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Rare Archeological find in Jerusalem

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posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 11:40 AM
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Rare object was used to purchase ritually pure offerings

Its owner was probably on their way to the Temple to make a sacrifice sometime in the first century B.C. when they dropped the button-sized token that would show the priest that they had bought a ritually pure sheep or libation for their offering. It was finally found about two weeks ago.

That’s more than 2,000 years too late for its owner, but for archeologists it constitutes a rare find from the era that sheds light on the daily administrative activity of the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem. That was a time when the Temple employed reams of officials, and scribes and most infamously the money changers whose business Jesus interrupted.

The tiny clay seal, or chotem in Hebrew, is about two centimeters (about four-fifths of an inch) in diameter and is inscribed in Aramaic, the day-to-day language of Jews at the time. It says “Pure to God,” which means that the purchaser had paid for an offering to be drawn from Temple storerooms where they could be assured that it met the strict requirements of the sacrifice.

In fact, the seal is so tiny that two cabinet ministers attending a press conference on Sunday to unveil the find struggled to get themselves into a publicity picture with it that would include their faces. But Ronny Reich of the University of Haifa said the seal’s small size belies its importance. “In archeology, size doesn’t count. It’s small but important,” he said.

The day-to-day operations of the Temple from this period are described in the Mishnah, which recorded laws and practices from the time, long after the Temple had been destroyed by the Romans in the year 70 A.D. That is how Reich and Eli Shukron of the Israel Antiquities Authority could surmise what it was used for. But a lot of the details are missing.

“I can imagine that giving the money for this seal, or coupon, which it what it was, was done in some office. In return, you got an offering afterwards from a Temple storeroom,” Reich told The Media Line. “The Temple Mount area was huge. We don’t know where they kept the offerings of different kinds.”

Worshippers would ordinarily buy their offerings in Jerusalem rather than bring them from afar and risk the possibility that after a long journey they would be found to have a defect that made them unfit for an offering.

The area of the Temple Mount, also know as the Haram Al-Sharif to Muslims, is any area that is replete with political disputes as it is with archeological treasures. Israeli archeologists are barred from excavating on the mount itself, which is today the site of the Muslim Dome of the Rock and Al-Aksa Mosque, and so concentrate their efforts on the areas surrounding it.

As a result, the seal is the first of its kind from the era ever found. There might be hundreds or thousands on top of the Temple Mount, but archeologists can’t look for them.


The seal was found near where a bridge linking the Temple Mount with the city below once stood, today known as Robinson’s Arch for the English scholar who first uncovered it. A student volunteers who came to Jerusalem found the seal as they were sifting through tons of dust and dirt hauled away by archeologists digging at the site in the hope of finding a stray coin or other treasure.

Because of where it was found below the Temple Mount there is a good chance it was lost by its original owner, speculated Reich. “All these transactions were done inside the Temple Mount,” Reich said. “Our seal was something that was probably lost because it was found outside the Temple Mount.

The seal’s precise date can’t be known from the object itself, explained Shokrun, but it can be guessed at from the other finds that were found with it. They include oil lamps, ceramic cooking pots and a juglet that may have contained oils and perfume, as well as coins of the Hasmonean kings, such as Alexander Jannaeus and John Hyrcanus.

A reference to such seals, though not this one in particular, appears in Tractate Shekalim of the Mishnah, which was completed about the year 200 A.D.

“Whoever required libation [offerings] would go to Yohanan who was in charge of the stamps, give him [the appropriate amount of] money and would receive a seal from him in return. He would then go to Ahiyah who was in charge over the libations, give him the stamp and receive the libations from him.” The worshipper would take the libations to the priest, who would perform the ritual.

The Mishnah also mentions in Shekalim that there were four or five seals on which were inscribed a calf, ram, kid or sinner. Reich said the seal does not belong to this group, which shows that not all the administration procedures of the Temple were recorded in rabbinic literature.

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Amazing how accurate the Jewish Mishna really is. This certainly strengthens the Jewish claim and historical fact that the Jewish temple actually existed - despite contrary opinions from [politically oriented] certain archeologists and the Waqf...

Just imagine what still exists, or what may have been destroyed by the Waqf, on the Temple Mount itself!

What an interesting discovery....




posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 11:43 AM
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And heres a CBS article on it,

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posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 11:51 AM
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People actually try to claim there was never a temple there?? Where did that big foundation and those pesky walls come from, then?

It boggles the mind.

This is great - thanks for sharing.
edit on 30-12-2011 by Schkeptick because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 12:30 PM
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Its known that the christians did much damage to the temple ruins during the crusades....
The Templars owned the Temple site for some period and they dug it up fairly thoroughly....what they found is a matter of conjecture, but that they found something seems inevitable...
What the Romans and others had left behind is a matter of conjecture.....Though i believe the Ark is supposedly lost inside a cave on Mt Moriah still......At least thats where its last been reported....



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 12:37 PM
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reply to post by stirling
 


That's the general opinion of the Rabbis..

We know that there is a cavern beneath the dome of the Rock, which of course was built on the foundation stone i.e. the holy of holies of the two previous Jewish temples. What's in there, beyond the pictures available online (of the cave of souls) we don't know. It is a series of caves according to the Jewish Rabbis. The part immediately open in the front is where Muslims pray...But there are caves beyond that cave, and it is in there, somewhere, that the Ark is thought to be stored.

If there's any two places on earth that I would just LOVE to explore, it would be the cavern beneath the Temple mount, and the secret caves beneath the great pyramid of Giza....

Oh, and the Vatican archives. They must have some interesting stuff there.
edit on 30-12-2011 by dontreally because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 09:16 PM
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Originally posted by stirling
Its known that the christians did much damage to the temple ruins during the crusades....
The Templars owned the Temple site for some period and they dug it up fairly thoroughly....what they found is a matter of conjecture, but that they found something seems inevitable...
What the Romans and others had left behind is a matter of conjecture.....Though i believe the Ark is supposedly lost inside a cave on Mt Moriah still......At least thats where its last been reported....


Meh, I remember reading somewhere that the Ark was in the temple in heaven,i wouldn't go getting your hopes up on ever finding that, it was either destroyed or taken to heaven.



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 09:20 PM
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I never really doubted the jews existed, it's pretty much common knowledge in the christian histories. If only the modern world was so simple right? Anyone destroying archeaological artifacts should be brought up on charges and imprisoned. Learning about our history is every bit as important because our history helps determine the path we take in the future.



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 12:21 AM
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reply to post by lonewolf19792000
 


There's both a heavenly and physical 'ark', just as there is a heavenly and physical temple, a heavenly and physical Jerusalem...

You need to start reading Kabbalah and Metaphysical subjects. The "Heavenly" ark is what the Ark REPRESENTS - the archetype/concept, which exists in an abstract, spiritual dimension, and so it is called "heaven", to distinguish it from its material manifestation - the Ark.

Everything in creation is a symbol; The Earthly Jerusalem a symbol for the heavenly Jerusalem. The symbolism runs so deep, that the city itself and it's various sections correspond to the metaphysical aspects of the spiritual Jerusalem. The eastern side of the city, called "the old city", was called Shalem by Malchizedek, which means 'peace', or "whole". Malchizedek literally means "king of righteousness", and it is this which brings peace into the world. Abraham conversely was told to go to mount Moriah by God to sacrifice Isaac. Mount Moriah, of course, is where the Temple Mount is located. The western side of Jerusalem, is called "Moriah". After the event, Abraham called the place where he was to sacrifice Isaac, "YHVH Yireh" - which can be translated, "awe of the Lord". Abraham thus contributed the other aspect of Jerusalem - Yireh. Together, Abrahams Yireh, and Malchizedeks Shalem, produce, YiruShalem - Jerusalem.

Awe, is the sense of complete self nullification before the creator, that even sacrificing ones own son (according to the simple meaning of the narrative) wouldn't pose an issue. In the deeper sense, Isaac symbolizes the natural side of man, which one has to sacrifice in order to serve God; thus, while Malchizedek contributed the aspect of Chesed - the right line, Abraham contributed the aspect of Geburah - the left line, even though of the three patriarchs, Abraham corresponds to Chesed.

It really is astonishing how deep this system of metaphysics runs.

Look at Washington DC, for an example of esoteric city planning. It's something thats been done for ages.
edit on 31-12-2011 by dontreally because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 03:00 AM
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reply to post by dontreally
 




What an interesting discovery....


Yes , and what a wonderful job to kill Palestinians to find that temple and make the temple of Solomon.








posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 03:08 AM
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It makes me sick that this thread has devolved into "omg the ark lol" newsflash the ark didn't exist there is no way an ark of that size could have supported it's own weight unless god said "lol oh yeah here's some carbon nano tubes you can use just call it wood though wink wink" much less support the weight of every living animal on earth...fundamentalsts /rolleyes



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 08:08 AM
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reply to post by hmdphantom
 


That isn't the temple of solomon, that temple wasn't open air. That looks more like an obelisk. I'm guessing those are free-masons? Yeah i thought those aprons looked familiar. My dad used to take me with him to his lodge when i was a kid whenever he had meetings. He never made it to shriner, but my papaw did.



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 08:14 AM
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Originally posted by dontreally
reply to post by lonewolf19792000
 


There's both a heavenly and physical 'ark', just as there is a heavenly and physical temple, a heavenly and physical Jerusalem...

You need to start reading Kabbalah and Metaphysical subjects. The "Heavenly" ark is what the Ark REPRESENTS - the archetype/concept, which exists in an abstract, spiritual dimension, and so it is called "heaven", to distinguish it from its material manifestation - the Ark.

Everything in creation is a symbol; The Earthly Jerusalem a symbol for the heavenly Jerusalem. The symbolism runs so deep, that the city itself and it's various sections correspond to the metaphysical aspects of the spiritual Jerusalem. The eastern side of the city, called "the old city", was called Shalem by Malchizedek, which means 'peace', or "whole". Malchizedek literally means "king of righteousness", and it is this which brings peace into the world. Abraham conversely was told to go to mount Moriah by God to sacrifice Isaac. Mount Moriah, of course, is where the Temple Mount is located. The western side of Jerusalem, is called "Moriah". After the event, Abraham called the place where he was to sacrifice Isaac, "YHVH Yireh" - which can be translated, "awe of the Lord". Abraham thus contributed the other aspect of Jerusalem - Yireh. Together, Abrahams Yireh, and Malchizedeks Shalem, produce, YiruShalem - Jerusalem.

Awe, is the sense of complete self nullification before the creator, that even sacrificing ones own son (according to the simple meaning of the narrative) wouldn't pose an issue. In the deeper sense, Isaac symbolizes the natural side of man, which one has to sacrifice in order to serve God; thus, while Malchizedek contributed the aspect of Chesed - the right line, Abraham contributed the aspect of Geburah - the left line, even though of the three patriarchs, Abraham corresponds to Chesed.

It really is astonishing how deep this system of metaphysics runs.

Look at Washington DC, for an example of esoteric city planning. It's something thats been done for ages.
edit on 31-12-2011 by dontreally because: (no reason given)
'

Yeah i know what awe is, i've been humbled before God before. Nullification pretty much fits the description, or a deer caught in the headlights.



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 08:15 AM
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Oh so the Israeli lobby does have a strong connection to the freemason lobby. Interesting.

Also, nobody cares about a 2000 year old coin when people are oppressed. I know I don't. What does that coin do for the hungry? What does it do for the religious mind who are surpressed by their ritiuals and laws? Nothing. At. All.

Worthless discovery.



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 08:20 AM
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Originally posted by rationaluser
It makes me sick that this thread has devolved into "omg the ark lol" newsflash the ark didn't exist there is no way an ark of that size could have supported it's own weight unless god said "lol oh yeah here's some carbon nano tubes you can use just call it wood though wink wink" much less support the weight of every living animal on earth...fundamentalsts /rolleyes


That's a troll post if i've ever see one. If you don't like where the discussion heads, make like a tree and leave.



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 11:19 AM
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reply to post by hmdphantom
 





to find that temple


Huh? Everyone knows where the Temples are - the dome of the ark is built on top of it.




make the temple of Solomon.


The masonic fixation with Solomons temple has nothing to do with Judaism.



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 11:21 AM
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reply to post by rationaluser
 


You're confused.

Were talking about the Ark of the covenant - a square chest which houses the two tablets given by God to Moses, a Torah scroll, and some other holy items - and not Noah's Ark.



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 11:39 AM
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reply to post by rationaluser


It makes me sick that this thread has devolved into "omg the ark lol" newsflash the ark didn't exist there is no way an ark of that size could have supported it's own weight unless god said "lol oh yeah here's some carbon nano tubes you can use just call it wood though wink wink" much less support the weight of every living animal on earth...fundamentalsts /rolleyes

 




Originally posted by dontreally
reply to post by rationaluser



You're confused.

Were talking about the Ark of the covenant - a square chest which houses the two tablets given by God to Moses, a Torah scroll, and some other holy items - and not Noah's Ark.

[color=cyan]*****


Wheeeew !!

What a country !

 

edit on Dec-31-2011 by xuenchen because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 03:17 PM
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reply to post by dontreally
 
I saw an interesting theory some years back - which I need to look into again (I think it was in one of Grant Jeffries' books) that the Holy of Holies was actually where the Al Aqsa mosque is today - which would allow for the Temple to be rebuilt with the Dome of the Rock in place - occupying the Court of the Gentiles (based on the dimensions in Revelation).

Supposedly, there is a raised stone platform in/under Al Aqsa that matches the Ark's footprint? Will see if I can find anything useful on this and update or repost.

EDIT:
Doing some googling on this now, perhaps Jeffries was actually referring to the Dome of the Tablets. Will keep looking.

edit on 12/31/2011 by Praetorius because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 31 2011 @ 05:11 PM
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reply to post by Praetorius
 





I saw an interesting theory some years back - which I need to look into again (I think it was in one of Grant Jeffries' books) that the Holy of Holies was actually where the Al Aqsa mosque is today - which would allow for the Temple to be rebuilt with the Dome of the Rock in place - occupying the Court of the Gentiles (based on the dimensions in Revelation).


Yes...Everyone has their theories about where the Holy of Holies is located. The general and widely accepted opinion is that it is beneath the Dome of the Rock.

In either case, there is a spiritual-theological disparity between Islam and Judaism, although people with little knowledge of either subject like to assume that they are practically the same.

From the exoteric (orthodox) perspective, this may appear to be so, but from the esoteric (metaphysical) it is not at all the case.

Just take a look at the symbolic dimensions of the dome of the rock (and all sacred building, hence masonry, are designed according to occult sciences) - if you know what you're looking at, you'll understand that it is essentially Gnostic. Judaism is not gnosticism. Christianity and Islam, are based on that perennial directive, but not Judaism - Judaism is highly unique because of this.

So from a totally theological perspective - the most important - (especially when you understand the deeper connection between the spiritual worlds and this physical world) the existence of the dome of the rock, AND, Al Aqsa, is a problem for Hebraism. It materializes a different philosophy, and modality of being, between the creator and the created.

If you're interested in comparing the two approaches, read Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzatto's "the secrets of the future temple", which is the first kabbalistic exposition on Ezekiels vision of the future temple.

It should be noted, that this temple is not the one being planned by Jerusalem's temple institute. The temple they plan on building would be in the design of Herod's Temple. The 3rd Temple (it is "3rd" in the sense of being the 3rd unique design, different from Solomon's temple and Herod's Temple) has completely different dimensions. The dimensions are the EXPRESSION of MODALITY. The importance of the Temple mount lies in the belief that it is the physical point on earth where creation unfolds; therefore, the energies of creation are compressed within that one area, and the physical structure built atop it will attune those energies to the symbolic energies the Temples dimensions correspond to. In other words, Mankind's collective unconscious is CONDITIONED by the energies of the Temple! And people wonder why empires have fought over this land, and over the spot of this temple.

But since the issue is at root a theological one, and when I say theological, I mean it in the metaphysical-mystical sense, and not the profane theology of Orthodoxy, this esoteric theology, taught in all mystery schools, is present and underpins all (except Judaism) natural religions. This is the doctrine of the absolute God. True, there are differences in articulation and thus relation between the Christian concept of God i.e Gods incarnation in man, and the Islamic concept of God, i.e. Gods absolute oneness and rule, but at the highest level, there is agreement between Muslims and Christians, and this agreement is the relativity of all moral actions.

This is such a deep idea and it vexes me at my core that so few people have the requisite knowledge to understand this, but it's precisely this moral relativism that distinguishes Judaism from Christianity/Islam/Hinduism/Buddhism etc.

All religions, outside Judaism, teach that once one recognizes the absolute presence of God in all things, then all things lose their particular relevance and importance. The one obliterates distinctions, and by doing so, in Christian language, the "word became flesh", the profanity of physicality loses its effect. This is what Mary Magdalene means. The "mary's" of Christianity correspond to different aspects of the divine feminine, but it Mary Magdalene which is the highest of all - Hence why she is called Magadalene, from the Hebrew Migdal, meaning "tower" !!
edit on 31-12-2011 by dontreally because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 10:33 AM
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reply to post by dontreally
 
That's actually quite a lot of interesting information, friend. Are there by chance any sites you would recommend for good further review on this as it's not something I'm familiar with and would like to learn more about?



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