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How to find the past: Archaeological digs looking for students and volunteers to dig

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posted on Aug, 25 2012 @ 05:28 AM
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Found this.

unitedcats.wordpress.com...
Goner.
... The Goner were a mysterious city building civilization that flourished in central Asia at the same time as the first city building civilizations in China, Mesopotamia, and Egypt. The were located in what is now Turkmenistan and are only now being revealed by archaeology. They were very possibly the first great trading civilization connecting east and west in Asia. For whatever reason their civilization failed and was covered by the sands of time.

Harappan Civilization.
As many as five million people once lived in one of the world’s very first large civilizations, in the Indus Valley in what is now Pakistan and Western India. They lasted for thousands of years (3300-1700 BC.) ... They were only rediscovered about 80 years ago, we know very little about them...




posted on Sep, 5 2012 @ 05:25 AM
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Thanks I'd love to dig.I do it now but that's to lay drainage pipe not quite as rewarding as digging up the past



posted on Sep, 5 2012 @ 07:43 AM
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Originally posted by Devilssecretson
Thanks I'd love to dig.I do it now but that's to lay drainage pipe not quite as rewarding as digging up the past
Keep your eyes peeled...that's actually a pretty good way of discovering a previously unknown site!



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 11:03 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Holy Crap. I had no idea South Australia had so many.



posted on Oct, 18 2012 @ 01:39 AM
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Thanks, Hanslune. If they have any going to Mexico, I'm on board
Tiotihuacan, Mitla, you name it. There's still lots to learn about Egypt, too.....



posted on Mar, 20 2013 @ 09:44 PM
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It seems once again archaeological sites are nowhere near New Orleans. Call me crazy, but I guess a swamp is no place for a dig site. Perhaps near Poverty Point.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 07:44 AM
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Originally posted by wilkinsonus
It seems once again archaeological sites are nowhere near New Orleans. Call me crazy, but I guess a swamp is no place for a dig site. Perhaps near Poverty Point.
Check out local archaeological and historical societies, and universities. Poke around...generally something going on somewhere.



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 10:43 PM
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Location for archaeology field schools for this summer.

Summer archaeology field schools



edit on 12/5/13 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2013 @ 12:19 PM
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Sorry - wrong thread.

SC
edit on 3/7/2013 by Scott Creighton because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 5 2013 @ 02:46 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Update to summer field school

shovelbums.net...



posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 04:53 PM
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I'm currently doing Major and I've been to many sites by now, either excavating as part of the team or doing some kind of data analysis or reconnaissance of an area. Even though some finds were really 'attractive' for local (pre)history and interesting to put in big picture and I really loved doing it, I still dream about being part of huge expensive and world class archaeological dig somewhere in Middle East, Egypt or something like that. I think I'll seriously look into that, but I'm not interested in schools of archaeology as I consider myself somewhat experienced and I know how to do many things already, I'd like to join them for real as part of their team if possible.

I remember reading Renfrew&Bahn's introductory book on my first year, I was fascinated with ways archaeologists do things on some digs of great importance and how well organized everything has to be, but in reality, there are many improvisations and different approaches. Still, I have to see what it's like to be a part of well-funded excavation and how everything works there. Besides, it's super exciting for example to excavate ruins of Uruk, Etruscan tombs or rich burials of Bronze Age.



posted on Sep, 26 2013 @ 03:08 PM
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An online degree in Archaeology

www2.le.ac.uk...


University of Leicester

£16,775, 26,750 USD, 19,850 Euro


Course structure

The BA in Archaeology is made up of three levels, with each level taking two years for part-time students to complete, or one year for full-time students. Each level consists of six modules, lasting 12 weeks each, with short breaks in between. Part-time students study each module in turn, whereas full-time students study two modules at a time.

Level 1 (part-time years 1 and 2; full-time year 1)
•Aims and Methods in Archaeology

Plus five modules from the following:
•Early Prehistory
•Later Prehistory
•Classical Archaeology
•Medieval Archaeology
•Historical (Post-medieval and Industrial) Archaeology
•The Archaeology of Egypt, Nubia and the Middle Nile

Level 2 (part-time years 3 and 4; full-time year 2)
•Archaeological Theory
•The Rise of States in the Old World
•The Mediterranean in the Medieval World
•Interpreting Archaeological Evidence
•Being Human: Evolution and Prehistory
•Fieldschool

Level 3 (part-time years 5 and 6; full-time year 3)
•Households and Families
•Archaeological Practice
•The Archaeology of Urbanism
•Archaeology, Religion and Belief
•Individual dissertation



posted on Sep, 26 2013 @ 03:10 PM
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creativespirit
I'm currently doing Major and I've been to many sites by now, either excavating as part of the team or doing some kind of data analysis or reconnaissance of an area. Even though some finds were really 'attractive' for local (pre)history and interesting to put in big picture and I really loved doing it, I still dream about being part of huge expensive and world class archaeological dig somewhere in Middle East, Egypt or something like that. I think I'll seriously look into that, but I'm not interested in schools of archaeology as I consider myself somewhat experienced and I know how to do many things already, I'd like to join them for real as part of their team if possible.

I remember reading Renfrew&Bahn's introductory book on my first year, I was fascinated with ways archaeologists do things on some digs of great importance and how well organized everything has to be, but in reality, there are many improvisations and different approaches. Still, I have to see what it's like to be a part of well-funded excavation and how everything works there. Besides, it's super exciting for example to excavate ruins of Uruk, Etruscan tombs or rich burials of Bronze Age.


Send a PM to Byrd she is just finishing up her Phd and may up to date information on how to get on those teams, my own information is tad dated



posted on Sep, 26 2013 @ 03:56 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Nov, 15 2013 @ 11:17 PM
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morefiber

Originally posted by MischeviousElf
reply to post by Hanslune
 


Bump
Thank you fantastic,

What a wonderful way as well for many to start the new year, either as an new hobby or to get their hands dirty in an subject they love.


Originally posted by Byrd
reply to post by Hanslune
 

Dearly want to do some Central America stuff ...but good old USA stuff would be fun, too.


You might be able to have your cake and eat it to Byrd


Archaeologists have discovered the ruins of an ancient Mayan city in the mountains of North Georgia believed to be at least 1,100 years old.

When evidence began to turn up of Mayan connections to the Georgia site, South African archeologist Johannes Loubser brought teams to the site who took soil samples and analyzed pottery shards which dated the site and indicated that it had been inhabited for many decades approximately 1000 years ago. The people who settled there were known as Itza Maya, a word that carried over into the Cherokee language of the region.

1,100-year-old Mayan ruins found in North Georgia

Kind Regards,

Elf


Very cool article.

I read that one Cherokee belief is that there is another world that exists underneath our world, and that in this second world things are pretty much the same, except that when it is winter in our world it is summer in theirs and vice versa.
I think people have been in the new world much longer than 12,000 years.



If you consider that the planet can be divided by the Equator into the Northern hemisphere and Southern hemisphere, and that they have opposite seasons, then they are right. When it is Summer in the Northern hemisphere (North America, Europe, it is Winter in the Southern Hemisphere (Australia), and vice versa.

It always amazed me that earlier tribal humans have managed to reach every part of the planet - Innuit in the North Pole, Aboriginal natives in Australia, jungle people in South America.



posted on Jan, 11 2014 @ 09:28 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


I have always wanted to do this. What an opportunity if you are able to make the time commitment. I have forwarded this info on to a few people who this would be awesome for. Thanks for the post.



posted on Jan, 28 2014 @ 09:31 AM
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For those of you in Ireland...
Caherconnell Archaeological Field School
For the rest of you aspiring shovel-bums, time to investigate and join up with a local archaeological society that is planning some public digs!



posted on Jan, 28 2014 @ 01:58 PM
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Wow this looks like fun! Ive always wanted to do something like this, just never knew how to get started.



posted on Mar, 2 2014 @ 12:13 PM
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reply to post by fnpmitchreturns
 


I also wanted to add that there is archological dig at the Bosnian Pyramid od the Sun in Bosnia and Herzegovina. You can find more info there at www.bosnianpyramidofthesun.com...

I also wanted to post that Dr. Semir Osmanagich will be giving a lecture in Toronto about this discovery on April 6th, 2014. For more information please go to www.blissfulhealth.ca...



posted on Apr, 4 2014 @ 08:57 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 

And here's the link for the 2014 field schools c/o shovelbums...Dig!

Keep yer trowel sharp, now!




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