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Canada: The Valley Of The Headless Men - Nihanni Valley.

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posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 02:47 PM
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reply to post by predator0187
 


the headlessness to me says there is a group out there who don't like trespassers. No animal would want a decapitated head save for man. I wonder what the group doing this is like? How their culture is and how much wisdom they have. I wonder if they value the sanctity of life all while continually violating it? (much like us)




posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 02:52 PM
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reply to post by Thisbseth
 


Read "The strangest story ever told" and then tell me you still want to go. I think there is a real similarity between the two legends/stories and that they are dealing with the same entities. Seriously though, I too get chills thinking about going there. Prehistoric is an understatement. Impassible terrain, geothermal hotsprings, carnivores both known and unknown, caves legends and gold. There's definitely a screenplay here, and at the very least one he'll of an ATS exclusive videography of this misadventure.



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 02:53 PM
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reply to post by predator0187
 


Let me know when you want to go, I've got a brother in law in Alaska with a plane, he'd be more than happy to fly us in. You supply food and other supplies, I'll supply the plane and fuel!



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 02:54 PM
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Love this thread!

If any of you are really thinking about getting a group together and going on expidition, you will want to contact the park out there and speak to some of the locals and find out if there is anyone there with a large enough group would guide or know of a guide that would be interested =


Park Information
The outfitters on the river are experts in their own right and can answer many of your questions long before you arrive. For specific information on the park, check the website (www.pc.gc.ca/nahanni) or contact Park Headquarters in Fort Simpson (867/695-3151). The Fort Simpson Visitor Centre (867/695-3182, mid-May–mid-Sept. 9 a.m.–8 p.m.) has park displays as well as relevant videos and books for visitor use.


Source



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 03:05 PM
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Originally posted by Anmarie96
Love this thread!

If any of you are really thinking about getting a group together and going on expidition, you will want to contact the park out there and speak to some of the locals and find out if there is anyone there with a large enough group would guide or know of a guide that would be interested =


Park Information
The outfitters on the river are experts in their own right and can answer many of your questions long before you arrive. For specific information on the park, check the website (www.pc.gc.ca/nahanni) or contact Park Headquarters in Fort Simpson (867/695-3151). The Fort Simpson Visitor Centre (867/695-3182, mid-May–mid-Sept. 9 a.m.–8 p.m.) has park displays as well as relevant videos and books for visitor use.


Source


Pshhhh, everyone knows you have to bring your own native american guide. He's supposed to have a name that sounds reassuring too, like Running Bear or something.... and from experience let me say make sure you pay him AFTER he has kept his end of the bargain.



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 03:06 PM
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www.worldatlas.com...

Here is a link to world atlas that describes the area and history as a much more hospitable area than what yor info does, this also claims it is warmer than other areas even more southern but does not explain why. Sounds like an interesting place, I'd love to go, definitely will be taking numerous reliable firearms if a do get the chance!



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 03:09 PM
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reply to post by HumbleHelper
 



"its probably the alien species that live at the center of the earth. taking the heads of people who enter there territory"


My imagination is pretty wild....
edit on 20-12-2011 by Thisbseth because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 03:10 PM
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reply to post by yamammasamonkey
 


There is even a golf resort there now, I guess it has been explored a little more than previously thought!



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 03:12 PM
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reply to post by The Undertaker
 


AIN'T SKEERED!!!



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 03:12 PM
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Very interesting story and read. I have nothing to contribute so just replying to subscribe and keep up with this....star and flag!



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 03:20 PM
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The NWT is a lovely place in July... warm, long sunny days with the sun only going down for a couple of hours a night. The mosquitos can be a little daunting, though, so be ready for that.

In winter, it's the opposite, with only a couple of hours of light and bone-chilling temperatures. The mosquitos, though, have disappeared.

With well over a million square kilometers of terrain, which includes forests, lakes, wild rivers, mountains and tundra, you'll surely be noticed among the small population of just over 40,000. Think on that for a sec... 40K people in such a huge area. Having lived there, I know how it works... nobody is a stranger and, once you've been there, you won't be forgotten.

I think anyone wanting to visit the Nahanni Reserve would be well advised to first contact the park rangers in Fort Simpson for advice on necessary equipment, bush pilots and permits.



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 03:20 PM
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reply to post by Gwampo
 


Winter is coming...



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 03:28 PM
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reply to post by Mescalito
 


Not coming, here.

Tomorrow is the winter solstice and the day with the least amount of light.

Good news is, the days only get longer until the 21st of June.


Pred...



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 03:29 PM
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Im definitly in and headed straight for the caves with a goat and some slim jims as offerings
I'm not scared
can't promise i wont pee a little
How many can actually pass up a real adventure not me



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 03:36 PM
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reply to post by yamammasamonkey
 


Mmmm Hmm- have you ever shivered yourself to sleep? Been stalked by a bear? Dreamed about the sun appearing from behind rain soaked clouds and when it does the Mosquitos are so big and numerous you swear with one more bite you might faint from bloodloss? That's the easy part of an expedition like this.
I'm going to go ahead and un-volunteer for this lil sojourn.



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 03:55 PM
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reply to post by The Undertaker
 


Oh come on you cant give up that easy!!! lol



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 03:58 PM
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When I was living in Yellowkife, the largest concentration of people in all of the NWT, I used to enjoy packing a lunch and walking out of town. This entailed climbing the big rock outcrop behind my home and working my way from that one to the next.

The entire area around Yellowknife is choc-a-bloc with these big tall rocks worn smooth by successive glaciations. I wouldn't try it on a wet day and certainly not in the winter... too slippery and breaking a leg out there would be life-threatening.

In between those rocks are little flat areas made up of soggy tundra, with little stunted trees growing in them. Getting around through that mess is rather useless, so you just keep on rock hopping.

The best part of climbing up was that you can still see the town's communication towers on the high ones, because, if you lose sight of those, you're depending on the sun, which, rather than really identifying north and south, just kinda circles around in the sky, Knowing what time it is, and where the sun should be at that time, is really important. That is, IF you even know which direction Yellowknife is in.
Going too far on these wanderings is extremely dangerous even if you only go a few kilometers.

Interesting story: When I was up there in the early 70's, I used to deliver things from the airport to the jail outside of Yellowknife. Guess what... no fences.
If someone wanted to escape, they could just go for a walk because they had the choice of either going into town (where the RCMP had a significant force stationed) or the lo-o-o-ong journey into the wilderness. Walking to the next town would be a real test of physical endurance.

Now, put yourself in Nahanni, hundreds of kilometers from any road or town.



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 04:01 PM
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Here is a Pic of the Headless Valley

Lush and Secluded

Kinda reminds me of the movie Congo...sometimes you should not delve to deep



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 04:19 PM
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reply to post by Thisbseth
 


I gave up being cold and miserable a year ago and moved to Maui. Still have a home in S.E. AK. for the SHTF scenario. The lure of the North is compelling and not without rewards and I have to admit this area has intrigued me for years. Driving across the Yukon and northern BC in the winter was amazing. Especially so was Liard Hotsprings in sub zero temps. Rolling in the snow and jumping back in the sulfuric hotsprings was very cool.

It's really hard to imagine just how beautiful and deadly this area of the world is. One slip, and you have to be airlifted out. Exposure can be an issue even in the summer, and for an extended trip with more than 5 people it will take multiple floatplanes full of gear. A logistical nightmare this trip is.



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 04:22 PM
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Wow, so cool! Thanks for sharing, definitely going to do some research into this for myself. I live in Canada as well and have never heard of this.

Just wanted to add one thing that relates to the tropical landscapes and temperatures, I lived in the Yukon for a few years back in the early 90's. In the small town of Carcross, they have the worlds smallest desert! I visited with my family and it was super cool. You drive along the highway and all of sudden instead of forest and mountains you get sand dunes and cacti so I guess anything is possible.

Many interesting tales and things up in the north of Canada, a truly amazing place!





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