Proper Form Using The M4 Carbine

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posted on Jan, 5 2012 @ 01:17 PM
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reply to post by projectvxn
 


Good Stuff! I often see people at the range who just treat their weapons like they have minds of their own. Especially new handgun shooters. I don't often see black rifle shooters in the indoor range.

On that note, I strongly suggest that people explore the principles and opportunities presented by the Appleseed Project and the RWVA.

www.backwoodshome.com...

I put together a Liberty Training Rifle some time ago and the principles learned with it easily carry over to a traditional AR platform especially when using Tech Sights and a USGI sling.

appleseedproject.blogspot.com...

Practice Practice Practice!!

Cheers!!





posted on Jan, 5 2012 @ 04:47 PM
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reply to post by projectvxn
 


Good thread mate--- You were really "getting into the gun." May I suggest something that I learned from Matt Burkett's excellent --- Shotgun Mastery --- DVD. --- You should shoot at least a string of six rapid fire rounds, to see if the shotgun is rocking you back. If it is--- adjust you body more.

May I add --- That you should have the majority of your weight on the ball's of your feet --- as you did in the vid.

I noticed that your support hand on the vertical foregrip, was alittle to low, thus introducing more torque from the recoil of the gun. May I suggest something that I learned from--- Magpul --- Art of the AR-15 --- Instead of gripping the foregrip --- Grip your hand on the forearm, just ahead of the foregrip, using the vertical foregrip as a location point, for the rear portion of your hand. Lock both wrists, the same as you would hold a pistol; with your index finger on your support hand on the forearm pointed at the target. This position --- if you are not using SWAT or SEAL positions can allow you to raise your support elbow, into a higher position so you can get into the gun better.

Some Three Gunners, don't use the vertical foregrip at all.



posted on Jan, 7 2012 @ 10:56 PM
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Originally posted by vogon42
reply to post by projectvxn
 

Good luck to you, and thank your for your commitment to our freedom.


I'd like to take this belated opportunity to echo the above statement. Good luck, projectvxn. You will be missed. Come back when you have some free time to say hello.



posted on Jan, 8 2012 @ 07:37 PM
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Originally posted by projectvxn
reply to post by NoClue206
 


I'm good at both. But I'll be honing those skills in basic starting Monday morning when I head out to Ft. Benning.

See ya at the range.
edit on 31-12-2011 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)


Take it to 'em, buddy. Be safe.

/TOA



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 03:00 PM
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A few helpful hints on the art of AR-15 form, can be taken from Jerry Muculek's AR-15 dvd. You can order it from Brownells.

Good luck to the OP,

Erno86



posted on Feb, 9 2012 @ 08:25 PM
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Originally posted by LeLeu
You guys are lucky. Aussies were disarmed by their government
so we're not allow to play with those toys.
But I do always like to watch videos of women shooting, especially
when they hurt themselves


This one is the best



Happy new year fella's
TOODLES!!!



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 12:59 AM
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Originally posted by Aliensun
It is impossible to sight any long gun without tilting your head (and neck).
You still of your vid clearly shows that you are doing exactly what you claim you don't do.


WRONG. Have you ever heard of cheek weld? If you are tilting your head and neck when you are shooting any assault rifle, you are doing it wrong. 4 years in the Marines and 2 tours in Iraq says that its not impossible. I even use this technique shooting hunting rifles and shotguns to this day. The only time that you really have to tilt your neck is if you are shooting from the prone or sitting position. If you are up in the combat ready, and you know what you are doing, all you should have to do is bring the weapon up into your shoulder and put the stock into your cheek, your body will do the rest. No need to tilt your head or neck.



posted on Feb, 10 2012 @ 01:03 AM
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Originally posted by Erno86
reply to post by projectvxn
 


Good thread mate--- You were really "getting into the gun." May I suggest something that I learned from Matt Burkett's excellent --- Shotgun Mastery --- DVD. --- You should shoot at least a string of six rapid fire rounds, to see if the shotgun is rocking you back. If it is--- adjust you body more.

May I add --- That you should have the majority of your weight on the ball's of your feet --- as you did in the vid.

I noticed that your support hand on the vertical foregrip, was alittle to low, thus introducing more torque from the recoil of the gun. May I suggest something that I learned from--- Magpul --- Art of the AR-15 --- Instead of gripping the foregrip --- Grip your hand on the forearm, just ahead of the foregrip, using the vertical foregrip as a location point, for the rear portion of your hand. Lock both wrists, the same as you would hold a pistol; with your index finger on your support hand on the forearm pointed at the target. This position --- if you are not using SWAT or SEAL positions can allow you to raise your support elbow, into a higher position so you can get into the gun better.

Some Three Gunners, don't use the vertical foregrip at all.



^^Good tips. I personally don't like foregrips, I'd much rather use an angle grip, or just grip the base of the magazine well. The only problem with this is that most foreign made assault rifles don't use a protruding magazine well like the m4 and variants. I find that when I use foregrips, I tend to focus too much on putting pressure on the foregrip, when in all reality all you should be using the foregrip to do is maintain proper front sight post alignment, your rear grip should be what you use to pull the weapon into your shoulder, which also helps maintain positive trigger control.



posted on Feb, 11 2012 @ 10:15 AM
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reply to post by beautyndissonance
 


I'm sorry.... but I was slightly wrong on the Magpul DVD method. Chris Costa, from Magpul, suggests that the support hand thumb should be pointed towards the target. Matt Burkett's shotgun style, is the support hand index finger should be pointed towards the target. Magpul sells a pretty good angled foregrip, but I have not used one yet.



posted on Feb, 12 2012 @ 08:55 AM
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reply to post by projectvxn
 


Good Luck! Long Live the Infantry!



posted on Feb, 12 2012 @ 09:24 AM
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just wanted to say, good videos on improving your shooting accuracy. however, because you are using an m4 and not bolt action, i wanted to share one tip i feel you left out. it does help accuracy and its a little m4 or m16 secret. place the tip of your nose on the charging handle. dont squash it or anything, just lightly. remember that spot. now you will have virtually the same sight picture everytime. just my two cents. i am a veteran, served in kuwait in 04 with the army, so i know a little about em.



posted on Jun, 3 2012 @ 02:13 PM
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reply to post by mactheaxe
 


They teach ya that trick in basic. I've always used camo tape to ensure my cheek is always in the same spot. Works just as well if you don't want your nose on the charging handle.



posted on Jun, 4 2012 @ 08:02 PM
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There's essentially no 'right' form untill you specify what your trying to accomplish.

But I will say this method is the provides the most muzzle control, speed, and consistency.



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 01:32 PM
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reply to post by vogon42
 


Went through when I did. They don't train "every soldier is a rifleman" anymore. But I can say before any deployment they will get plenty of trigger time.

My father was ex Army, so I learned to shoot before I ever went in. Shot Expert thanks to him.

The 1911A-1 the best pistol ever made. My first sidearm to qualify on.



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 01:01 AM
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Originally posted by murphy22
reply to post by vogon42
 


They don't train "every soldier is a rifleman" anymore


That's because every soldier isn't a rifleman. I think the "Regular" Army could learn a little bit from the Marine Corps. They should teach their soldiers how to adjust the dope on their weapons out to 500 yards and focus more on fundamentals. Are you going to actually engage out to 500 yards? No. But If you have the skillset to hit @ 500 yards consistantly, You'll have the confidence to engage 0-300. I understand it's a huge organization and it would change the budget and training sched, but at the end of the day I think every serviceman deserves adequate training.



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 01:15 AM
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reply to post by EyesWideShut
 


Some of us will never carry an M16 again. My job assigns me an M9 pistol and an M240-H machine gun. I've qualified expert with both. Those are the only two weapons used in my MOS. Unless you're in 160th then you get a minigun.



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 03:02 AM
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Originally posted by projectvxn
reply to post by EyesWideShut
 


Some of us will never carry an M16 again. My job assigns me an M9 pistol and an M240-H machine gun.


Same deal with me, I was assigned the M9 as a T/O weapon because I was on a gun team (M240-G) It's great when you're in an admin role or it's (weapons maintenance time) , It sucks when you're humping or in the field because you're either carrying around the gun (Which gets old quick) or the Tripod and T&E. Also if you're out training with the BFA on it turns the 240 into a single shot...lol



posted on Nov, 17 2012 @ 06:48 AM
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reply to post by EyesWideShut
 


The old course of fire used up until very recently by the USMC was stupidly unrealistic. So much is made of the ability to fire to 500m on this course. However if you actually looked at the 500m shoot the firer had 10 minutes to fire 10 rounds, didn't have to wear body armour, helmet or any fighting equipment (such as webbing) and was able to use the sling as a shooting aid! Even in the "rapid" courses of fire at 200m the shooter had 70 seconds to fire 2 strings of 5 shots, though at least there was a change in firing position from standing to kneeling. The rest of the shoot was done from a nice stable prone position. While this is all nice and cosy, it does not in the slightest represent the type of shooting a soldier/marine should be training for.

The British infantryman is expected to pass a weapon test which involves multiple rapid shoots at ranges of between 50 and 400m. All shoots are carried out wearing body armour, helmet, ballistic glasses, gloves and fighting order webbing. All targets are man/half-man and most practices in the test involve transitioning from standing to either kneeling/squatting/prone. Some involve starting from several metres back from the firing point - the shooter is expected to sprint to the firing line and engage the target as soon as it is exposed, usually having to fire 5 rounds in less than 10 - 15 seconds. The longer range targets are exposures of 8-15 seconds, and the shooter is expected to fire up to 3 rounds per exposure. Some practices involve snap shooting at targets that are exposed for random timings.

This is the most basic shooting test that all UK combat infantrymen are expected to pass annually. It is far more representative of the type of combat shooting that a soldier will be expected to carry out on the two way range.

I don't want to start a pissing contest, but all fighting forces need to train how they fight. I hear the USMC is introducing a new course of fire (or may have done so already) that incorporates more realistic shoots. Lets hope it has a few more realistic shoots.



posted on Nov, 21 2012 @ 12:51 AM
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reply to post by PaddyInf
 


You don't learn tactics or gunfighting in bootcamp, you learn that in Marine Combat Training Battalion (POGS) 1 Month long or Infantry Training Battalion (Grunts) 2 months long , in the School of Infantry after bootcamp. The purpose of your time on the range in bootcamp is to learn the fundamentals of marksmanship.

MCT/SOI

Think of it like Boxing or Martial Arts, you don't immediately start sparring. First you learn the proper form and technique then once you have a mastery or atleast a fundamental understanding of the technique, you learn how to employ it.

edit on 21-11-2012 by EyesWideShut because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 21 2012 @ 07:12 AM
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reply to post by EyesWideShut
 


I played with the tightness of the BFA and the gas regulator until I got it to cycle properly. Got out about 30 rounds before a stoppage, but it worked.





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