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TEOTWAWKI Clothing: What Are the Best, Most Comfortable, and Most Durable Hiking Shoes and Socks?

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posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 01:52 PM
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There is all sorts of information out there on TSHTF food, shelter, etc. but probably one of the most important articles of clothing seems to get little attention. Whether hiking long distances, in a survival situation, or riding out a lengthy period of economic or political turmoil, your feet are probably your most precious commodity when it comes to transportation. That means you need shoes and socks that not only are never going to quit and which are going to be capable of surviving a beating in all sorts of weather, but they are also as comfortable as is possible.

I hear a lot about military boots, but isn't there something out there which is more like a hiker?

In your opinion, what are the most comfortable and durable hikers and socks? I think comfortable is self explanatory, but when I say durable...let's put it this way...

If you had to place an actual bet that your shoes were going to last and protect your feet the entire length of the American Discovery Trail (6,800 miles / 11,000 kilometers), and that your feet were going to be comfortable, what would you put your money on? What shoes and socks? I expect to hear lots of recommendations for military boots, but in your opinion is there anything else?




posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 02:03 PM
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When I hiked the Appalachian trail, I wore a pair of military issue jungle boots. I also wore military issue wool socks. They worked just fine for me.



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 02:30 PM
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Wear some silk liners .

www.mec.ca...

www.mec.ca...



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 02:43 PM
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Just wanted to bump into here as I was a bit curious myself. I wear wool socks but need something less itchy lol



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 02:47 PM
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Originally posted by abeverage
Just wanted to bump into here as I was a bit curious myself. I wear wool socks but need something less itchy lol
If the wool is too itchy for you, wear sweat socks underneath. I hope you don't live in the south though. Your feet would seriously sweat. Just remember to remove shoes and socks every night to allow your feet to breathe and avoid trench foot.



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 06:02 PM
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I don't have any brand in particular, but Danner, Magnum, and Matterhorn/Corcoran all make some great stuff. I basically look for a certain feature set, waterproof, composite toe, etc.



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 06:55 PM
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Recently I have been using a sock liner made by wigwam. They are only about $6 a pair and work really well.

Years ago when I was a younger lad I learned that panty hose works well under your socks. Learned this on many ruck marches. Buy a pair of the support hose that only go to the knee. It allows the sock to slide against them and not the skin...keeps you from getting blisters. They also help with circulation.

Also, I suggest you stay away from cotton. Cotton is not your friend. deal with the wool socks if you can find them.

I like the jungle boots for all around hiking but dont wear them in the winter! I lost my gear in a vehicle accident in the 80's and was wearing jungle boots while we convoyed...a trailer with my gear on it tumbled down the mountain and I was stuck for 4 miserable weeks in the mountains in Korea wearing them...I wanted to cry.

I found a all around boot that I love made by a company called Georgia Giant. They are waterproof and I wear them daily for the past 5 years and they are still in great shape and comfortable right out of the box.

Just my opinion



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 08:34 PM
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reply to post by HillbillyHippie1
 


Quite simply, wear Merino Wool socks, with liners if you have sensitive feet. Merino wool is one of the best natural insulators and suprisingly comfortable depending on thickness. You can also pick up 100% waterproof Merino socks for about $30-$35. The best waterproofs are Sealskins in my experience.

Then onto Primary footwear, there is only one real winner when it comes to durabilty, strength, comfort and value all wrapped together - The British Royal Marine Serviceman Boot. You will be able to find them at any military surplus or fairly easily online. If you dont want anything military then Merrels are your best bet, get boots with high ankle for support when walking on rough terrain, merrels also have some of the best waterproofing and are insanely warm and comfortable.

Happy Walking

edit on 30-12-2011 by Dionisius because: because i can



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 09:00 PM
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The questions you need to be asking are not what OTHER people recommend - ask what is best for you. Consider weight you will be carrying, distance on your feet, region, terrain, etc. The ONLY way you will know what works for you is to use your gear under real conditions.


If you had to place an actual bet that your shoes were going to last and protect your feet the entire length of the American Discovery Trail (6,800 miles / 11,000 kilometers), and that your feet were going to be comfortable, what would you put your money on? What shoes and socks?


The answer to that depends heavily on your region, but the basics are simple: sock liners, wool socks and a good pair of boots, the fewer the seams, the better. I prefer full grain leather not synthetic material, no steel shank in the colder regions and good arch-supports that fit, (Examples: La Sportiva or Vasque boots with Superfeet, Smartwool socks in different weights, silk liners).

Rule of thumb: every 1 pound on your foot (your boot weight) feels like 5 pounds in your pack, so go for the lightest weight boot, that meets the majority of your needs.

P.s. If we have to tell you NO cotton, you're already in trouble... but I'm guessing a hillbilly hippie probably knows that.

edit on 30-12-2011 by LadySkadi because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 09:18 PM
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reply to post by HillbillyHippie1
 


Converse makes some great light weight boots and merel makes great shoes also...I use these almost all the time from summer to winter wear.
I have several socks, wool for winter and under armour for hiking...moisture wicking.
Have foot powder or baby powder and air out your feet daily, that will do wonders for them, when your hiking a lot....also, have athletic tape and mole skin, just incase...as long as your not in a lot of show, these shoes and socks are good to go.
Lots of snow in your area, I have cabelas pack boots and I have military issued boots....several pair because it might take 2-3 days for your boots to dry out safely without causing them to wear out early...they should air dry, away from heat, slowly.



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 10:02 PM
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I think just as important as the boot, is the care you take of it. A pair of 50$ steel toes from sears is going to kill your feet and back of course ( I know from a particularly cash short time), but any good pair of all grain leather should work allowing for personnal preferance. I've worn all the standard army boot in the service. Jungles were often prefered because of less leather surface area to shine. They are excellent boots for warm weather.

I've been wearing steel toes ever since the military for work. I like gel insoles in every boot I've ever had, tried the Dr. Sholes air pillow inserts. They feel good, but wear out too quickly, gel lasts at least 5X as long for me.

The most important factor for me with boots is the application of shoe shine wax, or mink oil if prefered. A pair of boots with a decent application of wax will withstand water so much better than even the fanciest waterproof types. They will all eventually get wet, so a second pair to rotate can really help.

The best socks for durability and comfort I've worn are the black Army type. A blend of 50% wool, 30% cotton, and 20% nylon. And plenty of extra to keep feet dry.



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 10:09 PM
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Red wings or Danner are pretty good, and a thick cotton/wool, with a gortex or silk liner wouldn't hurt either, light weight and durable is the key, they're now making skins out of Kevlar and that would probably last you a lifetime of wear and tear



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 10:20 PM
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Excuse me, but I wasn't sure what 'TEOTWAWKI' was so had to reference it... but here's my 2c

The Apache could out run mounted horseman in very difficult country, whether on a pony or by foot, in terrain that was far worse than any Appalachian east coast trail, and I know they didn't wear socks or synthetic composites. Since they were removed from their homeland & refused re-entry, and so few are left, I'm not sure what they used as footwear and couldn't find any serious reference to it accept on one Ray Mears survival video ... but you might like to consider going native.

edit on 30-12-2011 by chocise because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 07:01 AM
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reply to post by kaferwerks
 
Agree, no Jungle boots in winter. I live in Florida though, so they are perfect year round below the frost line.



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 01:31 PM
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reply to post by HillbillyHippie1
 


Wool socks and well worn-in boots. Army boots work great for this.
Civilian boots tend to last a little shorter, usually.
If you can find a cobbler for replacing the soles then maybe some of the old-school boots would work?



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 01:46 PM
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Originally posted by watchdog8110
Wear some silk liners .

www.mec.ca...

www.mec.ca...


Can't find any silk liners on that link you posted dude.



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 02:02 PM
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I use box tape (3M brown) on the inside of the shoe heal to protect the fabric and reduce friction. Works quite well and is inexpensive and easily removed and replaced when it gets worn. Doesn't leave a sticky goo either like duck/duct tape would.
edit on 31-12-2011 by shushu because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 14 2012 @ 04:23 PM
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reply to post by HillbillyHippie1
 


Follow the front line operators on this one. Asolo boots and Smartwool socks (or Darn tough). I put a new set of all leather Asolos on and did ten miles on the first day through the mountains. No breaking in, no blisters and no bruising. They are two years old now and I wear them every day, Other than the scuffs and some worn tread they are as good as new.
Just my experience



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