The GRAPHENE mega thread - because it's technology you need to know about!

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posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 07:07 AM
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Wow, interesting. Nice thread, OP.




posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 07:44 AM
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Originally posted by Jon Quinn


reply to post by dowot
 

What is the connection between Graphene and Manchester (UK) University?


Not to get too indepth but Wikipedia has the details.



A key advance in the science of graphene came when Andre Geim and Kostya Novoselov at Manchester University managed to extract single-atom-thick crystallites (graphene) from bulk graphite in 2004.[13] The Manchester researchers pulled out graphene layers from graphite and transferred them onto thin SiO2 on a silicon wafer in a process sometimes called micromechanical cleavage or, simply, the Scotch tape technique. The SiO2 electrically isolated the graphene, and was weakly interacting with the graphene, providing nearly charge-neutral graphene layers. The silicon beneath the SiO2 could be used as a "back gate" electrode to vary the charge density in the graphene layer over a wide range.


Click here for wikipedia article


As for the University, it's always good news when something mindblowing has a breakthrough in a place you walk around everyday I find it inspiring!

The Uni has a great history it was set up in the city ( which was the first industrialised city in the world) as a technical institute in the 19th Century. The atom was first split here by Rutherford and the first computer made.
edit on 31/12/11 by Jon Quinn because: (no reason given)



How many times do you people from Manchester have to be told..........Manchester WAS NOT the first industrial city in the world. That honour goes to BIRMINGHAM :-

en.wikipedia.org...

Can you see where it states......BIRMINGHAM "THE FIRST MANUFACTURING TOWN IN THE WORLD"

Also the Industrial revolution did not begin in Manchester like you Manc's seem to think. The Industrial Revolution began in many places in the UK including Ironbridge Shropshire:-

en.wikipedia.org...

You Manc's have such an insecurity complex






posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 11:19 AM
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Pretty cool stuff, and to think its just carbon. Then again, so are diamonds



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 02:23 PM
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reply to post by XTTIOTX


Ah yes the double helix energy beam of the Great Pyramid





posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 02:28 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


Zorgon no picture



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 03:13 PM
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reply to post by Thermo Klein
 


Im blown away by this, do you think we will start to see Graphene used as armor plating? Do you know what its melting point is? How much is it? When will it be available?

Too many questions to ask!




posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 03:24 PM
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Another NEW article on graphene!

Science Daily: 'Nanowiggles:' Scientists Discover Graphene Nanomaterials With Tunable Functionality in Electronics


Electronics are getting smaller and smaller, flirting with new devices at the atomic scale. However, many scientists predict that the shrinking of our technology is reaching an end. Without an alternative to silicon-based technologies, the miniaturization of our electronics will stop. One promising alternative is graphene -- the thinnest material known to man. Pure graphene is not a semiconductor, but it can be altered to display exceptional electrical behavior. Finding the best graphene-based nanomaterials could usher in a new era of nanoelectronics, optics, and spintronics (an emerging technology that uses the spin of electrons to store and process information in exceptionally small electronics).



Scientists at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have used the capabilities of one of the world's most powerful university-based supercomputers, the Rensselaer Center for Nanotechnology Innovations (CCNI), to uncover the properties of a promising form of graphene, known as graphene nanowiggles. What they found was that graphitic nanoribbons can be segmented into several different surface structures called nanowiggles. Each of these structures produces highly different magnetic and conductive properties. The findings provide a blueprint that scientists can use to literally pick and choose a graphene nanostructure that is tuned and customized for a different task or device. The work provides an important base of knowledge on these highly useful nanomaterials.



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 03:30 PM
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Originally posted by Dionisius
reply to post by Thermo Klein
 


Im blown away by this, do you think we will start to see Graphene used as armor plating? Do you know what its melting point is? How much is it? When will it be available?

Too many questions to ask!



"the melting point of the graphene nanoribbon extracted from the numerical simulation is ~3400 K"
which is OMG!!!!!
HOT!!!

Source: Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Melting and Vacancy Movement in Graphene Nanoribbons

It seems most of what I've seen is focusing on electrical research but I'd be REALLY surprised if defense companies weren't already using it for shields and such.

It's actually very inexpensive!
50g vials of Graphene microfibers can be purchased, by the public, for $99 USD.
it's basically graphite - a very common material, that is changed using moderately expensive techniques so far. A lot of universities are experimenting with much cheaper ways of making it from scratch.



posted on Jan, 5 2012 @ 05:26 AM
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reply to post by Thermo Klein
 


Whenever graphene starts to enter production and products in a big way, and more research develops new technologies from it at an increasing rate, things like foldable computers will be sold at dollar stores and planes will weigh as much as a dragonfly.



posted on Jan, 5 2012 @ 06:55 PM
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Spam removed by admin
edit on Jan 5th 2012 by Djarums because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2012 @ 07:42 PM
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cool, i want to make a bomb proof suit out of this stuff or maybe a bullet proof suit. he,he i could be bat man with a suit of armer. CAIN'T TOUCH THIS.



posted on Jan, 6 2012 @ 02:40 PM
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Here is the Army budget justification forecast, public domain.

asafm.army.mil...

If you go down to RDTE section (Research, Development, Test and Evaluation), you can see they are looking into using it for future nano-technologies and other potential future tech.

Some other good info in there if you have a particular line item you want to search for, or want to just do some digging.
edit on 6-1-2012 by olesmoothie because: added last sentence



posted on Jan, 8 2012 @ 08:34 PM
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To answer some of the Defense Industry, DOE, and NASA inquiries... take a look!
SBIR Small Business Innovation Research



Award List:

Wide Temperature, High Energy Density Capacitors for Power System
Award Year / Program / Phase:2009 / SBIR / Phase I
Agency / Branch: DOD / OSD
Principal Investigator:King Wang – (781) 935-1200
Award Amount:$99,993.00
..
Abstract:
Nanotrons, in collaboration with the Nanodielectric Group headed by Prof. Lei Zhu at the Case Western Reserve University (Case Western), proposes a novel nano-engineering approach to develop a new category of nano-dielectrics for high energy density capacitor applications. The new approach combines… More


Low Cost High-rate Manufacturing of Flexible Explosive Detection Sensor
Award Year / Program / Phase:2010 / STTR / Phase I
Agency / Branch: DOD / NAVY
Research Institution:N/A
Principal Investigator:Je Lee, Senior Material Scientist – (781) 935-1200
Award Amount:$69,933.00
RI Contact:N/A
..
Abstract:
Nanotrons Corporation, in collaboration with Professor Byungki Kim at NSF Nanomanufacturing Research Center at the University of Massachusetts Lowell (UML), proposes to develop the low-cost high-rate manufacturing technique for flexible explosive detection sensors to significantly increase… More


Functionalized Graphene Sheets-Polymer Based Nanocomposite for Cryotanks
Award Year / Program / Phase:2010 / SBIR / Phase I
Agency:NASA
Principal Investigator:Je Kyun Lee, Principal Investigator – (781) 935-1200
Award Amount:$99,944.00
..
Abstract:
NASA seeks advanced high strength and toughness composite materials with the highest microcrack resistance at cryogenic temperatures suitable for use in fuel containment of liquid oxygen, hydrogen, and methane. Nanotrons Corporation, in collaboration with Prof. Bungki Kim at NSF nanomanufacturing… More


High Energy Density Nanodielectrics for Commercial Pulse Power Applications
Award Year / Program / Phase:2010 / SBIR / Phase I
Agency: NSF
Principal Investigator:Je Kyun Lee, PhD – (781) 935-1200
Award Amount:$149,949.00
..
Abstract:
This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will develop a new category of high energy density nanocomposite dielectric materials for use in high pulse power capacitors. The approach is to bring together 3 nanostructures in a polypropylene matrix to form a novel nanocomposite material… More


Recovery Act - Carbon Nanotube
Award Year / Program / Phase:2010 / SBIR / Phase I
Agency: DOE
Principal Investigator:Kuiyang Jiang, Dr. – (781) 935-1200
Award Amount:$149,952.00
..
Abstract:
The need for pure water is a global problem that encompasses manufacturing, home consumption and desalination. Currently reverse osmosis filtration is used for purification but its widespread use is hampered by the high energy cost required to operate the systems. We have demonstrated that… More


Recovery Act - Nano-Enabled TiO2 UV Protective Layer for Cool-Color Roofing Application
Award Year / Program / Phase:2010 / SBIR / Phase II
Agency: DOE
Principal Investigator:King Wang, Dr. – (781) 935-1200
Award Amount:$999,944.00
..
Abstract:
Durable and aesthetically acceptable cool roof materials are critically necessary for the success of energy saving program. Currently used organic pigments in cool roof paints are too sensitive to UV light to endure long time
exposure to strong sunlight. Elongation of the lifetime of organic… More


Recovery Act - Carbon Nanotube Based Water Purification
Award Year / Program / Phase:2010 / SBIR / Phase II
Agency: DOE
Principal Investigator:Kuiyang Jiang, Dr. – (781) 935-1200
Award Amount:$999,962.00
..
Abstract:
The need for pure water is a global challenge that encompasses manufacturing, home consumption and desalination. Current filtration technologies that are used to purify water are too energy intensive.Nanotrons proposes an innovative carbon nanotube based water filtration membrane technology that… More


Recovery Act - Self Assembled TiO2 UV Protection Layer for Cool Roof Pigment Application
Award Year / Program / Phase:2010 / SBIR / Phase I
Agency: DOE
Principal Investigator:King Wang, Dr. – (781) 935-1200
Award Amount:$149,836.00
..
Abstract:
Durable and aesthetically acceptable cool roof materials are critically necessary for the success of energy saving program. Currently used organic pigments in cool roof paints are too sensitive to UV light to endure long time exposure to strong sunlight. Elongation of the lifetime of organic… More


I have to be honest.... it's really refreshing to see our U.S. tax dollars going into something that will actually help our future and inspire more jobs!


edit on 8-1-2012 by Thermo Klein because: changed
to : D



posted on Jan, 8 2012 @ 11:34 PM
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Here's some proof people actually WERE working on this in those years between 1985 (Bucky Balls created) and 2004; in fact it goes back a decade before that to 1970!

Bucky Central U of Texas


Graphene has been made by four different methods. The first was chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and epitaxial growth, such as the decomposition of ethylene on nickel surfaces13. These early efforts (which started in 1970) were followed by a large body of work by the surface-science community on ‘monolayer graphite’14. The second was the micromechanical exfoliation of graphite15. This approach, which is also known as the ‘Scotch tape’ or peel-off method, followed on from earlier work on micromechanical exfoliation from patterned graphite16. The third method was epitaxial growth on electrically insulating surfaces such as SiC (ref. 17) and the fourth was the creation of colloidal suspensions.


Chemical info:

The remarkable properties of graphene reported so far include high values of its Young’s modulus (~1,100 GPa)2, fracture strength (125 GPa)2, thermal conductivity (~5,000 W m−1K−1)3, mobility of charge carriers (200,000 cm2 V−1 s−1)4 and specific surface area (calculated value, 2,630 m2 g−1)5, plus fascinating transport phenomena such as the quantum Hall effect6. Graphene and chemically modified graphene (CMG) are promising candidates as components in applications such as energy-storage materials5, ‘paper-like’ materials7,8, polymer composites9,10, liquid crystal devices11 and mechanical resonators12.



edit on 8-1-2012 by Thermo Klein because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 05:28 AM
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reply to post by Thermo Klein
 


So TK if you would speculate with me. What do you think would be achieved if one were to suspend graphene say a 10nm powder in a more mundane polymer like urethane? I'm thinking structural stability here. You probably would not get the "elephant on a pencil" strength, but wouldn't it enhance the dimentional stability of a cast piece considerably. Wouldn't that be crazy easy, and not so expensive too? Oversimplistic? Am I missing something? Would the urethane just end up being the weak link and structural failure occur around the suspended graphene? I know it would, but at a higher energy than before. Hmm... I may have to get some of this stuff, and play around with it.

I'm an avid immature..er I mean amateur inventor. I do a lot of casting with RTV, and low heat catalyzing polymers. Any ideas? I'm thinking along the lines of a trauma plate or something.



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 06:17 PM
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reply to post by Binder
 


I don't really have enough nano-science background to know for sure. I've been looking quite a bit into this and actually thinking about getting some peeps together to start a company! There seems to be a HUGE niche still unfilled using this stuff! (If you're in Northern California pm me!)

I've heard graphene can stretch 20% in width and length, but also heard it's one of the stiffest materials we know. It can be utterly flexible, but also incerdibly strong.... not sure how all those tie together. The only thing I've heard about mixing graphene with another substance is adding 1% graphene to plastics which can make the entire mixture a conductor! I haven't anything yet about macro-size objects made from it - mostly "large" is about one square cm, with a 4" x 4" square visible in one video.

So, at this point I can only speculate and keep reading patent applications



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 09:59 PM
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reply to post by Thermo Klein
 


I'm in North Texas, but I might have some interest.
I have taken graphite, and used an appropriate shore scale hardness of urethane to cast pillow block bushings that are very low friction, durable, and yet remain slightly flexible. It's not anything new, or amazingly high tech, but it is a little known technique to work around the limitations of normal bushings that prematurely wear out in certain applications, and it is cheaper to manufacture than a standard bushing in most cases. The trick would be figuring out how the lattice in the graphene wants to line up, and how to manipulate it so that it lines up the way you want it. I think I'm definately going to play with this stuff. Not as much interest in the electromagnetic properties as in the structural properties it could lend to other polymers.

Imagine a polymer fender on a car that would safely absorb an impact, yet return to original shape with minimal deformation, or a ballistic resistant jacket shell, PPE gear that doesn't wear out etc.... I can see where the applictions are almost limitless. It would be a matter of figuring out how to get the lattice to orient the way you want.



posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 06:48 PM
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Originally posted by IwasOnceHappy

Originally posted by Thermo Klein
This company is working with research students at a small university creating graphene from Carbon Dioxide!

If this stuff is so easy to make WHY did it take from 1985 (Buckminsterfullerene) until after 2000 to make it??


I found this very interesting. Let's say that vehicle companies can get on board with this and produce cars that can run with this technology. We can't all afford to run out and buy new vehicles, many are strapped and are just living. What if **big if, but just thinking out loud** a small start up company, made *filters* or *modified mufflers* for vehicles that would turn the carbon dioxide into graphene (or something near to it that can be finished off). People could have it attached to their vehicles and then stop for servicing (or by themselves) and have it emptied or replaced. They get a monetary stipend as the resulting graphene would be sent to companies to use to make other items. Futuristic, I know, but just a thought.

This is probably way more over my head, but I saw this and thought about it and thought *in MY mind* it seems to make sense and help stop the carbon dioxide going into the air. Could be stupid, but hey, I have been known for making stupid mistakes over my lifetime.

IWOH


This is an extraordinarily good idea!
I would get a patent on that before anyone else gets in there!
Star for you, and I see no reason (apart from startup costs) why this might not be the way forward to reduce pollution from vehicles, if the exhaust gases can be used for some benefit.
We need to get a few people together to develop this idea, it could revolutionise transport and increase the production of graphene to boot.



posted on Jan, 11 2012 @ 04:48 AM
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i heard about this stuff apparently we might see bendable smartphones soon. where can i invest in this stuff?



posted on Jan, 11 2012 @ 07:05 PM
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Originally posted by coreytheconspirator
i heard about this stuff apparently we might see bendable smartphones soon. where can i invest in this stuff?


Currently Samsung has the highest number of patents concerning graphene. One of most advanced companies working with graphene is Nanotrons Corporation, a subsidiary of Agiltron Inc, but both are privately held:

"Agiltron is a revenue growth company, presently having over 100 employees, proudly manufacturing industrial leading products in the US. Agiltron is organized into four business subsidiaries: Agiltron-Fiberoptics, RamanSystems, SensorArrays, and Nanotrons."

I haven't found a good place to invest in this yet but have been preparing a white paper of sorts... I may share it here, we'll see.


edit on 11-1-2012 by Thermo Klein because: (no reason given)






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