It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Yes; Breast Cancer Incidence is Dependent Upon Dietary Factors.

page: 2
5
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 3 2012 @ 11:59 AM
link   
reply to post by DevolutionEvolvd
 


Thank you so much for all of your hard work - it will obviously take some time for me to read and examine these studies.

I am concerned about the effect of low carbohydrate diets on kidney function and its obvious potential to throw diabetics into a state of ketoacidosis.

I will need some time to absorb this before I can discuss anything further.

Tired of Control Freaks




posted on Jan, 3 2012 @ 01:40 PM
link   
To devolutionevolved

Just to clarify, can you verify if this correct:

1. A high carb diet is one where the caloric contribution from carbs is greater than 50 % of the daily total
2. A moderate carb diet is one where the caloric contribution from carbs is greater than 30 % of the daily total
3. A low carb diet is one where the caloric contribution from carbs is anything less than 30 % of the daily total and can be as low as 5 %

4 The difference in the caloric contribution from carbs in a low or moderate carb diet from a high carb diet is contributed by some combination of increased calories from fat and protein

5. A simple carb is one that is high on the glycemic index and readily enters the blood stream as sugar (ie fruit)
6. A complex carb is one that is lower on the glycymic index and requires some digestion before it enters the blood stream as sugar. (whole grain bread)

is this all correct?

Tired of Control Freaks



posted on Jan, 3 2012 @ 02:33 PM
link   
reply to post by TiredofControlFreaks
 


Those are very valid concerns.

There is a general misunderstanding about low-carbohydrate diets and their effects on renal function. As I stated earlier, low-carb usually also means high-protein. Mainstream consensus is that excessive protein intake can impair renal function. The studies on which this myth are based actually tell a different story. It's very clear that increased dietary protein intake does not adversely affect kidney function in healthy individuals whose kidneys are working properly to begin with.

Protein-enriched meal replacements do not adversely affect liver, kidney or bone density: an outpatient randomized controlled trial.


These studies demonstrate that protein-enriched meals replacements as compared to standard meal replacements recommended for weight management do not have adverse effects on routine measures of liver function, renal function or bone density at one year.


Renal function following long-term weight loss in individuals with abdominal obesity on a very-low-carbohydrate diet vs high-carbohydrate diet.


This study provides preliminary evidence that long-term weight loss with a very-low-carbohydrate diet does not adversely affect renal function compared with a high-carbohydrate diet in obese individuals with normal renal function.


Very low-carbohydrate diets for Type 1 diabetics can be dangerous if not closely monitored. It can be done, but it's not easy. See Dr. Burnstein Here: www.drbdiet.com...

Type 1 diabetics, though, are the only individuals that should be concerned with ketoacidosis when consuming a low-carb diet. Type 2 diabetics and healthy individuals simply enter a state of ketosis because they have the ability to produce insulin.



posted on Jan, 3 2012 @ 03:22 PM
link   

Originally posted by TiredofControlFreaks
To devolutionevolved

Just to clarify, can you verify if this correct:

1. A high carb diet is one where the caloric contribution from carbs is greater than 50 % of the daily total
2. A moderate carb diet is one where the caloric contribution from carbs is greater than 30 % of the daily total
3. A low carb diet is one where the caloric contribution from carbs is anything less than 30 % of the daily total and can be as low as 5 %


There's no real clear definition. It really depends on who you ask. But that's a fair assessment.


4 The difference in the caloric contribution from carbs in a low or moderate carb diet from a high carb diet is contributed by some combination of increased calories from fat and protein


That's correct. Mainly fat.


5. A simple carb is one that is high on the glycemic index and readily enters the blood stream as sugar (ie fruit)

6. A complex carb is one that is lower on the glycymic index and requires some digestion before it enters the blood stream as sugar. (whole grain bread)


This is also very unclear. It depends on who you ask, again. And in what context. There's quite a bit more ambiguity here.

Glucose and fructose, for instance, are both simple carbohydrates. However, they are absorbed and metabolized completely differently in the body and have different effects on the body. Glucose goes straight to the blood stream and spikes "blood sugar", thereby spiking insulin levels, and can be metabolized by just about every cell in the body. Fructose, however, is transported directly to the liver, can only be metabolized by the liver and has no direct effect on insulin levels.

Here's Wikipidia's stance on it: en.wikipedia.org...


Historically nutritionists have classified carbohydrates as either simple or complex. However, the exact delineation of these categories is ambiguous. Today, simple carbohydrate typically refers to monosaccharides and disaccharides and complex carbohydrate means polysaccharides (and oligosaccharides). However, the term complex carbohydrate was first used in slightly different context in the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs publication Dietary Goals for the United States (1977). In this work, complex carbohydrate were defined as "fruit, vegetables and whole-grains".[15] Some nutritionists use complex carbohydrate to refer to any sort of digestible saccharide present in a whole food, where fiber, vitamins and minerals are also found (as opposed to processed carbohydrates, which provide calories but few other nutrients).


Some simple carbohydrates (e.g. fructose) are digested very slowly, while some complex carbohydrates (starches), especially if processed, raise blood sugar rapidly. The speed of digestion is determined by a variety of factors including which other nutrients are consumed with the carbohydrate, how the food is prepared, individual differences in metabolism, and the chemistry of the carbohydrate. The USDA's Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005 dispensed with the simple/complex distinction, instead recommending fiber-rich foods and whole grains.[16]


The glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load concepts have been developed to characterize food behavior during human digestion. They rank carbohydrate-rich foods based on the rapidity and magnitude of their effect on blood glucose levels. Glycemic index is a measure of how quickly food glucose is absorbed, while glycemic load is a measure of the total absorbable glucose in foods. The insulin index is a similar, more recent classification method that ranks foods based on their effects on blood insulin levels, which are caused by glucose (or starch) and some amino acids in food.



edit on 3-1-2012 by DevolutionEvolvd because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2012 @ 11:51 PM
link   
reply to post by DevolutionEvolvd
 


Can you direct me to research implicating high levels of blood insulin with the incidence of breast cancer

Tired of Control Freaks



posted on Jan, 15 2012 @ 11:53 PM
link   
reply to post by TiredofControlFreaks
 


What do you say to the idea that although higher protein diets may initially cause more wieght loss - over the long term (2 years or more), there is very little difference between the two diets?

Tired of Control Freaks



posted on Jan, 17 2012 @ 08:00 PM
link   
reply to post by TiredofControlFreaks
 


jnci.oxfordjournals.org...

www.einstein.yu.edu...

I absolutely agree with diet being a contributing factor. But let us never waste and opportunity to place some blame on Monsanto as well:

www.preventcancer.com...


edit on 17-1-2012 by kalamatas because: typo



new topics

top topics



 
5
<< 1   >>

log in

join