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The mysteries of Mt. Shasta

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posted on Dec, 27 2011 @ 12:38 AM
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reply to post by SunnyDee
 


The caverns are in the surrounding foot hills not the actual mountain it self. Was the a few months ago. They are pretty awesome. The Masonic history in those caves is a bit creepy, they used to do rituals and stuff there. The lake is man made with *3 (I believe) separate towns underneath. What surprises me is the number of people in the surrounding towns that have never heard of Lemuria. I spent part of my childhood in the area, and never heard about them until I was an adult.

edit: There was a recent news article that says Mt. Shasta has a 30% or something like that, chance of blowing in the next 10 years.
edit on 27-12-2011 by calstorm because: (no reason given)


Found it Mt Shasta

Geologists say there's a one in three or one in four chance Mt. Shasta might erupt in north state residents' lifetimes.

edit on 27-12-2011 by calstorm because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 27 2011 @ 01:48 AM
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Originally posted by lonewolf19792000

There was a pre-flood civilzation that existed that sank "beneath the waves" as the waters rose, but it was not located in the pacific or atlantic. It was located in modern day Egypt. How do i know this? Look at the water marks on top of the great pyramid at giza and then the water marks on the head of the much smaller sphinx.


Ah no, you repeating fringe misinterpreted stuff. Where this story comes from are reports from Mesopotamia that reported high water marks on ziggurats, the reports were magically transformed into applying to the pyramids in Egypt. The outer shell of the Giza pyramids was removed a long time after they were built.....limestone doesn't hold a mark of water for thousands of years - mud brick does.


As the waters began to recede the sphinx's head was exposed. This pre-flood civilzation is where the story of atlantis originated from and it is the first city that was ever built and it was built by Cain, the cursed son of Adam. For many years tales have been abound of the "Hall of Records" being located under the sphinx underneath its paws, the hall of records from "Atlantis". Sumerian texts also catalogue a "great flood" event as well.


Which was a river flood - they also tell the story that was the basis of the Noah myth. The HR myth comes from 'mystics' who mysterious made it up.


It is commonly thought by many that Enoch the Sethite built the great pyramid as a monument to God before the flood.


Not 'commonly' more like 'fringely'



posted on Dec, 27 2011 @ 09:14 AM
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must you always ruin some harmless conversation with your anti-metaphysical grudges?

everyone here was getting along very agreeably until someone like you shows up to derail and rain on the conversation.

your post doesn't have anything to do with the op and you only posted to argue with another member

But of course you must try to derail based upon one person's post because you have a grudge against subjects metaphysical.


Originally posted by Hanslune

Originally posted by lonewolf19792000
Look at the water marks on top of the great pyramid at giza and then the water marks on the head of the much smaller sphinx.


The outer shell of the Giza pyramids was removed a long time after they were built.....limestone doesn't hold a mark of water for thousands of years - mud brick does.


oh really?

first of all i'll say that the "outer shell" was not "removed". the outer polished casing stones fell off during an earthquake in 1356.

secondly:
wiki


Some limestones do not consist of grains at all, and are formed completely by the chemical precipitation of calcite or aragonite, i.e. travertine.

Calcite can be either dissolved or precipitated by groundwater, depending on several factors, including the water temperature, pH, and dissolved ion concentrations.

Limestone and (to a lesser extent) marble are reactive to acid solutions, making acid rain a significant problem to the preservation of artifacts made from this stone. Many limestone statues and building surfaces have suffered severe damage due to acid rain. Acid-based cleaning chemicals can also etch limestone, which should only be cleaned with a neutral or mild alkaline-based cleaner.


then you say:

Which was a river flood - they also tell the story that was the basis of the Noah myth. The HR myth comes from 'mystics' who mysterious made it up.


to which i say:

Some say that the original head of the sphinx was a lion's head to match the lion's body. And it has only recently been "reformed" to make a man's head. this would explain why the man's head is disproportionally small compared to the lion body. this also makes more sense when you consider the astrological alignment of the giza plateau, briefly explained here here.


Many of the early Egyptologists and excavators of the Giza pyramid complex believed the Great Sphinx and other structures in the Sphinx Enclosure predated the traditional date of construction (the reign of Khafra or Khephren, 2520–2492 BC)

"The Sphinx stela shows, in line thirteen, the cartouche of Khephren.[13] I believe that to indicate an excavation carried out by that prince, following which, the almost certain proof that the Sphinx was already buried in sand by the time of Khafre[13] and his predecessors [i.e. Dynasty IV, c. 2575–2467 BC]."[14]

Rainer Stadelmann, former director of the German Archaeological Institute in Cairo, examined the distinct iconography of the nemes (headdress) and the now-detached beard of the Sphinx and concluded that the style is more indicative of the Pharaoh Khufu (2589–2566 BC), builder of the Great Pyramid of Giza and Khafra's father.[16] He supports this by suggesting that Khafra's Causeway was built to conform to a pre-existing structure, which, he concludes, given its location, could only have been the Sphinx.[12]

From his investigation of the Enclosure's geology, Schoch concluded that the main type of weathering evident on the Sphinx Enclosure walls could only have been caused by prolonged and extensive rain.[24] According to Schoch, the area has experienced a mean annual rainfall of approximately one inch (2.5 cm) since the Old Kingdom (c. 2686–2134 BC), and since Egypt's last period of significant rainfall ended between the late fourth and early 3rd millennium BC,[25] he dates the Sphinx's construction to the 6th millennium BC or 5th millennium BC.[26][27][28]
Contrary to Schoch's paleometeorological conclusions, recent studies by German climatologists Rudolph Kuper and Stefan Kröpelin, of the University of Cologne, and geologist Judith Bunbury, of St Edmund's College, Cambridge, suggest that the change from a wet to a much drier climate may have occurred later than is currently thought, and that Dynasty IV (the traditional era of the construction of the Sphinx) may still have been a period of significant rainfall; a conclusion also accepted by Mark Lehner.[29] However, Schoch points out that fragile mudbrick structures nearby, indisputably dated to Dynasties I and II, have survived relatively undamaged, indicating that no heavy rainfall has occurred in the region since the Early Dynastic Period.[30]


there's more information about these subjects, if you would like to start learning about them. it seems your view of the pyramids might be a little outdated.
edit on 12/27/11 by metalshredmetal because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 27 2011 @ 09:22 AM
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oops forgot you hate the Hall of Records too!

you can begin your learning here


In Egypt, A.R.E. members Joe Jahoda and Dr. Joseph Schor have been unable to obtain permission to do further additional radar analysis of the 25 x 40 foot underground cavern that they discovered near the Sphinx in 1997. NASA scientists verified the cavern and Jahoda and Schor were allowed to do limited drilling in order to drop cameras down for a better look. Although the cavity appeared to be a natural formation, it made what may be an unnatural, 90-degree turn. Tentative approval was given for a more sophisticated radar analysis to be done in 1999. Due to a bureaucratic snafu, the permits were not approved. In a July 2001 article on the web site of the National Geographic Society, Zahi Hawass, Director General of the Giza Plateau, is said to have recently “urged other archaeologists to join him in a two year moratorium on all excavations in the area from Giza to Aswan.” The only explanation given is Hawass’ concern for the preservation of the existing monuments.

During the summer of 2001, two French archaeologists claimed to have located entrances to hidden chambers in the Great Pyramid of Khufu. Their discoveries were reported in an ABC Online News Service. The French researchers used computerized architectural data from Egyptian funeral designs as well as a technique called macrophotography to analyze hundreds of meters of walls within the pyramid. Although the two men are calling for a joint French-Egyptian effort to uncover the chambers, the response from other Egyptologists, both French and Egyptian, has been less enthusiastic. Zahi Hawass has responded emphatically that he is unaware of any evidence for hidden chambers or cavities in the Great Pyramid.



edit on 12/27/11 by metalshredmetal because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 27 2011 @ 10:44 AM
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reply to post by metalshredmetal
 



oops forgot you hate the Hall of Records too!


No, I think the situation is that you hate to be corrected, I dislike HR as much as I dislike Santa Claus, 22 kilo sized brussel sprouts and the reasons Luxembourg started World war II – for all of those, based on the information we have – don’t exist



you can begin your learning here



Ah, yes natural cavities in limestone equals the HR in your estimation? okay – got anything real? Why don't you explain the scientific basis for the belief in the HR



posted on Dec, 27 2011 @ 11:21 AM
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reply to post by metalshredmetal
 



must you always ruin some harmless conversation with your anti-metaphysical grudges?


Sorry you seem to confused; archaeological comments were made that were wrong – are you saying that one cannot correct ignorance on ATS?


your post doesn't have anything to do with the op and you only posted to argue with another member


In response to a post that you consider on topic you consider my correction of the facts to NOT be connected to the OP? lol


But of course you must try to derail based upon one person's post because you have a grudge against subjects metaphysical.


You seem to have a poor understanding of what is metaphysical and what is not. Perhaps you could define those two terms for us?



first of all i'll say that the "outer shell" was not "removed". the outer polished casing stones fell off during an earthquake in 1356.


The Arab sources record that the outer cladding was damaged in an earthquake in 1302 and full scale removal took place afterwards they built a number of buildings with the stone to include the, The Alabaster Mosque at the Citadel of Salah el-Din, etc

Other comments

Perhaps you could show us pictures of these high water marks on the core stones of the pyramid?

The disputed idea that the Sphinx being older than presently thought doesn’t provide proof of the HR

Here is where the stuff you believe comes from:


“Further, they relate, that the inhabitants) of the west, when they
were warned by their sages, constructed buildings of the kind of the two
pyramids which have been built in Egypt, saying: "If the disaster
comes from heaven, we shall go into them ; if it comes from the earth,
we shall ascend above them." People are of opinion, that the traces of
the water of the Deluge, and the effects of the waters are still visible on
these two pyramids half-way up, ahove which the water did not rise.
Another report says, that Joseph had made them a magazine.......


www.archive.org.../n52/mode/2up/search/water

I believe Biruni is referring to place other than Egypt - you may need to read the actual passage, your 'proof'' is hearsay



posted on Dec, 27 2011 @ 03:48 PM
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What baffles me is why people seem to think that there's an underground city beneath what is essentially a very beautiful volcano. Are the Lemurians immune to lava?



posted on Dec, 27 2011 @ 03:58 PM
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Originally posted by AngryCymraeg
What baffles me is why people seem to think that there's an underground city beneath what is essentially a very beautiful volcano. Are the Lemurians immune to lava?


Short answer: Yes.


Long answer: Feasibility and reality don't always apply to such stories, ideas and concepts! Most are religious and semi-religious in nature, belief is better if unburdened by troublesome facts.



posted on Dec, 27 2011 @ 04:22 PM
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Originally posted by AngryCymraeg
What baffles me is why people seem to think that there's an underground city beneath what is essentially a very beautiful volcano. Are the Lemurians immune to lava?


In every single culture, at some point, there existed a believe in a physical underworld. This belief has been passed down to us in the tradition of folk stories. We now know that our ancestors did live in caves, many of which had extensive underground networks, often opening up into vast caverns, often containing rivers and springs...waterfalls even. We also know that volcanos, while providing health giving warm springs in their dormant period can and will, erupt periodically.

I find it very hard to believe why someone wouldn't understand the likelihood that 'cities' were trapped beneath volcanos. Storytelling does change the facts over time, but it still preserves an essence that allows us to negotiate when seeking out the past. It is from stories and traditions that the first archaelogists of the classical world got their ideas. Of course the Lemurians are not immune to lava, does that mean we should throw the baby out with the bath water. If so called experts, and lol, realists, spent less time laughing at the poor deluded folk, they may just learn to engage a little common-sense in the matter. .

The Ethryians particularly, revered the volcano, their oracle is reported to have been located in a cave adjacent to a volcanic lake in order to enable her to better communicate with this underworld that was located not generally underground, but in a specific location underground. Similarly the Greeks worshipped and utilsed volcanic, and tectonically released gases as part of their oracluar system. The Anatolians also utilised the curative properties of vulcanised waters. The Lemuria mythology, as well as Atlantis, given the physical nature of the regions concerned, given the evolved belief systems...seems pretty obviously to have some basis in fact...and would explain the whole-sale, and seemingly sudden, rejection of the cave as a dwelling place for some peoples in those regions. Caves flooding with lava...not nice...and hardly implausible.



posted on Dec, 27 2011 @ 05:46 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Ah yes, a person with an answer to everything. Gotta love those



posted on Dec, 27 2011 @ 05:54 PM
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reply to post by asen_y2k
 


The same have also been found many years ago in NZ that pre-dates Maori and the Mori Ori



posted on Dec, 27 2011 @ 07:51 PM
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Originally posted by lonewolf19792000
reply to post by Hanslune
 


Ah yes, a person with an answer to everything. Gotta love those


Not everything, I have no answer to; why the Tijuana Brass have not continued to be famous, where the SS City of Boston is or why chicken liver sushi has never taken off!



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 02:55 AM
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As a matter of fact, I'm in Mount Shasta City right now. I've lived here for 20 years, and can put to rest most of these questions.

Thankfully, the local community college keeps a small section about Shasta lore and I've read up a bit because, actually, most people from the area have heard of Lemurians, and I know a fair number of people who have offbeat beliefs about the mountain. There are also sh^tloads of cultists around here -- belonging to more denominations than I can count -- which is one reason why these silly legends persist.

Re: Lemuria. As I recall, a few hundreds years ago, an anthropologist whose name now escapes me formulated a theory to account for similarities between lemurs in Africa and South America. Can you see where this is going? He hypothesized that a land bridge existed in recent prehistory, and that lemurs had a common ancestry in a sunken landmass he JOKINGLY named "Lemuria." Hence the name. Acid-brained cultists inevitably associated this with Atlantis and the myths blurred together. That's literally all there is to the legend of Lemuria, beyond what enterprising individuals have invented to capitalize upon.

Which, by the way, is a theory I read right here on ATS: that the Mount Shasta City Council likes to spread these rumors because it's good for tourism. Considering that Siskiyou County is economically dependent on tourism we should not be surprised that so many fruity rumors are floating around.

As for the caves with the old machines in them. That's pretty vague, but I believe you are referring to Pluto Caves, which are somewhat Northwest of the mountain. I've been in them myself repeatedly, since childhood, and have never even heard of such a thing. That does not mean they don't exist, but again, I suspect someone was just trying to paint a colorful picture.

Probably the most interesting phenomena in the area are the "burial mounds" -- mounds that I can't find any external links to, but there are books about them in the library. I suspect someone knows what I'm speaking about.

Now, most of the rest of Shasta lore has to do either with aliens or fairies or both living in the mountain. The UFO thing became big after the popular image of the disc-shaped craft entered the public consciousness. After that, the mountain's commonly-occurring lenticular cloud formations did the rest of the work.

Is there anything I'm forgetting? The Hat Creek SETI site is about an hour South of here. Sometimes bears eat tourists and the council hushes it up. The cops deal crystal meth out of the trunks of their cars. These are all rumors that I hear everyday, and it's kindof strange to hear only the most erroneous repeated.

Sorry. End rant.



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 03:57 AM
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Isn't Mt. Shasta supposed to be an entrance to Inner Earth lol



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 09:41 PM
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Originally posted by LajanAytik
reply to post by asen_y2k
 


Mount Shasta is the Root Chakra of the 7 Chakra-points of our planet, the other 6 being: The Sexual Chakra, in the Isle of Sun in Lake Titicaca, between Peru and Bolivia, South America. The Solar Plexus Chakra, in the Uluru Kata Tjuta, Australia. The Heart Chakra, in Glastonbury, England. The Throat Chakra, where the great pyramids of Giza in Egypt are. The Frontal (Forehead) Chakra, in Kuah Malaysia, Iran. And the Crown Chakra is Mount Kailash, Tibet.


Who taught you that crap?
....and shame on them.

People keep trying to tie these archeological sites together into a big metaphysical ball of wax and it's lazy. The earth is it's own entiry and superimposing ''human'' chakra's on it is self-delusion. I'm all for metaphysics but garbage is garbage and stinks no matter how pretty a nu-age seminar it came in.

nice to see you left Machu Pichu out of it.....proud of you.



posted on Jan, 1 2012 @ 06:38 AM
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reply to post by Caver78
 

My impression of you:

Your posts are garbage.

Ahh, now I feel better.



posted on Jan, 1 2012 @ 09:09 PM
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Mt Shasta has been misrepresented by non-native people for a long time.....pardon my irritation.


You could have tagged me harder, btw....no offence was taken.



posted on Jan, 2 2012 @ 01:35 AM
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Drove past Mt. Shasta twice this weekend; sighted snow, old lava beds, clouds, ground mist, a variety of trees and the odd human habitation.



posted on Jan, 23 2012 @ 07:32 PM
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Here's a bump, plus a Los Angeles Times article that was recently printed about Mount Shasta. Funny coincidence, huh? We're hardly ever in the news...

www.latimes.com...

The local author they mention, Wallenstein, is the father of a friend of mine. I've met him a few times but didn't know he's tried his hand at writing. There are many local authors like him... in fact, John Keel (author of The Mothman Prophecies) has visited a few times, apparently. I can't vouch for Wallenstein, but the article is a pretty good overview of how the area's lore came to be, how it's exploited (in my view, anyway), and what kinds of events have been occuring in recent years.

Good read if you plan on visiting.



posted on Jan, 23 2012 @ 09:46 PM
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reply to post by Protozoid
 


Yes a good over view of the many tales, myths and legends accorded to Shasta. Far more interesting are the native American stories which are a bit more on target.



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