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Scientists develop an Ultrafast Camera that records at the Speed of Light - WOW !

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posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 01:59 PM
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reply to post by NowanKenubi
 


That would be very! cool!

I noticed the "lines" before and after the light in the video. I wonder what those lines are. It's almost like a fuzzy area before and after the light.

I would love to play with this stuff hands on!!!




posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 02:11 PM
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reply to post by theRhenn
 


I would say the lines are the "print" of the light, reflecting on the many surfaces it touches. The bottle is curved and transparent, so the lighting effect is bound to be bent as it passes through the bottle..

And yes, I'd like a camera as soon as possible, please!



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 02:19 PM
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Originally posted by theRhenn
the bison particle?


Finding a bison particle aint gonna be hard,eh?
*MOOOO*.....*SNORT*
Sorry ; )


Anyway,how can we see anything in a video that's being recorded at the speed of light?Shouldn't it be as big as the universe?Or really bright?Or something.



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 02:38 PM
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Originally posted by zatara
reply to post by tauristercus
 


Good stuff.....scientific knowledge is growing rapidly and wish I was here over 200 years...

But why are all these geniuses at US universities talking with an accent..?


That's the covetedNon farm worker visa



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 02:47 PM
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A star and flag. Thanks so very much for this!



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 03:00 PM
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Dissapointing.

Impressive as it is, it is really just a camera version of a stroboscope.
Taking multiple shots at strobed intervals of the reflected light of many many different pulses, each with a slightly different delay.
The impressive bit, I suppose, is the very short exposure times.


edit on 14-12-2011 by alfa1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 03:07 PM
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And then of course there is the speed of light itself:

"Light, which normally travels the 240,000 miles from the Moon to Earth in less than two seconds, has been slowed to the speed of a minivan in rush-hour traffic -- 38 miles an hour. "

The Harvard University Gazette



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 03:15 PM
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this is probably a stupid question as it may not even apply to any of this but would recording the double slit experiment with this technology show us anything cool?



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 03:24 PM
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I have seen a video taken of lightening at super high speed but this is a factor of at least a 10,000 times faster! I hope they can get it or something similar out in the field to photgraph some natural phenomenon like lightening!



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 03:41 PM
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reply to post by HolgerTheDane
 


I know people like to believe that we have actually slowed light to highway speeds, but that's not the case. There are two different velocities at play here: one is phase velocity (akin to how fast waves move through water), and the other is group velocity (akin to how fast the water, itself, is moving). The photons move with a group velocity which is always equal to 299,792,458 m/s. The phase velocity, on the other hand, can essentially be anything we want to make it. It could even, theoretically, be negative. This does nothing, though, to change the actual speed of the photons, which, again, is always constant and always equal to the "speed of light".



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 03:44 PM
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reply to post by xxblackoctoberxx
 


It would definitely be cool to see the double-slit experiment in action, but the very act of recording it in any interesting detail would interfere with it. The wave interference pattern would go away and the photons would act like particles, just as they do when the experiment is rigged to predictably send specific photons through specific slits.



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 04:39 PM
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If your car could travel at the speed of light, would your headlights work? - Steve Wright



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 04:53 PM
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We always think of light speed as unimaginably fast, however in slow motion it looks incredibly slow.



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 05:07 PM
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It's like 500 cameras in a row, each one detects (takes a picture of) the same photon.
if the photon changes ( direction or wavelenght) then some information can be derived from that.

Anybody know how the detectors work?
edit on 14-12-2011 by Semicollegiate because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 05:46 PM
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reply to post by Ericthedoubter
 


I dont play with this stuff every day. I'm a tech with very little knowledge about this facinating subject of light and what particles are made of... Oh yeah.. I suck at spelling!


But hay....



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 05:47 PM
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post removed because the user has no concept of manners

Click here for more information.



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 06:11 PM
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reply to post by tauristercus
 


Amazing... the possibilities are endless....
I have wondered if the way we see will eventually be upgraded to give us the ability to see in new ways. Perhaps into other dimensions...



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 06:30 PM
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I have an old Box Brownie camera that works at the speed of light. Thats how it works, you open the shutter and when the film is exposed BAM!!! you have an image. And it can detect more than one photon at a time, its amazing. I think this thread should be titled differently, may something to do with shutter speed.



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 10:07 PM
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Originally posted by alfa1
Dissapointing.

Impressive as it is, it is really just a camera version of a stroboscope.
Taking multiple shots at strobed intervals of the reflected light of many many different pulses, each with a slightly different delay.
The impressive bit, I suppose, is the very short exposure times.


edit on 14-12-2011 by alfa1 because: (no reason given)
Thank you.

I thought for a moment that I was the only person that listened to the explanation provided in the video. The guy said 'virtual' camera. If you think about it, what they are doing is similar to taking a single photograph of the lead horse at different points in many different horse races. neat and all, but not what I pictured in my mind when I read the title of the thread.



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 10:14 PM
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I watched two videos over this earlier and I must say wow. Amazing. Great post, should have done so myself.




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