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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

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posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 10:48 AM
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My my my , an injection and all your fears go away ? In the research in double blind studies according to the article a shot or two can cure your ills . Are they on the road to making robots of people that have stressful situations ? Although the studies have a long way to go , they say it shows promise in more applications other than Vets returning from war zones .

Is it just delaying the inevitable from returning , or wiping out short and long term memories ? Misuse in the wrong hands on dosages used on different individuals and metabolism rate have from I could gather are not mentioned in the article . Sure they would cover all aspects including any side effects as with other drug usages , but some of the side effects are even scarier to some when they make them known . Drug them up and send them back to the front lines , the invention of the robo soldier . Yikes .

www.popsci.com...




posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 10:53 AM
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I have PTSD and there's only a couple things that help with it, one can't be mentioned here, another is alcohol, but the prescription medications are just awful and have lots of side effects that just make someone worse. You can't go wrong when you go holistic.



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 11:03 AM
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I still say and will always conclude that cause of the stress needs to be dealt with . Not just piecing the person back together , the initial stress causing situation or stress causing person has to be fixed . War zone or work place , people snap when having their buttons pushed . The whole going postal some years back could of used this and probably had some say in the research as well as the Vets .



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 11:20 AM
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reply to post by watchdog8110
 

I can't find the link just now, but a lot of the major "Going Postal" cases you see reported in the MSM are often actually a result of the prescription medication some people take. There was a recent case here in Holland. A (I believe 19 year old young man) walks into a large shopping precinct and sprays passers by with one of these semi-automatic weapons using hundreds of bullets. He had a mental condition and suicidal tendencies. He had been in a mental patient institution and was I believe also medicated. During his "death stroll" he was wearing a bullet proof vest. Afterwards he took his own life. He was also a legal member of a gun club and allowed to be in possession of 5 firearms.

I won't go into T&C contravening detail but some of the psychedelics have shown to be quite effective at treating certain conditions as stated in the linked article. Like a ...natural brain shock. It resets things.
Source
ETA He had a history of psychological and psychiatric problems, including paranoid schizophrenia
edit on 14/12/11 by LightSpeedDriver because: ETA and source added

edit on 14/12/11 by LightSpeedDriver because: Typo



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 12:03 PM
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reply to post by LightSpeedDriver
 


My now former boss sure could use some fixing up , his nick name from all his actions and spoken words over the years make him a perfect candidate imo for some serious head work . With people that keep getting bypassed under the radar from TPTB , it is safer to get as far away as possible rather than putting yourself at risk by staying around them . I would rather be alive and unemployed than a statistic of a boss that should of been examined when they knew of his actions from snapping previously .



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 12:09 PM
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I deal with PTSD daily and have for twenty-seven years. And, as far as "cures" and "treatments" go, I've been down just about every road available. I've been prescribed SSRI's, benzodiazapines, atypical antipsychotics, over the counter herbal remedies (such as St. Johns Wort), taught self hypnosis and biofeedback, and NONE of it works worth a damn.

My life is basically narrowed down, these days, to "power through and take as little Xanax as possible (I do have a legit prescription)".

The idea of an instant remedy, especially of the type discussed seems surreal and highly unnatural. But, having said that, if my doctors were to suggest it, I think I would seriously consider the option.

It'd be nice to sleep for an entire night for a change.

Just my .02 cents.

~Heff



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 12:17 PM
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Originally posted by watchdog8110
I still say and will always conclude that cause of the stress needs to be dealt with . Not just piecing the person back together , the initial stress causing situation or stress causing person has to be fixed . War zone or work place , people snap when having their buttons pushed . The whole going postal some years back could of used this and probably had some say in the research as well as the Vets .


1. Too many people simply do not understand PTSD.
I have PTSD and deal with it every day. I will for the rest of my life.
PTSDis a response to a learned experience, and cannot be " cured".
TSD isn't a virus.

2. Beings ( animal and man) all experience PTSD.
It's a survival mechanism, designed to keep us alive.
Once we experience a seriously traumatic situation our brain litterally forms new neural pathways that ilicit a "Danger/Fear" response in us, to prevent us from foolishly re-entering that dangerous situation again.
In other words:
Our brain makes us fear the situation that caused so much trauma and causes us to feel a real response to any thoughts of the traumatic event.

I personally feel PTSD is mis-named and mistreated.
It's a natural response to traumatic and dangerous situations, meant to keep us alive.
PTSD can only be dealt with and treated, it cannot be "cured".


.



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 12:47 PM
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Any attempts by medical researchers to de-sensitize people through drugs is all well and good from their perspective to fix an issue . Some people are wired differently and respond just as differently than someone else would in a similar situation . Would core values that a person was raised in play a part as to who would be more likely to suffer from tragic situations , possible .

Conditioning of people prior to sending them into battle to change their way of thinking via through propaganda in the news be seen as a small part of dealing with PTSD ? Maybe , maybe not , but if we are all dropped into a mass traumatic situation . The mess it would have created , well I cannot even begin to count the number of people that would be in the same boat with those in the direct firing lines or indirect lines . The media sources have to take some responsibility other than saying our report contains graphic material .

Does there really need to be images of mangled bodies causing a shock and awe effect for ratings . No , yet it still happens in some form of conditioning , I suspect . Really though the people who cannot deal with death and destruction being called wimps/babies is not justified , it is easy for those not subjected it to write it off so easily for their well being . Embedding reporters into war zones only aggravate matters when they distract soldiers from their focus on the task at hand . As far as my opinion goes anyway .



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 12:59 PM
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yes while people's moral upbringing/compas will obviously affect what types of events cause PTSD, we can all experience it.
You can surely raise a stone cold sociopathic killer who won't feel a thing, but you can't train a soldier not to "feel" in a few weeks of Basic Training.

Shock scenes from the media have nothing to do with it, they are a weak substitute for the real thing.

Tough soldiers can experience PTSD.
I have worked selling equipment to Federal LEO depts, and have trained them in it's use, and I'm as tough as anyone.
All that training means nothing.

I experienced a VERY traumatic situation, where my perception of theway things were was shaken to it's very core........and after many years, I cannot get the very vivid scenes from my thoughts.
Every day, every night, every minute of every day.
I have to occupy my thoughts, as the memories of the experience have become ny "background" thoughts.
They are always there, and I have to TRY to think of other things to get them out of my head.

I can only guess that any "drugs" would attempt to numb the thoughts, and IMHO, that's like drinking away your problems.
It just doesn't work that way.

Sounds like these guys just do not understand PTSD at all.

.



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 01:07 PM
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The treatment of PTSD thru drugs rarely has positive outcomes. I have a very close friend that deals with this daily, and I have watched him be prescribed various medications to treat him. Most of the drugs either cause serious side effects, or make you a zombie....In my friends case at least, the best thing he is able to do is talk about the things he feels with people he trust. Sometimes it takes a while for him to relax, but at least the rest of his day isn't wasted being a zombie. Drugs are just the wrong way to go for PTSD (in most cases, but not all).



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 01:12 PM
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reply to post by isyeye
 



I definitely agree that the drugs currently available are not recommendable (based upon personal experience). In my case, at least, the catch-22 is that the ones that help also happen to be addicting and, therefore, cannot be taken very often - to avoid that addiction.

Talking hasn't helped me. If you were to search through my posts here, on ATS, you'd find a treasure trove of overly personal information. I am not a repressed type. I don't worry. I am not naturally anxious. IE I don't fit the "typical" PTSD profile. And, yet, here I am.

The truth, I believe, is like my doctor once told me... Big pharma won't come up with a medication that works simply because there isn't enough of a demand to justify it. They only research in areas where the profits would be astronimical. So, for PTSD, and all other psychiatric disorders, they simply serve up the Prozac and the sedatives.

Sad situation, really. I promise you that if the President of any of these big pharma companies ever finds himself with PTSD - there'd be a cure within about a week.

~Heff



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 01:27 PM
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Would hunters have a better coping mechanism than someone who has not ? Skinning a deer is different than skinning a bear , a lost friend of mine described skinning a bear is like skinning a person . Somehow it never really felt that way to me , but since having been raised around relatives that took the life of an animal for food on the farm . Plus having taken Taxidermy did not make it all that tragic or traumatizing . Gutting fish where you have to get your hands in there , it was what needed to be done to feed yourself .

Day in day out working on a kill floor of a slaughter house surely has some effects on those people .

Chopping the head off a chicken for food at the supper table is quite different than chopping the head off another human being that's in a whole different league of it's own . The personal connection one makes as part of a functioning team , I can understand why not making a friend would make it easier for some . WWII for example how soldiers relayed that not getting to close to someone helped them get through part of the pain when loosing a fellow soldier .

They deserve all the respect for what they had to endure .
edit on 14-12-2011 by watchdog8110 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 01:33 PM
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reply to post by Hefficide
 


As I've heard many times about the drug industry.....there is no money in a cure.

They would rather just patch you up, so they can give you more drugs tomorrow.



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 01:43 PM
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Originally posted by watchdog8110
Would hunters have a better coping mechanism than someone who has not ? Skinning a deer is different than skinning a bear , a lost friend of mine described skinning a bear is like skinning a person . Somehow it never really felt that way to me , but since having been raised around relatives that took the life of an animal for food on the farm . Plus having taken Taxidermy did not make it all that tragic or traumatizing . Gutting fish where you have to get your hands in there , it was what needed to be done to feed yourself .

Day in day out working on a kill floor of a slaughter house surely has some effects on those people .

Chopping the head off a chicken for food at the supper table is quite different than chopping the head off another human being that's in a whole different league of it's own . The personal connection one makes as part of a functioning team , I can understand why not making a friend would make it easier for some . WWII for example how soldiers relayed that not getting to close to someone helped them get through part of the pain when loosing a fellow soldier .

They deserve all the respect for what they had to endure .
edit on 14-12-2011 by watchdog8110 because: (no reason given)


Having a "Hunting Culture" background would be a factor in battle related PTSD, however, PTSD is not limited to the battlefield.
Im an avid Hunter and Fisherman.

My PTSD has absolutelynothing to do with war, a military tour or anything like that.
It had to do with a very personal traumatic experience.
It was not a "physical situation" that caused my PTSD.


Again PTSD is a natural response to danger that has helped us evolve and survive as a species.

You ever see a hunting dog become "Gun shy"?
It's PTSD telling them to avoid that loud noise at all costs.
Thier brains have developed new neural pathways that cause a fear/flight/fight response whenever they are around a similar situation.
If traumatic enought they spend their lives being cautious of anything that resembles the cause of the trauma, even obsessing on avoiding it.

I wish Doctors would look at PTSD from this perspective.



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 02:17 PM
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Originally posted by isyeye
reply to post by Hefficide
 


As I've heard many times about the drug industry.....there is no money in a cure.

They would rather just patch you up, so they can give you more drugs tomorrow.


So true , going through the motions of test here then test there in some instances not related to the PTSD the professionals hesitate in going to an MRI for conclusive evidence . Can see this as going along those same lines of procedures .



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 02:57 PM
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I actually read in my moms O magazine, yep folks, I"m talking Oprah......

That MDMA is being researched for PTSD and a whole host of mental problems....I also read that there are psychiatrists out in Cali who actually use MDMA to treat their wealthy patients who are willing to pay enough for it. From what I gathered it is pretty lucrative albeit black market business.

I do not think any drug is the answer to PTSD, but I think if there is any drug currently available to treat PTSD, MDMA seems a ton better than something like Xanax. The fact it is currently illegal is unfortunate in my opinion. MDMA is an empathogen, which I think is key in dealing with trauma. All drugs have side effects but if properly used under a therapists direction, MDMA could help people come to terms with their trauma in an emotionally safe way. I hope they continue testing and perhaps in the future, this might become an option for those who suffer.

And for the record, I do not suggest running out to a rave and downing some ecstacy to combat your problems....the street drug is dangerous, MDMA is less dangerous, but it is still a powerful drug and class A felony last time I checked.

Sorry if this violates any of ATS rules, but I think it is something people should be aware of. If I have over stepped on this subject, let me know I am not trying to get in trouble!

psychcentral.com... role-in-treatment-of-ptsd/15778.html

www.maps.org...


www.dailykos.com... -On-Board-to-Treat-PTSD-with-MDMA!



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