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People Stink!

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posted on Dec, 18 2011 @ 01:31 PM
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Literally.

Why do people have to wear so much darn perfume and cologne? I just do not get it.


I'm in a situation now where I interact with a lot of people everyday. Male and female. At least half of them have an over-whelming scent that lingers long after they are gone.

I guess people must get used to their own scent and they have no idea how much they are putting on because they are sort of immune to it. I wonder do they realize what it can do to other people? It can trigger asthma attacks,allergic reactions, wheezing or a tight chest. It can cause headaches, nausea and sometimes hives.
I hugged someone the other day and I smelled like her perfume all day and had a headache until the next time I could shower.

It's even worse when they smoke or when they also use shampoos, hairsprays or body lotions that also have a fragrance. It just gets all wrapped up into one awful, over-whelming stench.

A good rule of thumb to remember is that one is really only supposed to smell perfume in an embrace or right near your immediate person - not before they even see you or long after you leave.

And for mercy's sake - if you get fragrance for Christmas, learn how to use it without making the rest of us miserable or sick!




posted on Dec, 18 2011 @ 01:37 PM
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Guess I should return that bottle of perfume I was going to give you for Christmas....



posted on Dec, 18 2011 @ 01:43 PM
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Its called sensory adaptation. They dont even smell it after a while so they tend to put more and more on.



posted on Dec, 18 2011 @ 01:48 PM
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reply to post by kosmicjack
 

Well I guess I won't invite you over for Taco Night at my house.




posted on Dec, 18 2011 @ 01:48 PM
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reply to post by kosmicjack
 

Another perspective. An Asian friend of mine told me once that he hates to go to American restaurants because the people in there all smell like fat. Like the grease from cooking meat. We are what we consume.

Maybe the smells of pefumes are stronger these days to feed our ever increasing vanities. We need more spice, flashier cars and the newest phone thingy. Good for you for pointing that out to me. I don't have a sense of smell, so I now know what I am not missing.



posted on Dec, 18 2011 @ 01:54 PM
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reply to post by kosmicjack
 


Yeah this stuff is so volatile and nasty. My family does not understand my sensitivity to the chemicals. I get very mad and irate. I don't like brain fog and headaches. They use scented detergents,soaps, hair sprays etc...I told my cousin to discontinue using her hairspray because it is likely the trigger of her irregular heartbeat and she is only in her mid 30's...

How can be people be so appreciative of poison scents? I think you should post a follow up on the health forum regarding Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Awareness.

Just recently I had to make an emergency bowel movement and the only place was the dreaded shopping mall...I dashed through the fragrance aisle and god it was good to smell urine of a public restroom instead of chemical fragrance.

I think most people fail to understand how bad the chemicals are. Many people tell me that I am exaggerating. I then pose a challenge to them...I ask them to ingest a single teaspoon of the fragrance orally. None of them will take me up on the challenge.

The single greatest contributing factor to childhood cancers and asthma is fragrance based products.



posted on Dec, 18 2011 @ 01:55 PM
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I understand how difficult it is for those who do not like scents.. especially for those allergic.

I personally love the smell of colognes and perfume..though some do put it on too heavy.

I'd rather smell perfume or cologne , over bad breath , poor hygiene/or BO problems....and the methane gasses some people emit from time to time.
edit on 18-12-2011 by gabby2011 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 18 2011 @ 01:57 PM
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Hey better those scents


then smelly B.O right ?


Some people really need those scents to cover up there naturally excreating body odor. You should be greatful they come in with something plesant then nothing at all ! then you will be like omg whats the smell ! and wanna puke



i'll take perfume over b.o anyday



posted on Dec, 18 2011 @ 01:59 PM
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Originally posted by RightWingAvenger
reply to post by kosmicjack
 

Just recently I had to make an emergency bowel movement


I know its childish but I'm still laughing


A star to you sir.



posted on Dec, 18 2011 @ 02:05 PM
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reply to post by RightWingAvenger
 





The single greatest contributing factor to childhood cancers and asthma is fragrance based products.


I think that is very misleading and false..please show the research for this..?


A number of studies are examining suspected or possible risk factors for childhood cancers, including early-life exposures to infectious agents; parental, fetal, or childhood exposures to environmental toxins such as pesticides, solvents, or other household chemicals; parental occupational exposures to radiation or chemicals; parental medical conditions during pregnancy or before conception; maternal diet during pregnancy; early postnatal feeding patterns and diet; and maternal reproductive history. Researchers are also studying the risks associated with maternal exposures to oral contraceptives, fertility drugs, and other medications; familial and genetic susceptibility; and risk associated with exposure to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).



High levels of ionizing radiation from accidents or from radiotherapy have been linked with increased risk of some childhood cancers. Children with cancer treated with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy may be at increased risk for developing a second primary cancer. For example, certain types of chemotherapy, including alkylating agents or topoisomerase II inhibitors (e.g., epipodophyllotoxins), can cause an increased risk of leukemia.

Recent research has shown that children with AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome), like adults with AIDS, have an increased risk of developing certain cancers, predominantly non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Kaposi sarcoma. These children also have an additional risk of developing leiomyosarcoma (a type of muscle cancer). Certain genetic syndromes (e.g., Li-Fraumeni syndrome, neurofibromatosis, and Gorlin syndrome) have been linked to an increased risk of specific childhood cancers.

Children with Down syndrome have an increased risk of developing leukemia. Low levels of radiation exposure from indoor radon have not been significantly associated with childhood leukemias.

Ultrasound use during pregnancy has not been linked with childhood cancer in numerous large studies. Residential magnetic field exposure from power lines has not been significantly associated with childhood leukemias.

Pesticides have been suspected to be involved in the development of certain forms of childhood cancer based on interview data. However, interview results have been inconsistent and have not yet been validated by physical evidence of pesticides in the child’s body or environment.

No consistent findings have been observed linking specific occupational exposures of parents to the development of childhood cancers.

Several studies have found no link between maternal cigarette smoking before pregnancy and childhood cancers, but increased risks have been related to the father’s smoking habits in studies in the United Kingdom and China.

Little evidence has been found to link specific viruses or other infectious agents to the development of most types of childhood cancers, though investigators worldwide are exploring the role of exposures of very young children to some common infectious agents that may protect children from, or put them at risk for, developing certain leukemias.



posted on Dec, 18 2011 @ 02:09 PM
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reply to post by AllUrChips
 


I was always clueless about that... I would wonder why the smell would "wear" off so quick in my mind, then I'd pass by someone and they'd ask what cologne I was wearing. I would also spray more thinking that it had already wore off, then I'd be told why I was bathe in it while I could barely smell it.



posted on Dec, 18 2011 @ 02:10 PM
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reply to post by RightWingAvenger
 





I think most people fail to understand how bad the chemicals are. Many people tell me that I am exaggerating. I then pose a challenge to them...I ask them to ingest a single teaspoon of the fragrance orally. None of them will take me up on the challenge.


Thats ridiculous.. do you wash with soap?..even unscented?

I challenge you to eat some of it..



posted on Dec, 18 2011 @ 02:19 PM
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Originally posted by gabby2011
I'd rather smell perfume or cologne over the methane gasses some people emit from time to time.
edit on 18-12-2011 by gabby2011 because: (no reason given)


I can see why a woman holding a candle would have that opinion. Sorry, couldn't resist.


OT I do totally understand OP although I can't say it's something I have really noticed with men too much. Some of the younger woman here however do seem to bathe in the stuff. I also (not often) encounter a smell that is sadly worse. To my nose it is like someone has used the aerosol toilet freshener (the stuff you spray in the air after sending a large message away in the toilet for further processing, for the pleasure of the next user's nose) instead of a proper perfume. It is really euwww!



posted on Dec, 18 2011 @ 02:31 PM
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If you walk into the main floor of a large department store you will find, often quite near the entrance, their fragrance department.

I still can't understand how that is allowed indoors when smoking isn't.



posted on Dec, 18 2011 @ 04:06 PM
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reply to post by gabby2011
 


I like perfume, but I hate the very strong types. I like the soft powdery scents, that you really don't smell unless someone is very close. Don't laugh, but there is a very inexpensive cologne I love called "Love's Baby Soft" It's light and fresh....My favorite and the only kind I wear is Bijon...it smells so good, but just a fresh soft scent that isn't really noticeable unless you are close.
edit on 12/18/2011 by StealthyKat because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 18 2011 @ 04:19 PM
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Originally posted by StealthyKatscent that isn't really noticeable unless you are close.


And that's exactly how it's supposed to be worn.

I wear perfume myself but I was taught to spray it into the air, lightly, and walk through it, that way just the essence or hint of it remains on you for when you are intimately close to someone.

The rest of everything else I use is unscented or fragrance free, from cleaners to soaps. When my Mom comes to visit she brings her perfume, hairsprays and lotions along with their smells. Invariably, my kid will have a wheeze by the time she leaves. And even when we clean her room and bath after the visit, the smell still lingers. We've tried to talk about it but it always ends in her pouting, despite the solid evidence of my poor wheezy child.

It's really NOT personal - it's for health reasons.



posted on Dec, 18 2011 @ 04:24 PM
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reply to post by kosmicjack
 

It might sound mean but I mean it well. Have you considered switching bottles/sprays on her?
I saw it in a movie. Glue instead of shampoo, and my own invention would be switch the hairspray for flyspray (obviously you will need to switch the labels around too). Seeing as how the subtle approach is not working too well....



posted on Dec, 18 2011 @ 04:57 PM
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reply to post by LightSpeedDriver
 


LoL! No! She's my Mom.... I feel bad even having to mention it at all.



posted on Dec, 18 2011 @ 05:12 PM
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Yup , grandmas 60 tear old perfume that has been fermenting in a box at the back of the closet is some nasty stuff . If compared to paint stripper you can buy at the hardware store , that would be pretty close . When putting 5 to 6 variations of grannies toxic fluid together on a greyhound bus . Wow .



posted on Dec, 18 2011 @ 05:37 PM
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You know what else stinks to high heaven? Dryer sheets

My child's little buddy reeks of them when he comes over. Poor kid.

They cannot be healthy. It has to get the residue all over the clothes and thus your skin. On Saturdays and Sundays you can smell it all over our cul-de-sac. I guess it's a result of laundry day.


And while we're at it - Febreeze. It just covers up the stink with yet more stink. Just a different stink.



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