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Bugs may be resistant to genetically modified corn

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posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 01:56 PM
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Bugs may be resistant to genetically modified corn


www.startribune.com

One of the nation's most widely planted crops — a genetically engineered corn plant that makes its own insecticide — may be losing its effectiveness because a major pest appears to be developing resistance more quickly than scientists expected.

The U.S. food supply is not in any immediate danger because the problem remains isolated. But scientists fear potentially risky farming practices could be blunting the hybrid's sophisticated weaponry.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 01:56 PM
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Apparently the media is doing more than imp-lying that the reason for the concern - to put it plainly is...,

"It's the farmers' fault."


When it was introduced in 2003, so-called Bt corn seemed like the answer to farmers' dreams: It would allow growers to bring in bountiful harvests using fewer chemicals because the corn naturally produces a toxin that poisons western corn rootworms. The hybrid was such a swift success that it and similar varieties now account for 65 percent of all U.S. corn acres — grain that ends up in thousands of everyday foods such as cereal, sweeteners and cooking oil.

But over the last few summers, rootworms have feasted on the roots of Bt corn in parts of four Midwestern states, suggesting that some of the insects are becoming resistant to the crop's pest-fighting powers.

Scientists say the problem could be partly the result of farmers who've planted Bt corn year after year in the same fields.


OK... now check out the reasoning...


Most farmers rotate corn with other crops in a practice long used to curb the spread of pests, but some have abandoned rotation because they need extra grain for livestock or because they have grain contracts with ethanol producers. Other farmers have eschewed the practice to cash in on high corn prices, which hit a record in June.


So... it appears that the farmer, who signed contracts with the GMO seed providers based on the presumed benefit of not needing to worry about pests, should have continued to practice farming as if they DID have to worry about pests....

... making it the farmer's fault for pests that develop tolerances to Bt Corn.

Um.... no.


Seed maker Monsanto Co. created the Bt strain by splicing a gene from a common soil organism called Bacillus thuringiensis into the plant. The natural insecticide it makes is considered harmless to people and livestock.

Scientists always expected rootworms to develop some resistance to the toxin produced by that gene. But the worrisome signs of possible resistance have emerged sooner than many expected.

The Environmental Protection Agency recently chided Monsanto, declaring in a Nov. 22 report that it wasn't doing enough to monitor suspected resistance among rootworm populations.


Wow... the EPA actually dared speak against one of it's principle post-government-service employers? Amazing (pardon the cynicism.)


Monsanto insists there's no conclusive proof that rootworms have become immune to the crop, but the company said it regards the situation seriously and has been taking steps that are "directly in line" with federal recommendations.

Some scientists fear it could already be too late to prevent the rise of resistance, in large part because of the way some farmers have been planting the crop.

They point to two factors: farmers who have abandoned crop rotation and others have neglected to plant non-Bt corn within Bt fields or in surrounding fields as a way to create a "refuge" for non-resistant rootworms in the hope they will mate with resistant rootworms and dilute their genes.

Experts worry that the actions of a few farmers could jeopardize an innovation that has significantly reduced pesticide use and saved growers billions of dollars in lost yields and chemical-control costs.


For some reason I fear the "Monsanto" police will be riding rough-shod over the farmers who now have to "farm as Monsanto dictates..." when most people would question whether fighting evolution is in any way wise or sustainable.

www.startribune.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 02:00 PM
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Yay. Now Monsanto will have free reign to engineer food that is even less like food than the fake food they are already pawning off on us.

I can see the future... All vegetables are made from cyanide laced plastic and cardboard.


As much as I love and adore science and technology, I draw the line at synthetic foods...

~Heff



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 02:03 PM
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is monsanto allowed to continue existing because people are too afraid to destroy it or what??

does it have too much money? too big to fail? seriously, what happened to natural foods?



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 02:22 PM
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reply to post by yourmaker
 


Natural practice is still the only way to go - at least with what we use and ingest.

Vote with your wallets and inform your friends. Let's make this the last generation that suffers from unnatural foods.



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 02:45 PM
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I saw a show about this recently. They were saying the GM corn could not defend itself against parasites. The modified the protection mechanism out of the corn plants, leaving them very vulnerable.



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 03:29 PM
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reply to post by Maxmars
 


regardless of pest resistance - different crops impose different demands on the soil - its basic farming common sense to rotate



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 03:31 PM
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DowAgroScience is now petitioning the US gov't to deregulate a genetically engineered variety of corn that is resistant to 2,4-D, a toxic pesticide that is 50% of the recipe for agent orange

Admitted hereFederal Rgister

So now a once famous weapon of mass destuction will be used to help feed the multitudes. What do you want to bet that the crows won't even touch this stuff?



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 03:32 PM
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First I wanna say that it will only be a matter of time before these bugs will be resistant to any of our pesticides I bet.

Anyway onto the topic itself honestly it really can't fall upon the farmers for the main reason that the farmers are essentially under the thumb of the production places for the seeds. Especially in the movie Food Inc. Which I saw in class and then saw on Netflix (It's on Instant streaming right now for all of you who want to know
. They talk about the various changes we have done to our food and how the control of what we produce goes away from the farmers and to the producers. So in short the fault would certainly lie upon the manufacturers Monsanto to.



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 03:52 PM
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reply to post by Maxmars
 


Did you know that the term "bug" only applies to a category of insects that happen to be able to *suck*?

True....saw it on "QI":

Can't name the exact episode, but there you have it.

Perhaps the "B" series of the show...or, one where they discuss insects? Seen a lot, all blends together after a while.....

Oh, for those unfamiliar with "QI" ('IQ' inverted, and means "Quite Interesting") here is a sample. (Prepare to laugh your [somethings] off):




posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 05:20 PM
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all life is fighting all the time.
only a idiot would make a plant that can not evolve its defense.
like the antibiotics humans keep taking to fight bugs.
we have used antibiotics so much that nature has won the battleagainst us.
we need to make antibiotics the way bugs fight back.
its the same with plants. the evolve in a war with bugs and diseases.



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 06:38 PM
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Is it any wonder all the honey bees are dying w/crap like this?

Trust me if insects won't eat it you shouldn't either!

& take a look at how many food products are loaded w/corn syrup.

Peace



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 06:56 PM
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Would we really want to diminish or kill the insect population of earth to begin with. I don't know but when you plant a garden you plant extra and share with insects, squirrels, birds, you name it.



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 07:26 PM
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It's just evolution, plain and simple. Life finds a way. When ever man gets too smug and full of his belief that he can rule all four corners of the Earth in every way possible from soil to sky, nature sends us a message like this. Unnatural genetic modification can't beat nature's own genetic modification techniques.



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 08:25 PM
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reply to post by Grifter42
 


Brilliant!!!


It's just evolution, plain and simple.


Spot on!!

We will, as we explore, find life ALL over the Solar System, and the Universe. Not always "sentient" life of course, let's be clear on this.



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 11:12 PM
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Originally posted by BABYBULL24
Is it any wonder all the honey bees are dying w/crap like this?

Trust me if insects won't eat it you shouldn't either!

& take a look at how many food products are loaded w/corn syrup.

Peace



No no, it's corn sugar now.

As an avid upland bird hunter in southern Minnesota I can verify that this is in fact happening. One field I hunt has been in corn for 4 years now, many others go 3 or 4 before giving it one year in beans then right back to corn.



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 12:13 AM
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Originally posted by Grifter42
It's just evolution, plain and simple. Life finds a way. When ever man gets too smug and full of his belief that he can rule all four corners of the Earth in every way possible from soil to sky, nature sends us a message like this. Unnatural genetic modification can't beat nature's own genetic modification techniques.


You're dead right. Superweeds and now this!

Go, Mother Nature, go! SAVE US!!



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 02:06 PM
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I hate to be cynical, but I don't think it's going to save us. The wellbeing of humans and the wellbeing of the Earth are two different things.



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