The GRAPHENE mega thread - because it's technology you need to know about!

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posted on Jan, 1 2012 @ 10:21 PM
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reply to post by Dionisius
 


I read this story before,

In 1859 Werner von Siemens (who founded the German electrical company) was laying telegraph cable by the Red Sea, and visited Giza and climbed the Great Pyramid. When he reached the top, he stabbed his hand in the air in triumph. When he got a mild electrical shock, he decided to investigate further.

A Leyden jar is a device for storing static electricity. Siemens improvised a Leyden jar by wrapping wet paper around a wine bottle that had a metal neck, and carried it to the top of the Great Pyramid and held it over his head. The bottle became electrically charged and generated sparks when touched.

Sixty-one years later, in 1920, Antoine Bovis, a French ironmonger, visited the Great Pyramid and saw the mummified remains of small animals in the King’s Chamber. When he examined the bodies, he discovered they had no odor and, in spite of the humidity in the King’s Chamber, the bodies were dehydrated.

Bovis returned to France and built a wooden model of the Great Pyramid. He aligned it north-south and put a recently deceased cat inside. Within a few days, the cat had mummified. He experimented with other animals, meat and eggs, and reported that all had dehydrated and mummified rather than decaying.

I think it would be interesting to do the graphene experiment you speak of, but they don't really allow to much research on the pyramids anymore. Maybe the revolution going on in Egypt can change that.




posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 12:05 AM
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Graphene condoms. Ultra thin for the gentlemans increased pleasure and
guaranteed never to break.


Graphene condoms sharpen your pencil.



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 12:30 AM
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I could see the military finding use for this. graphene tanks. graphene armour. i said too much didnt i?



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 03:40 AM
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reply to post by XTTIOTX
 


Bovis said himself that he never went to Egypt and subsequent, actual scientific testing of this supposed Pyramid power has shown there is no evidence of any kind of effect.

Lets not get carried away with pseudoscience in a thread about very real, actual science.



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 05:35 AM
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reply to post by Thermo Klein
 


holy !@#$# the future is here after all. But will Big business (Oil, Steel, Etc) let it happen. Heck would we even know... it being "invisible" and all. yea i said it


Peace and love



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 10:03 AM
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reply to post by stumason
 


My fault. I read this story in a few different places. I was under the impression that these stories were true after seeing them in multiple places. Thank you for making me aware of the truth.



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 11:17 AM
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Originally posted by Thermo Klein
reply to post by OwenGP185
 


the strength is along the lattice formation mainly so adding more layers won't make it multiples stronger. I don't know the math-specifics of it but I've seen quite a few articles discussing that the width of cling wrap is plenty strong. Also, even tiny pieces of it mixed into a other substances make that substance stronger.





You're right, but...multiple layers would make it withstand more. If a bullet is fired through one layer, then it will have slowed that much before hitting the next. I don't know if that's a good analogy, and I'm no scientist, but just thinking of the workings of F=M*A and friction.



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 12:23 PM
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reply to post by Thermo Klein
 

Hmmm...it's existence was first postulated in 1947?
Interesting. Can anyone say Roswell??? : )

A flag and a star for you, OP. Great topic.
-TAT



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 02:45 PM
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I really wish theyd start making trash bags with this stuff. It'd be nice to pull that HUGELY overstuffed bag out of the can and not worry about it busting open while walking between the door and the dumpster.



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 02:51 PM
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Im wondering if you could wrap it around a carbonfiber strand core and make up some super light zero voltage drop high voltage transmission lines for our power grid? Or make up some zero loss step up/down transformers?

I like the idea of using Graphene in between sheets of glass to use as a safety glass interlayer in place of PVB. Or maybe in use in Kevlar vest to reduce bulk.

Stuff seems really cool



Bill



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 07:17 PM
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reply to post by Thermo Klein
 


Super great, I can't wait for this technology to blossom. I've always said that humans are at the cusps of a new technology explosion.



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 09:25 PM
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The USA needs to point some of that $2tn defense budget at this product and get some mainstream developments going like Tanks, Bullets, Planes, Ships et al. Then we can all enjoy Graphene clothing, cars, bikes, iPhones, iPads et al.

This is a real game changer, a replacement for plastic and steel. If only I had the patent for it and could charge 1 cent everytime it was used.



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 10:13 PM
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Originally posted by pshea38
Graphene condoms. Ultra thin for the gentlemans increased pleasure and
guaranteed never to break.


Graphene condoms sharpen your pencil.


Edited: (just in case)

edit on 2-1-2012 by Thermo Klein because: Removed line: It's stiffer than most materials and can expand 20% of it's width...




posted on Jan, 3 2012 @ 08:45 AM
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Its all very cool and exciting BUT don't get too excited. These kind of materials will never really see their full potential reached in our everyday lives due to planned obsolescence. For example, imagine if a Tyre manufacturer made a new kind of tyre coated in this stuff and as a result (this is hypothetical) your tyres lasted for 30 years instead of a year or two. The tyre companies would soon go out of business because you wouldn't need to buy any for so long.

Industry needs to make stuff that will break and wear down quickly in order to keep your money coming in. That's why I'm no fan of the late Steve Jobs, he was a master of planned obsolescence, he could sell you a perfectly good phone and then make you feel 'behind' or 'lacking' if you didn't buy the next model 6 months later just because it now came with a slightly better camera or a new calculator or whatever.

YouTube 'planned obsolescence' if you haven't come across it before. It's shocking. Apologies for covering old ground if you already knew about it



posted on Jan, 3 2012 @ 09:05 AM
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reply to post by Duderood
 


While I agree with you, I do believe that in some cases, 'planned obsolesence' can be achieved in more creative ways, even in products which don't break down (at least, as soon as the makers would like.) They do this through further improvements, style changes, etc.

Just continuing with the tire example, a "new and improved / gotta-have-it" tread pattern with better snow grip...

Or a different size, new cars, style changes (lower profile, higher profile, etc.)

Sure, some things will be suppressed, but others - they can work with and still make the $$.



posted on Jan, 3 2012 @ 11:04 AM
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Thats sweet!

Where can I find some of this stuff?

This material will change everything once they start making body armor, windows etc with it.



posted on Jan, 3 2012 @ 12:50 PM
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Originally posted by Thermo Klein
This company is working with research students at a small university creating graphene from Carbon Dioxide!

If this stuff is so easy to make WHY did it take from 1985 (Buckminsterfullerene) until after 2000 to make it??


I found this very interesting. Let's say that vehicle companies can get on board with this and produce cars that can run with this technology. We can't all afford to run out and buy new vehicles, many are strapped and are just living. What if **big if, but just thinking out loud** a small start up company, made *filters* or *modified mufflers* for vehicles that would turn the carbon dioxide into graphene (or something near to it that can be finished off). People could have it attached to their vehicles and then stop for servicing (or by themselves) and have it emptied or replaced. They get a monetary stipend as the resulting graphene would be sent to companies to use to make other items. Futuristic, I know, but just a thought.

This is probably way more over my head, but I saw this and thought about it and thought *in MY mind* it seems to make sense and help stop the carbon dioxide going into the air. Could be stupid, but hey, I have been known for making stupid mistakes over my lifetime.

IWOH



posted on Jan, 3 2012 @ 11:15 PM
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reply to post by Thermo Klein
 


I think we can officially say that Moore's Law is about to be broken...



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 12:33 AM
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Here is a pretty cool article on graphene, even shows you how they make it... not as difficult as I thought!
physicsworld.com...



posted on Jan, 4 2012 @ 07:00 AM
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reply to post by dogstar23
 


Totally agree with you. There's surely some decent and good applications but I worry about the darker, more, materialistic aspect of planned ob'. Y'know the old bread and circus philosophy. I wonder if what you're talking about is more straight forward obsolescence rather than a conscious plan to build poor design and lesser quality stuff.

Still, I'll be optimistic and hopefully Graphene will become available and save us all some money and energy.




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