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New Activity at Mt. Rainier Confirmed to Be Seismic (...or ICE?), Right here on ATS!

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posted on Jan, 29 2012 @ 01:02 PM
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It looks like Mt. Rainier is still shaking Mag1.8 4th version

Located near the northern edge of the summit, depth 2.8 km



ah, the revisions are fast and furious. #4 brings the eq down to Mag 1.8, depth 3.3km
edit on 1/29/2012 by Olivine because: add photo


TA, I'm not in total agreement that this is "the usual, low-level background seismicity". The average over the past 40 years is 3 earthquakes per month. This might be classified as an above average month.
edit on 1/29/2012 by Olivine because: smiley




posted on Jan, 29 2012 @ 02:55 PM
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Originally posted by Olivine

TA, I'm not in total agreement that this is "the usual, low-level background seismicity". The average over the past 40 years is 3 earthquakes per month. This might be classified as an above average month.
edit on 1/29/2012 by Olivine because: smiley


Funny, they can get thousands of earthquakes at Yellowstone, over a period of a couple weeks in a massive swarm, and they STILL call it normal.

This might be a bit more than usual, sure, and I saw those figures too. But the real low magnitudes of the quakes are sure not bothering "them". If the quakes start reaching over 3 or 4 mag, and tremor becomes present, that's a bit different.

But this is good that some people are checking on it. Let's just keep watching and see if anything changes over the next weeks.



posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 03:47 PM
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Major Steam from Mount Hood about an hour ago.



posted on Feb, 5 2012 @ 12:09 PM
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edit on 5-2-2012 by megabogie because: wrong thread



posted on Feb, 12 2012 @ 11:22 PM
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Originally posted by TrueAmerican

Originally posted by Olivine

TA, I'm not in total agreement that this is "the usual, low-level background seismicity". The average over the past 40 years is 3 earthquakes per month. This might be classified as an above average month.
edit on 1/29/2012 by Olivine because: smiley


Funny, they can get thousands of earthquakes at Yellowstone, over a period of a couple weeks in a massive swarm, and they STILL call it normal.

This might be a bit more than usual, sure, and I saw those figures too. But the real low magnitudes of the quakes are sure not bothering "them". If the quakes start reaching over 3 or 4 mag, and tremor becomes present, that's a bit different.

But this is good that some people are checking on it. Let's just keep watching and see if anything changes over the next weeks.


They (USGS) know there is a dome rising in Yellowstone, and expect daily, small seismic events over a long term. Your case ,however has the blue lights flashing... this puppy is not supposed to rumble unless something is about to blow, so your alertness and cause for alarm is founded in true geologic science. Good Luck.
edit on 12-2-2012 by charlyv because: spelling , where caught



posted on Feb, 13 2012 @ 09:14 AM
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Speaking of ice quakes, I was recently informed through my sources at USGS that Yellowstone also experiences ice quakes around YS Lake.

Does anyone ever remember hearing anything about that? I can't, and I've been watching that park for years.



posted on Feb, 23 2012 @ 10:38 PM
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TA, Westcoast,
What is up with the "rumble and skid" events on Mt. Rainier? I always forget about the facebook discussions, and just decided to catch up.
WC, I thought your reminder of their previous statement regarding the "unusualness" of this type of signal was great.

Twenty+ minute long skids? Showing on on 3 stations?
I'm skeptical--especially coupled with the past few weeks of quakes in the general PNW area, and now the swarm at Hood.


I'd love to hear everyone's input.

Here is a link to the PNSN group page on facebook (you have to log in) Link



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 11:28 AM
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Just noticed this thread. It's good to see that we're not the only ones watching the Cascades volcanoes. Feel free to send us messages directly if you're curious about strange seismic signals.

John



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 11:39 AM
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In light of the info on this site
Pacific Northwest Seismic Network
I think this thread needs a bump



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 11:52 AM
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In light of the question above about skid events, this post and the ones before and after it on the PNSN Facebook group has details - link.



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 06:38 PM
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Originally posted by JohnVidale
Feel free to send us messages directly if you're curious about strange seismic signals.

John


Well, I would, except for the last time I proposed that to another scientist, and much worse- in the case that I should happen to be monitoring a certain supervolcano and I saw some things, he couldn't even promise that he'd be woken up...let alone be able to deal with a much more urgent situation immediately from his own house. And that's just for the 3.0. If I had called and had already seen tremor at the time of the call, he couldn't even tell me what he'd even do in THAT case.

So I want to see these "mitigation" plans, John.



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 07:46 PM
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My phone number is easily found, until people call me so much I have to change it.

CVO is first in line for activity at the volcanoes, and I can't speak for them, but Washington and Oregon both have emergency management departments with our duty seismologist beeper on speed dial.

So if danger looks impending, give one of us a call.



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 07:56 PM
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reply to post by JohnVidale
 


I would assume you've seen the movie "Dante's Peak", right John?

And I would assume you've seen the heliplot and understand the circumstances around Okmok at the time it went off "without warning."?

Just curious if you have...



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 08:06 PM
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No volcano will erupt with an little warning as we are likely to get from great earthquakes. Our business is to be as prepared as possible. For example, how do you harden a seismic network again an M7 right under Seattle?

The case of the Italians on trial for manslaughter not predicting the L'Aquila earthquake is interesting. One can't try something difficult and escape liability if one screws up. Or in their case, even if one did and said the right thing.



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 08:13 PM
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So, uh, how bleeped am I if that things pops top? Live near Bellevue. Would love a sort of fallout map, and more info on what to expect if she gets angry.



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 08:17 PM
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Actually, I knew nothing about volcanoes until moving to Bellevue in 2006. But I think the ash fall from Rainier would depend strongly on the direction of the wind, and hence be largely unpredictable. The danger would only be high from the lahar coming down the Duwamish, at least that's my uninformed understanding.



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 08:38 PM
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reply to post by JohnVidale
 


So I'll be alive, but covered in ash? As I recall ash from Mt. St. Helens came all the way up here. It's yellowstone that would kill me right? I can't keep all my fears in order. Between alien invasion, insectoids walking among us, those damn zombies and Rush Limbaugh it's hard to know what to fear most.



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 08:42 PM
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reply to post by Domo1
 


Cascades volcanoes have a range of potential size eruptions. Yellowstone does have the potential of very large eruptions, but only goes off every million years or so in a stupendous fashion.

MSH, Rainier, Hood, all could have a bigger or smaller eruption, depending on your luck. MSH 1980 was the biggest eruption there in several thousand years, and sideways directed, to boot, very bad luck for those in the way.



posted on Mar, 15 2013 @ 02:39 PM
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I was just thinking about these repeating ice-quakes from last year--I haven't noticed any this winter.
To be honest, I haven't looked at every day of seismos from Mt. Rainier this winter, either.
Has anybody else seen them?

This is a snow level report from Paradise, WA for the past 15 months. Values aren't exactly the same as last year--but this data is from pretty low down the mountain's flank (around 5400').

I wonder what is different to cause the glaciers to be so quiet? Thoughts?
edit on 3/15/2013 by Olivine because: speeeeling



posted on Mar, 15 2013 @ 02:46 PM
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reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


Right here on ATS ! I friggen love that !


SnF OP
edit on 15-3-2013 by randyvs because: (no reason given)





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