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Voluntary Institutionalization

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posted on Dec, 17 2011 @ 06:51 AM
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I work at a camp one of many hundreds possibly thousands of camps throughout northern Alberta and Saskatchewan. This one in particular is very strict and absolutely does not allow a work to drive up alone however flights are provided to most sub contractors. No alcohol(after a day of hard work it'd be nice to pop back an Ice cold one), no drugs(completely understandable), restricted access to and from the camp which could involve a suspension in employment for threat of the above two. Quiet times and random drug searches with tight security. They are setting up 40 more wings and bringing in RCMP to police the area as well. The foods quality severely fluctuates and often leaves workers taking a sick day. Every 2-3 week turn around(all workers must have at least 7 days off every 24) we give ourselves to this experience which leaves all role psychologically exhausted. I may be nit picking but that's what I think. Perhaps that's the reason why all those FEMA camps are being built down south. Is job corps the same way??? Anyones thoughts appreciated.




posted on Dec, 17 2011 @ 07:31 AM
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Many years ago,

The U.S. had the Civilian Conservation Corps


The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was a public work relief program that operated from 1933 to 1942 in the United States for unemployed, unmarried men from relief families, ages 18–25. A part of the New Deal of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, it provided unskilled manual labor jobs related to the conservation and development of natural resources in rural lands owned by federal, state and local governments. The CCC was designed to provide employment for young men in relief families who had difficulty finding jobs during the Great Depression while at the same time implementing a general natural resource conservation program in every state and territory. Maximum enrollment at any one time was 300,000; in nine years 2.5 million young men participated.

The American public made the CCC the most popular of all the New Deal programs.[1] Principal benefits of an individual’s enrollment in the CCC included improved physical condition, heightened morale, and increased employability. Of their pay of $30 a month, $25 went to their parents.[2] Implicitly, the CCC also led to a greater public awareness and appreciation of the outdoors and the nation's natural resources; and the continued need for a carefully planned, comprehensive national program for the protection and development of natural resources.


this could be started up again any time, with "changes" to fit the times !

read all about it.



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