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Boy's survival from flesh-eating bacteria deemed a miracle by his familly - and the pope

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posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 09:09 PM
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Didn't see this anywhere and wasn't sure where to put it.

The 11-year-old Ferndale, Wash., boy’s stunning recovery from the flesh-eating bacteria that chewed up his face and nearly killed him in 2006 has been officially deemed by the Vatican as a miracle attributable to Kateri Tekakwitha, a 17th-century American Indian woman who converted to Catholicism at a young age.

The pope on Monday signed a decree authenticating the miracle, clearing the way for Tekakwitha to be canonized as America’s first indigenous saint.

usnews.msnbc.msn.com...
Pope John Paul II beatified Tekakwitha in 1980 – the first Native American to be declared “blessed” – a step below sainthood.

Her story is on the site--has anyone heard of her?
It goes on to say that "Usually, proof of two miracles must be attributed to someone who becomes a saint -- one before beatification, one after. But Pope John Paul II waived the first miracle requirement in order to beatify Tekakwitha in 1980, according to the Albany Times Union."

Why? Why waive the first miracle requirement ?
How many out there believe this was a miracle?





edit on 12/20/2011 by Pauligirl because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 09:13 PM
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reply to post by Pauligirl
 


Is there any mention in the article about the name of the bacteria? I was just curious, it sounds like he had leprosy.



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 09:14 PM
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reply to post by Pauligirl
 


Is there a source for full article? I would love to read further.



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 09:18 PM
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reply to post by Pauligirl
 


How could an American Indian women from the 1600's miraculously heal a boy in 2006?

Do you have a link?
It seems like I am missing something here.

At this point I see nothing to tie the two together, not seeing a miracle.

(I guess being agnostic doesn't help me see it either.
)
edit on 12/20/2011 by Chamberf=6 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 09:19 PM
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reply to post by Pauligirl
 


It was a miracle that he survived the bacteria God created to harm him?



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 09:20 PM
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Personally, miracles are similar to bed time stories to comfort children, nothing more.

So obviously i don't think this was a miracle as per definition of a miracle among religious people.

It is a great result for the boy and his family though, and i'm pleased he made it.

I would be more inclined to try to catalog everything the boy ate, drank, washed with, blood tests, what detergent his mum used to wash his clothes, what plants and animals he came into contact with and just about any other tiny clue that might be gleaned from this case, that might shed some light on a possible treatment for others out there suffering from the same thing.

Was being young, and having an abundance of stem cells influential, was his ethnicity and genetic beneficial, and things like that will be of far greater value to finding an effective treatment for this bacteria, than gullible superstition in my view.

If a roomful of others suffering from the same thing, exposed to the bones of the native American woman were all suddenly cured, i'd be looking at the genetics of the tribe she was born to or what she died of herself first.



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 09:27 PM
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Originally posted by Starwise
reply to post by Pauligirl
 


Is there a source for full article? I would love to read further.

Yes, sorry, just edited to add it
usnews.msnbc.msn.com...



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 09:36 PM
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Originally posted by Chamberf=6
reply to post by Pauligirl
 


How could an American Indian women from the 1600's miraculously heal a boy in 2006?

Do you have a link?
It seems like I am missing something here.

At this point I see nothing to tie the two together, not seeing a miracle.

(I guess being agnostic doesn't help me see it either.
)
edit on 12/20/2011 by Chamberf=6 because: (no reason given)


Here’s the connection–sorry about forgetting the link


A priest and family friend, Fr. Tim Sauer, was called in to administer what he thought would be last rites....

The Finkbonners are devout Catholics and Don Finkbonner is also a Lummi Indian. At the urging of Sauer, they began praying for the Blessed Kateri Tekakwitha to intercede on Jake’s behalf....

After numerous surgeries to remove his damaged flesh, Jake suddenly and unexpectedly took a turn for the better on the ninth day of his hospitalization, Sauer recalls. That was the same day that a relic of Tekakwitha was brought to the hospital from the national office of the Tekakwitha Conference, a Catholic Native American religious organization, in Great Falls, Mont.



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 09:36 PM
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reply to post by shug7272
 


Who said God created this bacteria?... You fail to realize the world you live in is full of man-made viruses, man-made bacteria. Our lives revolve around a man-made lifestyle, we're dependent on man-made technology. That is exactly why the world is falling apart, and exactly why it's destruction will be because of man. This is a world created by God, run by humans.



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 10:33 PM
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reply to post by Pauligirl
 





sorry about forgetting the link


That's okay.

Well I see the connection between the two now, but this (IF it is a "healing") would still only be one of the two "required" miracles...

Interesting story. Lucky kid...

Not sure what I think about it though.



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 10:44 PM
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Originally posted by Chamberf=6
reply to post by Pauligirl
 





sorry about forgetting the link


That's okay.

Well I see the connection between the two now, but this (IF it is a "healing") would still only be one of the two "required" miracles...

Interesting story. Lucky kid...

Not sure what I think about it though.


Lucky kid and good doctors. Article says Pope John Paul II waived the first miracle requirement in order to beatify Tekakwitha in 1980, according to the Albany Times Union. I wonder why.



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 11:07 PM
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You know, I have personally seen several healings lately....and experienced it myself for my arthritic knees. I KNOW that God heals, and I think it is happening more lately. The presence of the Holy Spirit is being felt more strongly by so many that I think something huge is happening.....BUT, having said that:

This story is one more example of how the Catholic religion is more a cult than anything else. How can they support 'relics'? Is that not not the same as 'idols'? Why are they praying to this dead woman and giving her credit instead of God? Why is the pope not giving credit to God, the only source of a true miracle? This story is disturbing to me in many ways. I want people to know that there are a whole lot of christians out there that do NOT believe in this cult-like behavior. I have seen miracles, and they had NOTHING to do with relics and praying to dead people: They had to with the presence of the Holy Spirit and an incredible love and healing energy that is available to us ALL.



posted on Dec, 21 2011 @ 04:51 AM
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reply to post by westcoast
 


Could not agree more.



posted on Dec, 21 2011 @ 04:52 AM
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reply to post by Pauligirl
 


Most likely politics, they appear to want a Native American saint. When politics infiltrates religion that religion needs to be looked at.



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