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posted on Apr, 13 2003 @ 10:25 PM
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I need a new one, the grocery store sucks.

What kind of well paying job can a 19 year old get that pays enough so he can get his own apartment and afford auto insurance? My future looks aweful right now. I have no plans on continuing my college education. Dont think im learning much there they dont teach me job skills.




posted on Apr, 13 2003 @ 10:27 PM
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Stay in college.

Employers are more impressed that you finished, than they are in what you learned.

(By the way, I'm an "employer")



posted on Apr, 13 2003 @ 10:28 PM
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i'm only 15, can't find a job period! new york sucks for jobs. upstate especially. william, what kind of employment?



posted on Apr, 13 2003 @ 10:32 PM
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I agree, stay in college. The biggest mistake I ever made was dropping out of college, you have so many more options with that piece of paper. I have had more jobs than you could imagine before I found something that I was good at and fairly enjoyed (how many people actually enjoy working?) At 19, you have plenty of time to figure out which way to go.



posted on Apr, 13 2003 @ 10:44 PM
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Originally posted by phoenix_cross
william, what kind of employment?


I run the online/digital group of a fair-sized advertising agency.

I interview lots of people every month. While talent matters the most, the fact that someone demonstrates an ability to complete college is an exceptional advantage. When you're right out of college, I know you're green... and probably don't know much at all... but I do know you have an ability to learn... and that's most important.



posted on Apr, 13 2003 @ 10:50 PM
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actually, i'm not doing too well in school. while it's only my freshman year of high school, i've had a lot of personal problems. not really like fighting, but self problems. i felt like anything i would do was pointless, and i was constrained, so i didn't do my schoolwork, and stuf like that. i've came close to running away to look for a cause, but that'd be pointless. i've never actually been able to study the things i want, or learn the logic i see to make sense. homework is illogical when it doesn't tell you what it can be used for. i don't know why i'm learning how to simplify divide, and multiply rational expressions? that's my problem. i need to figure out how to turn myself around, and have little incentive to do so because of my personal state.



posted on Apr, 14 2003 @ 10:32 PM
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Well, as much of a disservice that I think most colleges and universities do to their students, I have to agree, STAY IN SCHOOL.

If nothing else, that piece of paper that say DIPLOMA on it is the key to several doors. As William says, most employers know if you are straight out of college you really dont know anything in terms of true job skills, and they will need to essentially retrain you from whatever the college finished pouring in your head for the last 4 or so years. However, without that diploma, you are essentially off the street, and nearly useless in terms of any kind of high level job.

So yes, please do stay in school.

If you have any serious job asperations in a specific field, certainly study that field in school, but also go to some known employers in that field. Tell them you are college student and start applying for apprenticeships/internships. The money isnt that great, but you will be getting valuable job related skills for that field you otherwise wouldnt be getting in school.



posted on Apr, 14 2003 @ 10:56 PM
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if there is no reason to start up or join a resistance movement before then, i'd like to go to UK or UT. if i get really smart i may try and apply to the USAFA but i know i'll never get into that place.



posted on Apr, 14 2003 @ 11:02 PM
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if i get really smart i may try and apply to the USAFA but i know i'll never get into that place. Posted by Pheonix Cross

Hey, dont sell yourself short! Just because you are uneducated in a certain field should NEVER be mistaken for not being smart.

Learning is a process, and it has a lot to do with interest. I know I did horribly in fields I had little to no interest in. Your learning aptitude is going to vary with what your interests are.

Dont give up, keep the faith. Find what you really want to do (which is often the hardest part for any college student) and persue it. Dont loose faith if you hit hard spots, because they will always be there. It feels good when you get over them


Also keep in mind where you are going. Have a clear goal, and also keep in mind what about your interests are going to be marketable and can be used and exploited in the job market.

Dont give up, thats the worst thing you can do!



posted on Apr, 14 2003 @ 11:07 PM
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noble words! however i aspire to be more than the average joe who pursues money. i want to change the way things are done, and open the horizons of all mankind, not just to a select few who can pay their way to success. all man is equal, like it or not, and we all must realise this somehow. education and understanding of ourselves is neccessary. it's even harder for a high school student like me.



posted on Apr, 14 2003 @ 11:15 PM
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however i aspire to be more than the average joe who pursues money. i want to change the way things are done, and open the horizons of all mankind, not just to a select few who can pay their way to success. all man is equal, like it or not, and we all must realise this somehow. education and understanding of ourselves is neccessary. it's even harder for a high school student like me. Posted by Pheonix Cross

Very noble intentions, and I certainly applaude you for them! I also will not do anything to dissuade you from this train of thought. However, I would caution you to keep a bit of reality tucked in your pocket.

Just remember, regardless of how idealogical your intentions, you still have to survive in modern society, and that means money.

But, one should always strive to obtain a position where you are able to help those around you, change what you can, and still maintain yourself in such a way to keep from being depressed



posted on Apr, 14 2003 @ 11:19 PM
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that's why i'm searching for those who have the same aspiration. two men is stronger than any I and an organisation is stronger than any couple. politics, business, it's all possible, use the business for politics. win iffice in local, state and federal, then be successful!



posted on Apr, 14 2003 @ 11:33 PM
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This may sound rather odd ( it is based upon a great deal of experience); but -while a college/university education is a good thing: in the Western world at least there is another avenue that is increasingly neglected.
This is to acquire a trade or craft (used to be called an apprenticeship in the UK).
Essentially, a good plumber, electrician or mechanic (to name but three) can pretty much name his or her own price.
I cannot speak for the US; but in Europe and Canada we are already seeing immigration of tradesmen and craftsmen from the former Iron Curtain countries. They're d*mned good, and work for very little.
I'm a product of academe myself; but I've never taken the view that getting one's hands dirty is somehow a career failure.



posted on Apr, 14 2003 @ 11:34 PM
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Incidentally, the Armed Forces remain one of the best training grounds (and certainly the best paid) for learning a trade or craft.



posted on Apr, 14 2003 @ 11:39 PM
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probably owuld have tried to be SF. but after i learned the tricks of the government, i swore i'd never fight for such a power. not this regime anyway. if something were done to inform not decieve the people i'd stand for this nation. only true patriot.

as for apprentice system. i think it's kinda the same with an internship, just a more fancy word for it. it is indeed rare to find a shop to something similar, where the owner simply takes you under his wing. it happens more with people your family knows than out of the blue like it used to be. very remniscent of early america.



posted on Apr, 14 2003 @ 11:40 PM
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I'm a product of academe myself; but I've never taken the view that getting one's hands dirty is somehow a career failure. Posted by Estragon

Very much agreed! From my experience at interviewing and getting jobs, if you can demonstrate that you can do a job, they actually dont look too far into your degree other than if you got one or not.

Incidentally, the Armed Forces remain one of the best training grounds (and certainly the best paid) for learning a trade or craft. Posted by Estragon

Also agreed, and you will likely get much more intensive training than what you will get in civilian life. Indeed, you will find training in the military you cannot get anywhere else.

Of course, you have to wonder just where the hell you might end up if you go this route.



posted on Apr, 15 2003 @ 05:16 AM
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pfft ... I quit in the 9th grade cuz I was seriously learning nothing. The public school's I used to goto suck big time. Even the teacher's were afraid of certain student's back then. 6 month's after that, got my GED through job corps. Even though they lied to me to get me in there. Told me I was going for computer programing and placed me in business/clerical. 5 1/2 year's after that ... I'm married, have two bratty kid's and a semi-good job that I enjoy.



posted on Apr, 15 2003 @ 08:17 AM
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First off, hello all... Vacations are nice but it is good to be home...

Now on to the topic.
I would have to say, STAY IN SCHOOL... For many reasons. One of which is the many cool people you meet in college, not to mention the parties... but on the serious side, even if its not for the extra money, it opens up many possibilities. Take me for instance, I am one of the very few people who are intentionally taking a pay cut.
I have been working in advertising for the past year and am now going back to my true enjoyment... Journalism. It is one of the best things in the world to actually enjoy going to work.
I have worked the high paying (high stress) jobs, but found that even though I made plenty of money, I didn't have time to spend it.
Now I take it easy, work 25 or so hours a week, have time to coach my daughter's t-ball team, etc., yet still get the bills paid, something that I would have never had time for, had I not went to college.
P.S. Even if you decide to get your G.E.D. go to college...
I left High School to my G.E.D. and then went to college. Still maintained my honor's scholarships, just as if I had graduated, just didn't have to wait for my senior year.



posted on Apr, 15 2003 @ 11:43 AM
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Originally posted by Estragon
This may sound rather odd ( it is based upon a great deal of experience); but -while a college/university education is a good thing: in the Western world at least there is another avenue that is increasingly neglected.
This is to acquire a trade or craft (used to be called an apprenticeship in the UK).
Essentially, a good plumber, electrician or mechanic (to name but three) can pretty much name his or her own price.
I cannot speak for the US; but in Europe and Canada we are already seeing immigration of tradesmen and craftsmen from the former Iron Curtain countries. They're d*mned good, and work for very little.
I'm a product of academe myself; but I've never taken the view that getting one's hands dirty is somehow a career failure.


I agree completely with this sentiment and I am also in process of becoming a product of academe. Alot of my family work in trades and make much more than I do. Everyone has incredible apptitudes in SOMETHING.. the trick is to find out yours then find one you like and hone it to fine edge so that you are the best in your field.


[Edited on 15-4-2003 by observer]



posted on Apr, 15 2003 @ 11:45 AM
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Join the Army Reserves. You don't have to fight if you don't want to.


That's what I did.





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