
are they talking Artificial structures...
or like underwater land bridges..?



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 09:44 AM
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Originally posted by admiralmary
you know whats funny
i made a thread on this thing the other day

www.abovetopsecret.com...

It makes perfect sense that all the wonders are at the bottom of the oceans


Yes i remember reading it and when i came across this it reminded me of your thread.



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 09:52 AM
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reply to post by Lee78
 


S&F I am too tired to give this thread the attention it deserves but I am marking it to return. Great find. I remember reading somewhere we have only mapped out and visibility witnessed what amounts to 2% of our oceans and they make up 3/4 of the planet. According to that we know very little about most of Earth. We probably know more about other planets.



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 09:56 AM
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reply to post by Lee78
 


Oh no, it doesn't ... the force in question is on one side, and it's going down, there is no force (according to subduction theory) that would push so hard on the other side of the trench, as to have these mountaineous regions collapse over the trench.

One more, for Expanding earth theory ...



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 10:16 AM
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I just want to see if I am reading this right. Earth sucked down these mountains some, which turned them on their sides, so the pointy mountain tops are now facing each other, with some connecting, and those connecting points are the bridges they are speaking of?
I've been reading a ton tonight, so my brain is currently fried. Apologies.

Also, what does this have to do with ancient & lost civilizations?
edit on 1/2/2012 by digitalbluco because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 10:27 AM
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reply to post by spoonbender
 


read the OP people!!

This is provided 3 sentences into the very first post.




The bridges are created when mountains on the sea floor are pulled into the earth's crust by enormous geological forces.

so do you only read the first 2 lines of any thread?



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 10:53 AM
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It's a process of subduction that takes millions of years, give or take - the same forces that allow continents to 'drift'. I'm more interested in the finding that life can still cling to some of these undersea mounts within the trench, 6 miles down.



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 12:58 PM
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Interesting find indeed.

The O.P is right about our Sea's and Oceans, there are aspects about them that truly boggle the mind that are only now surfacing (pun intended). Take for instance this bit of news from August 2010.

Undersea river discovered flowing on sea bed


Researchers working in the Black Sea have found currents of water 350 times greater than the River Thames flowing along the sea bed, carving out channels much like a river on the land. The undersea river, which is up to 115ft deep in places, even has rapids and waterfalls much like its terrestrial equivalents. If found on land, scientists estimate it would be the world's sixth largest river in terms of the amount of water flowing through it.


I'm still waiting for scientists to find Megalodon's deep within the Oceans!



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 01:06 PM
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OK....Way left field and out of the box....but there are at least a couple of good visual charts here
poleshift.ning.com...

Rainbows
Jane



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 04:21 PM
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Originally posted by Blackmarketeer
It's a process of subduction that takes millions of years, give or take - the same forces that allow continents to 'drift'. I'm more interested in the finding that life can still cling to some of these undersea mounts within the trench, 6 miles down.


This is just retarded. More nonsense about plates and subduction and continental drift. So, mountains getting sucked into the earth, turning sideways, and forming bridges across canyons to another plate. Am I the only one who thinks that sounds pretty fanciful? And how come there is nothing like that on the land. Ever. Anywhere.

Yet it is true, we know almost nothing about the oceans. We are far more familiar with the Moon than the bottom of the ocean. Only about two percent of it is explored, and it's 75 percent of the planet.



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 04:22 PM
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reply to post by Freelancer
 


Now, what exactly causes 'rivers' to exist underwater? Doesn't that kind of defy common thinking?

Is it caused by colder water sinking to the bottom or is it just ocean currents on the bottom causing the appearance of a 'river'?

Interesting read, and a pretty awesome thread. S&F



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 04:33 PM
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Originally posted by spoonbender
Bridges...?
not sure I understand
are they talking Artificial structures...
or like underwater land bridges..?






Did you even read the article? Might want to try that next time before posting.







It is very interesting and amazing just how little we know about the deep.



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 08:46 PM
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And I JUST saw a report about ancient underwater complexes that are several thousand feet deep (approx. 10 000!!) just of the coast of Japan and the Caribiean. Whats funny is that these Complexes out of stone are pretty close to the bermuda and dragons triangle. Its exciting to uncover such long lost wonders.



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 08:58 PM
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Originally posted by spoonbender
Bridges...?
not sure I understand
are they talking Artificial structures...
or like underwater land bridges..?


how can they be land bridges if its underwater???

Dry water anybody?

Its 2012 happy new year



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 08:59 PM
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Originally posted by spoonbender
Bridges...?
not sure I understand
are they talking Artificial structures...
or like underwater land bridges..?

Good question, I would like to know the answer to that.



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 09:37 PM
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Originally posted by CaptChaos

This is just retarded. More nonsense about plates and subduction and continental drift. So, mountains getting sucked into the earth, turning sideways, and forming bridges across canyons to another plate. Am I the only one who thinks that sounds pretty fanciful? And how come there is nothing like that on the land. Ever. Anywhere.

Yet it is true, we know almost nothing about the oceans. We are far more familiar with the Moon than the bottom of the ocean. Only about two percent of it is explored, and it's 75 percent of the planet.

Hmmmmm ... I know next to nothing regarding long term geological processes occurring under the deepest parts of the oceans but I'm leaning towards agreeing with you CaptChaos that the amount of "fine tuning" and "complex coordination" required to achieve this beggars the imagination.

So, let me see if I have understood the process of creating these particular undersea bridges:
(1) we have 2 mountains being subducted into the mantle AT THE SAME RATE/TIME
(2) then being turned on their sides AT THE SAME RATE/TIME
(3) then being rotated so that their peaks face each other AT THE SAME RATE/TIME
(4) and the peaks just happen to come in contact with each other JUST ENOUGH to join together physically.
(5) and this happens not once but a number of times ?

If you asked me prior to this "discovery", I would have said the odds of such a thing happening just once being essentially ZERO ... and happening MORE than once even closer to zero.

Look, I'm one of science's biggest fans but at some point even I have to ask how the heck these scientists come up with such incredulous explanations



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 10:31 PM
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Plate tectonics theory is full of holes, and this is just another example of finding the "impossible", and explaining it with ridiculous stories that can't possibly be true.

Anyone who can explain how a less dense material (crust) can be dragged into a more dense material (mantle), please step up and give us all a lesson in your new physics.

I don't know if these things are real, and if they are, what the explanation is, but I know that it is not possible to push the Earth's crust into the Earth's mantle.



posted on Jan, 3 2012 @ 01:00 AM
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reply to post by Lee78
 


Thanks good read. I have always kept a eye out for information on the Mariana trench ever since I read about it being the deepest place on earth way back in school.
I wonder if there are any pictures or sonar graph thingy.



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