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The Sell out of America . Our top export " FUEL"

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posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 08:54 PM
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This just amazes me. They have outsourced our workers, our businesses. Now what fuel we have is being sold overseas. Soon there will be nothing else here. I really believe we are being sold to the highest bidder.
When all is said and done , there will be nothing left!! [SNIPPET]



the world’s biggest gas guzzler, is — wait for it — fuel. Measured in dollars, the nation is on pace this year to ship more gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel than any other single export, according to U.S. Census data going back to 1990. It will also be the first time in more than 60 years that America has been a net exporter of these fuels. Just how big of a shift is this? A decade ago, fuel wasn’t even among the top 25 exports. And for the last five years, America’s top export was aircraft. The trend is significant because for decades the U.S. has relied on huge imports of fuel from Europe in order to meet demand. It only reinforced the image of America as an energy hog. And up until a few years ago, whenever gasoline prices climbed, there were complaints in Congress that U.S. refiners were not growing quickly enough to satisfy domestic demand; that controversy would appear to be over. Still, the U.S. is nowhere close to energy independence. America is still the world’s largest importer of crude oil. From January to October, the country imported 2.7 billion barrels of oil worth roughly $280 billion.

Link to entire article :www.trivalleycentral.com...


edit on 31-12-2011 by amatrine because: (no reason given)






edit on 1/1/2012 by Sauron because: to include external quote Tags




posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 09:04 PM
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When I think of the shape of this country today, I cannot help but recall Ross Perot back in the day revealing what our country is about to become if things went the way of the typical politicians way... and he was 100% correct.

Here we have ONE LAST CHANCE to get in office Ron Paul who is NOT the typical politician. If we continue with the typical politician in office, we are DONE. Last chance America...



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 09:09 PM
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I think Ron Paul would be a good start. The thing is though, we still have the same congress. He can not do all he wants on his own, he has to get congress and senate to agree with him.

I am saddened because I think it is too late for this county. We would need a major overhaul very fast.
People are to busy fighting one another, hating this group or that. All the distractions that were put there in the first place to make this nation fall. Divided we Fall, we are a divided nation on so many levels.

Meanwhile the table cloth is being swiped rite from under us.



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 09:14 PM
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reply to post by HangTheTraitors
 


Exactly...Ross Perot and Pat Buchanan both warned about nafta, outsourcing our factories, and uncontrolled illegal immigration and not enough people listened to them back then.

Now it may be already too late, the condition of the country is far far worse but damn this time really is it, and that needs to be the rallying cry of Ron Paul supporters...LAST CHANCE AMERICA



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 09:24 PM
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This is even more insidious and evil than you can imagine. Our government is selling our oil reserves in order to keep the machinery of itself running, and then claiming that the lowered reserves means that our economy is picking up. Not only are they ripping us off, but they are lying about it.

What does this mean for the future? Imagine oil shortages, rationing, unaffordable high gasoline prices, and long long lines at the gas pump.

What we our exporting is our safety net. We are screwed.



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 09:24 PM
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Why are you surprised? Between us and Canada most refinery action happens on the North American continent. (except the largest operation which is actually in India). For many countries it's actually cheaper to ship the oil to the U.S. for refining as it can cost billions to build a plant to do it. It's why we haven't built any new one's in the the U.S. it's cost prohibitive (it costs between 1000 and 5000 per barrel depending on fuel type). Exploration is fast becoming cost prohibitive as well.

www.reuters.com...
Peak Oil, live with it. It doesn't matter if we hoard the fuel, it will cost just as much and probably cause a freaking war. You can't hoard it either. The stuff breaks down quick and within a year is useless. The likelihood was it was never "our" oil to begin with. It was sent to be refined as per contract. Furthermore since all oil in the U.S. is controlled by private companies it was never "ours"
edit on 31-12-2011 by antonia because: forgot something

edit on 31-12-2011 by antonia because: opps



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 09:30 PM
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reply to post by amatrine
 


I thought I would share this to give a better visual representation of what gas prices have looked like over my life frame of 37 years. I came across a page online where an individual claimed to have plotted his gasoline purchases
Over the last 32 years.

After reading his plots I feel they seem pretty accurate compared to my memory of gas prices dating through the same time frame. So I feel it is good representation on the prices over those time periods at least for the Texas area being I am from Texas.

www.randomuseless.info...




The following plots show how much I paid for each gallon of gas I bought over the past 32 years or so. The data has a somewhat varied pedigree. Most of the purchases from 1979-1982 were in the Rio Vista/Fort Worth, Texas area. From late 1982-1983 was from College Station/Rio Vista about equally. From 1984-1987 was a Rio Vista/College Station/Houston mix and from 1987 on has been mostly Houston with a little Fort Worth thrown in. Just about everything pre-1984 was full service and everything since has been self-serve. Every tank shown was "super" unleaded (92-93 octane).









The second plot is similar to the first but here the prices have been adjusted for inflation based on the CPI at the time of the most recent gasoline purchase. This makes it easier to see the inflation adjusted data. For the same reason the US average price data was removed from this plot.









For anyone interested in the raw data...

Actual price paid:www.randomuseless.info...
Adjusted for inflation:www.randomuseless.info...
US City Average:www.randomuseless.info...
The CPI data: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

There is obviously a lot more to the story. I am almost sure I saw someone else post this news but I lost track of the post so I chose your post to put this up. The graph allows you to read a little deeper into the timelines of price gouging.

Why are our prices still so high and who or what truly decides when to increase inflation to keep prices jacked up? So many things to say on the subject but I’m going to leave it here and hear a few other opinion’s.

Aesop


Aesop
edit on 31-12-2011 by Aesop because: Fixed images

edit on 31-12-2011 by Aesop because: edit



posted on Jan, 1 2012 @ 03:45 AM
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reply to post by Aesop
 


The Europeans. Look at how many of the big oil companies are directly or indirectly controlled by the British or Europeans. The thing is, the Euro is worthless. The Dollar has seen better day's but still has value because the USA is sitting on a ton of natural resources.

The British and European governments need cheap gasoline/diesel. Because they balance their budget by taxing the living heck out of oil products. That is the reason why Europe and the UK has historically had high fuel cost's.

Add in the trouble the UK and the EU has had securing oil these last few years(Oil in the North Sea becoming more scarce and Iran threatening the EU and UK both economically and militarily).

We aren't in the Middle East for Israel. The Israeli's are tough enough and strong enough to take care of themselves. The British and Europeans are not. They have neither the will nor the stomach for war with Iran should Iran decide to come a knocking. Add in the ticking Muslim time bomb in Europe....

Anyways, if you want a deeper understanding into what is going on, look how the British manipulated wheat prices in India in the 1800's. They are pretty much doing the same thing to us, but oil instead of wheat.

--------
Also trace the politicians that are super pro- Israel. Look back into time, say early 1900's and look for the group of politicians that where pro British Union. The link is alarmingly self evident.

Till the nations of Europe are torn asunder, the Republic will never know real or meaningful freedom and prosperity.
edit on 1-1-2012 by korathin because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 1 2012 @ 04:11 AM
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Originally posted by amatrine
I think Ron Paul would be a good start.


Ron Paul wants no regulation on private industry.
How would that get them to stop exporting our oil again?



posted on Jan, 1 2012 @ 10:12 AM
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Originally posted by Algernonsmouse

Originally posted by amatrine
I think Ron Paul would be a good start.


Ron Paul wants no regulation on private industry.
How would that get them to stop exporting our oil again?


He's that magical dust that's just gonna fix everything! Don't you know that? I mean there's a congress to deal with and the courts, but OMG Ron paul!

Ron Paul probably doesn't even think Peak Oil is a problem. This is normal for most americans though. You even have people spouting off about aboitic oil or something silly. People have no real grasp of energy issues yet their lives depend on it. It's sad.
edit on 1-1-2012 by antonia because: opps



posted on Jan, 1 2012 @ 02:27 PM
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reply to post by Algernonsmouse
 


Words in my mouth. I never said Ron Paul would get any one to stop exporting oil.
No regulation on Private industry would be good thing for small and private business.
The think to look at though, is the taxation on business.



posted on Jan, 1 2012 @ 05:00 PM
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Originally posted by amatrine
reply to post by Algernonsmouse
 


Words in my mouth. I never said Ron Paul would get any one to stop exporting oil.
No regulation on Private industry would be good thing for small and private business.
The think to look at though, is the taxation on business.


Firstly you said "fuel" not oil. These are two different things. Which is it?
Secondly, no regulation? How would that help? If the problem is exportation shouldn't you stop it? (of course that's not the problem but hey I'm going with your argument). How would lower taxes stop exportation? If anything TARIFFS (aka protective taxation measures) are what is normally employed to stop importation/exportation)
edit on 1-1-2012 by antonia because: forgot something



posted on Jan, 1 2012 @ 05:31 PM
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I said oil in response to another post...Not here to argue for or against Ron Paul. This goes beyond this.
Was not the point of this thread.



posted on Jan, 1 2012 @ 05:40 PM
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Originally posted by amatrine
I said oil in response to another post...Not here to argue for or against Ron Paul. This goes beyond this.
Was not the point of this thread.


Then what is the solution? You said exportation is the problem-How do you get it to stop? I said nothing about Ron Paul, I mentioned your support of the regulation and lower taxes. How does this solve the problem?
edit on 1-1-2012 by antonia because: forgot something



posted on Jan, 1 2012 @ 11:30 PM
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We're actually exporting refined fuels, not crude. This is the opposite of outsourcing, we're providing refining services and generating money in the US. Crude is imported, refined in the US, and shipped out as refined fuel to other countries. Iran is a country with lots of crude and minimal refinement capabilities. The biggest scare is when the US flys a fighter jet directly over one of their refineries.

The US has one of the largest reserves of oil in the world. The government uses groups such as environmentalists to object to tapping those oil reserves. Meanwhile the US imports oil mostly from countries unfriendly to the US, except Canada is the #1 foreign supplier of oil.

You'd think the long range goal of the US is to use up foreign resources, all the while not tapping domestic reserves until foreign resources are tapped. Much easier to tap domestic resources last, than fighting over resources like the US did in the south pacific against Japan in WWII.
edit on 1-1-2012 by Dbriefed because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 09:19 AM
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Originally posted by Dbriefed
We're actually exporting refined fuels, not crude. This is the opposite of outsourcing, we're providing refining services and generating money in the US. Crude is imported, refined in the US, and shipped out as refined fuel to other countries. Iran is a country with lots of crude and minimal refinement capabilities. The biggest scare is when the US flys a fighter jet directly over one of their refineries.

The US has one of the largest reserves of oil in the world. The government uses groups such as environmentalists to object to tapping those oil reserves. Meanwhile the US imports oil mostly from countries unfriendly to the US, except Canada is the #1 foreign supplier of oil.

edit on 1-1-2012 by Dbriefed because: (no reason given)


Uh no, it's not simply environmentalists. What oil we have is expensive to get to and it's not actually crude in the way you know it. The price of that oil will be high and most oil companies are wary of investing large amounts in it as production falls off so sharply. It loses profitability fast. Oil shale, which makes up the bulk of what we have left, is actually a synthetic oil. It's actually kerogen and has to be cooked to extract anything. The process is dirty and destroys the water table if it comes in contact with it. It's a slow and extremely expensive extraction process. Not to mention areas of the U.S. are facing water shortages and will be facing them for the next century. If it comes between water and oil I know what most sane people will pick. So no, it's not going to save the U.S., might buy some time for the U.S. to get it's act together-Which it won't.



posted on Jan, 3 2012 @ 01:55 AM
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reply to post by antonia
 


The estimate for U.S. oil reserves was 21 Billion barrels plus .7 Billion barrels in the Strategic reserve. The U.S. consumes 6.6 Billion barrels per year.

Additional discoveries (including the hard to tap Shale and Tar sands)

  • Outer Continental Shelf + Additional 66-115 Billion barrels of oil - off-limits due to environmental laws (note: might include Jack field and Tiber oil field) www.boemre.gov...
  • Jack field - Gulf of Mexico (Walker Ridge Block 759) + Discovered 2004, additional 6 Billion barrels www.usatoday.com...
  • Jack 2 Gulf of Mexico (Walker Ridge Block 758) - Discovered 2006, additional 3-15 Billion barrels
  • Tiber oil field + Discovered in 2009, additional 4-6 Billion barrels of oil in Gulf of Mexico (site of Deepwater Horizon blowout) en.wikipedia.org...
  • Oxy oil Kern county, CA + Discovered in 2009, additional .250-1 Billion barrels of oil articles.latimes.com...
  • Alaska Anwar Wildlife refuge + Additional 1.9 - 4.3 Billion barrels - off-limits due to environmental laws 205.254.135.7...
  • Eagle Ford field, TX + Undefined, but tapped in 2010 via fracking is producing up to 420K barrels/day. www.nytimes.com...
  • Eastern Utah Tar Sands + Additional 12-19 Billion barrels - off-limits due to environmental laws ostseis.anl.gov...
  • Alabama Tar Sands + Additional 7.5 Billion barrels - off-limits due to environmental laws www.gsa.state.al.us...
  • Kentucky Tar Sands + Additional 3 Billion barrels - off-limits due to environmental laws www.uky.edu...
  • North Dakota Bakken Shale deposit + Discovered 2008, additional 4.3 Billion barrels oil, total 43-200 Billion barrels including shale www.usgs.gov...

    There's a list of reserves in this site (US Energy Information): 205.254.135.7...



  • posted on Jan, 3 2012 @ 07:18 AM
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    Originally posted by Dbriefed
    reply to post by antonia
     


    The estimate for U.S. oil reserves was 21 Billion barrels plus .7 Billion barrels in the Strategic reserve. The U.S. consumes 6.6 Billion barrels per year.

    Additional discoveries (including the hard to tap Shale and Tar sands)

  • Outer Continental Shelf + Additional 66-115 Billion barrels of oil - off-limits due to environmental laws (note: might include Jack field and Tiber oil field) www.boemre.gov...
  • Jack field - Gulf of Mexico (Walker Ridge Block 759) + Discovered 2004, additional 6 Billion barrels www.usatoday.com...
  • Jack 2 Gulf of Mexico (Walker Ridge Block 758) - Discovered 2006, additional 3-15 Billion barrels
  • Tiber oil field + Discovered in 2009, additional 4-6 Billion barrels of oil in Gulf of Mexico (site of Deepwater Horizon blowout) en.wikipedia.org...
  • Oxy oil Kern county, CA + Discovered in 2009, additional .250-1 Billion barrels of oil articles.latimes.com...
  • Alaska Anwar Wildlife refuge + Additional 1.9 - 4.3 Billion barrels - off-limits due to environmental laws 205.254.135.7...
  • Eagle Ford field, TX + Undefined, but tapped in 2010 via fracking is producing up to 420K barrels/day. www.nytimes.com...
  • Eastern Utah Tar Sands + Additional 12-19 Billion barrels - off-limits due to environmental laws ostseis.anl.gov...
  • Alabama Tar Sands + Additional 7.5 Billion barrels - off-limits due to environmental laws www.gsa.state.al.us...
  • Kentucky Tar Sands + Additional 3 Billion barrels - off-limits due to environmental laws www.uky.edu...
  • North Dakota Bakken Shale deposit + Discovered 2008, additional 4.3 Billion barrels oil, total 43-200 Billion barrels including shale www.usgs.gov...

    There's a list of reserves in this site (US Energy Information): 205.254.135.7...


  • Again, it is not simply the amount of oil one has. I can tell you didn't read anything I said. Firstly, at 6.6 billion barrels per year, if the U.S. was the only consumer, that oil would last a little over 3 years. However, the U.S. would not be the only country in demand for oil. China and India are the main drivers of the increase in demand and that's not going to stop anytime soon. Furthermore, you mentioned the Gulf and the Outer Shelf, most of this oil is 5 miles or more below the sea floor. It's expensive and dangerous to get to. It will be priced high to make up for that. Oil Shale and Tar Sands are not oil, they are Kerogen and must be cooked in order to extract anything. that is also a slow expensive process, that will also be priced high.

    Another problem which you will encounter is the cost of such operations is high and they lose profitability fast as that oil is going to be expensive and will reach a point where most people can't afford to buy it. Who is going to extract it then? As for Tar Sands and Oil Shale, they require large amounts of freshwater to process. That water is destroyed in the process, many states are already face shortages of water and clamoring to states surrounding the great lakes for theirs. You really think they are going to give up their water when the other states exhaust theirs after using it to make tar sands oil? (and yes they really can use it up, our us of water is rapidly outpacing the ability of natural systems to replenish it) Desalinization can be used by some states, but it's expensive and that will drive up the price of that oil even more.

    The last issue I'm going to raise here is what you posted is not even accurate, it's estimated reserves. Anyone who has drilled oil will tell you that you will get back a significantly lower amount than what you estimate because it's just not possible to get it all with current technology.

    I'm sure I'll get the whole "Drill baby, Drill" response though. Most people can't understand any of this anyway. In closing Peak Oil is here, all world leaders (well except maybe the Europeans) are too stupid to deal with it. High prices and shortages are the future, get used to it.
    edit on 3-1-2012 by antonia because: forgot something



    posted on Jan, 3 2012 @ 07:59 AM
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    reply to post by antonia
     


    I agree with what you have said. I was wondering if you could also express the impact OPEC has on this issue, as you word things much better than I ever could. I know oil prices are set by OPEC and there is nothing we can do about that aspect of the price outcome. Care to share any info? Thanks.



    posted on Jan, 3 2012 @ 08:04 AM
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    Originally posted by Wetpaint72
    reply to post by antonia
     


    I agree with what you have said. I was wondering if you could also express the impact OPEC has on this issue, as you word things much better than I ever could. I know oil prices are set by OPEC and there is nothing we can do about that aspect of the price outcome. Care to share any info? Thanks.


    OPEC doesn't set prices, it sets production quotas in an effort to set prices. It doesn't really work as most OPEC members nations will not adhere to the quota's anyway. Several of the OPEC nations are in production decline of 5 to 6 percent per year (for at least the last 3 years) so I think any power they have is slowly dwindling.



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