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Madness: Even School Children Are Being Pepper-Sprayed and Shocked with Tasers

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posted on Dec, 27 2011 @ 10:10 PM
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edit on 27-12-2011 by redstorm because: Appropriate actions must be taken when we've got hardened 12 year olds on our hands.




posted on Dec, 27 2011 @ 10:13 PM
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reply to post by dolphinfan
 


Honestly kids have always behaved badly, things you mentioned happened way back when I was a teenager too and the cops didn't pepper spray and zip-tie kids. If they broke the law they were cuffed and hauled in. There's no excuse for this now, how do we expect our children to follow and respect the law when officers don't?



posted on Dec, 27 2011 @ 10:27 PM
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reply to post by dolphinfan
 


I agree with you on the point that if a kid is unfit to be with others in a normal school situation and is prone to often violent outbreaks then yes, they never should have been put into that situation by their parents, but just because this kid was doesn't mean its his fault, and it doesn't mean he should be punished for and uncontrollable mental defect.

IMO if it is truly uncontrollable and the kid doesn't even really know what they are doing or that its even wrong that is MORE of a reason to take care and extra measures to insure the safety and comfort of the child, and is definitely NOT a reason to pepper spray the kid or to cause more suffering and pain to the kid who becuase they don't understand everything and why they were ATTACKED by an officer, backed up by the teacher(people who supposedly are there to care for and teach children) will probably be traumatized and always be that much more unconfortable and scared around people and untrusting of authority, which will only make the kids mental problems even worse.

And by the way you are assuming that this kid was wildly out of control and violent, all that we know was the teacher couldn't handle a "temper tantrum" and the kid was standing up on top of a cabinet, there was no mention of a violent crazed demon tearing up the place.... He was pepper sprayed in the face and fell off of a cabinet and smashed on the floor, I still can't believe your condoning this type of behavior.
edit on 27-12-2011 by WielderOfTheSwordOfTruth because: Spelling mistake



posted on Dec, 27 2011 @ 10:31 PM
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reply to post by Kali74
 


You are exactly right. Kids used to be kicked out of school all of the time if they were deemed to detract from the overall learning experience of those who wanted to be there. That is no longer the case.

I knew many kids who were kicked out of school. Some went to "reform school", got their act together and returned, some just went to work and some went to jail. The notion that kicking these kids out of school will increase the probability that they will go to jail is nonsense. A high school senior reading at the 6th grade level who hangs out at school to be with his friends and to chat up the girls is going to jail at some point, whether he is in school until he is 18 or not.

Lets just be honest about it and kick him out when it becomes obvious that he is not there to have an education.

As far as the special needs kids go, having them "main streamed" does nobody any good. My son is 12 and has a special needs kid in his class. He needs a dedicated person to keep him in his seat, yells out and screams throughout the day and at least once a week soils himself. How does having him in a normal class room help him? By making him repulsive to his classmates because he soiled himself? By making other kids resentful because he is distracting the classroom? These kids are main streamed because it is cheaper for the school and makes the parents feel better about their child.



posted on Dec, 27 2011 @ 10:34 PM
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reply to post by WielderOfTheSwordOfTruth
 


I'm not remotely suggesting that the reaction on the part of the officer was justified. I am suggesting that it might have been and that pepper spraying the kid was the most effective way to keep the kid from harming himself or others.

One side of the story here and as it is wrong to condem the kid (which should absolutely never be done) as it is to condem the cop absent knowing the whole story,including the history of this kid's and this cop's behavior.



posted on Dec, 27 2011 @ 10:35 PM
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I do have a problem with the pepper spray issue , but when i was raising my children, spanking my son had Zero affect, i had always thought that if i shocked him with a 50,000 v stun gun just once, he would always know that from that point forwards he wouldn't want it again


My wife wouldn't let me and now hes grown up to be a 23 year old turd



posted on Dec, 27 2011 @ 11:05 PM
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reply to post by dolphinfan
 


Actually yea your are suggesting it was justified, your not coming right out and saying it was justified but you are definintely suggesting it..


pepper spraying him is the right choice



Perhaps a low dose stun-gun might be a more reasonable alternative



pepper spraying the kid was the most effective way to keep the kid from harming himself or others


I really don't agree that was the best way to keep the kid from harming himself or others, because of the pepper spray the kid fell off the cabinet and smashed on the floor, and like another poster said when you release pepper spray into a closed room EVERYONE is going to feel the affect, how is the the best option for protecting anyone? Picking the kid up bear hug style, or even as another posted said, by wrapping him in a blanket and removing him from the classroom would have been much better, the officer may receive a few minor cuts or bruises but so what hes the adult and thats his job, suck it up, for the children...



posted on Dec, 27 2011 @ 11:39 PM
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Dolphinfan's comments are textbook victim-blaming. If the kids go to school, the cops are lurking around in hallways, classrooms, and even bathrooms waiting to electrocute or pepper-spray them if they misbehave. If the kids skip school, the cops write them tickets for truancy. Why are these kids so disobedient? Because they're trapped in a cage. They're trapped in a school-system designed to domesticate them, teach them lies, keep them busy while their parents earn a meager wage, prepare them for a lifetime of wage slavery, get them to pass mindless tests so the school's funding doesn't get slashed, justify the superintendent's five-figure salary...the disobedient kids are the smart ones. Maybe if you had to go to these schools and have cops strip-searching you every morning, counselors labeling you as mentally defective, and teachers getting fired for teaching instead of passing out standardized tests, you'd be disobedient too.

Anyone who talks about the horrors of life in the inner-city while apologizing for the police has selective observation. Go to the city and you'll find that the police are the ones kicking down people's doors, harassing children and old people, gunning down kids and planting evidence on their corpses, hauling your neighbors off to jail to meet their quota. And who benefits?

I for one am with the kids.



posted on Dec, 28 2011 @ 02:35 PM
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And here I thought the school giving tickets (not a write up, detention slip ect but a real ticket with fines) was going WAY to far.....Then I hear something like this. This is unacceptable. Makes me consider home schooling when my child is school age...heck she seems to know more than the kids going to preschool right now and I know she will learn right from wrong here without fear, feeling like a caged animal. The only flaw in my home school plan I'm not so sure of is socialization with peers would be lacking here....but at least she wouldn't be abused or fined outrageous amounts leaving behind a lovely looking record for the child's future.

Here is an article about the school giving tickets.



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