The Ancient Race / Giants of Eastern Asia / China - Picture Heavy!

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posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 09:02 PM
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reply to post by WatchRider
 


This is what Joseph P. Farrell wrote:

"An ancient Japanese legend has it that the Japanese people are descended from a blonde haired blue eyed race that came from the stars, a legend remarkably similar to the doctrinces that percolated in the secret societies that fostered and mid-wifed the Nazi Party into existence in Germany between the World Wars. Nor did this legend play a small part in the history of World War Two, for it was partly because of its mere existence that Hitler could proclaim the Japanese 'honorary Aryans' and conclude the incorporation of Japan into the Rome-Berlin-Tokyo Axis without contradicting Nazi Party racial ideology. This was in no small part due to the Japanese ambassador in Berlin's diplomatic skill in pointing out this little known fact of Japanese legends to the Germans. Of course, there were pressing military and political reasons for Italy and Germany to conclude an alliance with Japan, but for the race and ideology obsessed Nazi government, so much the better if the Japanese had some sort of Nordic-Aryan connection, no matter how tenuous that might be."

From page 117 of "Reich of the Black Sun: Nazi Secret Weapons & The Cold War Allied Legend"

I found this astounding, but since I believe the blue-eyed Blond ETs created homo sapiens sapiens thru genetic engineering of a native Earthling hominid, the legend is basically true for all humankind in existence today (one species).

And NO, I am NOT a Nazi.
edit on 20-12-2011 by AuranVector because:
edit on 20-12-2011 by AuranVector because: (no reason given)
extra DIV




posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 09:24 PM
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Originally posted by WatchRider
reply to post by atomicn
 


Well actually, you are an opinion-holder, not the truth or the actual source of it.
I'm a believer in the races so you're just gonna have to deal with it aty.

I can tell you I've never seen a Chinese or Asian (East Asian) with blue eyes.
However if there are I'd take that from the ancient times legacy when a lot of 'mixing it up' went about.


I have seen a full-blooded Japanese man with gray eyes. Weird.
Also I remember a half Japanese, half American Caucasian girl who not only looked completely Caucasian, but had green eyes and naturally blonde hair -- really rare, a genetic anomaly. Most "half & half's" I've seen looked "mixed" or the Aisan dominates -- which is consistent with the genetic model since light eyes and light hair are recessive traits.



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 09:53 PM
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Originally posted by WatchRider
Temple Images collated and ready for viewing on ATS via YT.



Thanks, WatchRider, for putting this on video. Really makes your point much clearer.
Too bad this wasn't ready to be posted on the OP.



posted on Dec, 20 2011 @ 10:07 PM
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Originally posted by WatchRider

Originally posted by Cythraul
Interesting thread. What I don't get is... the 'sky gods' look like modern Chinese just with blue-eyes. They don't look anymore caucasian overall than a modern Chinaman. My feeling is that if these are depictions of an ancient race of teachers/gods, then they would have had other non-Chinese features - perhaps lighter hair or narrower faces.

Many caucasians have blue eyes, but I've met Turks, Indians and even Africans with blue eyes too.


That's because of the Caucasian tribal migration's and ancient settlements going on back in the day.
Something that still startles the unknowing...

Back to our friends on the temple images.
This is a new one I missed on the first upload batch:



I need some help with this but, he seem's a bit Caucasian looking to me...


Agreed. In fact most of the "gods" depicted in this temple's paintings look more Caucasian than the stereotypical Chinese. But it needs to be made clear that all Chinese do not share the same general physical features.

Some Chinese (especially from the north) are quite tall, white-skinned, with more chiseled or finer facial features than the Chinese from the south (the shorter, darker "Malaysian" type). Clearly the majority of Chinese are a mix of the two distinct types of "Mongolian." And then to make it more confusing, there are other races (North European type Caucasian and the Turkic Caucasian) blended in the border areas of China.



posted on Dec, 22 2011 @ 11:12 PM
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Thanks for your post Vector.
Do you have the source of this mysterious Japanese legend?
I too have heard of it's rumours but no firm link as yet...

Also I do notice that in numerous Manga cartoon's there are characters with fair-features, blue eyed, spikey blond hair etc.
Interesting.

Going to the temple today (a different Chinese one)...



posted on Dec, 23 2011 @ 11:09 AM
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Originally posted by WatchRider
Thanks for your post Vector.
Do you have the source of this mysterious Japanese legend?
I too have heard of it's rumours but no firm link as yet...

Also I do notice that in numerous Manga cartoon's there are characters with fair-features, blue eyed, spikey blond hair etc.
Interesting.

Going to the temple today (a different Chinese one)...


If you mean a source beyond Joseph P. Farrell's book? No.

As for Manga characters having light eyes & light hair, I heard something on a TV show (years ago) that the Japanese FAVOR or have a fascination with blond hair & blue eyes. For that reason, the Japanese often hire blonde models to pose for their magazine ads.

I have my own theories on these things which are not mainstream.



posted on Dec, 23 2011 @ 11:43 AM
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reply to post by WatchRider
 


I forgot to mention a strange Asian myth I read many years ago (before I developed an interest in conspiracies or UFO's)

The story goes like this:

The torrential rains came, lasting 40 days & 40 nights until the entire land was flooded. A single man was able to escape the rains & ensuing flood by climbing up a mountain top and hiding in a cave. When the rain stopped and the man was able to leave the cave, he realized he was the sole survivor of his people. He wept in despair & loneliness.

Then he noticed a bright dancing star in the sky. The star grew brighter & larger until it came all the way down from the sky and landed before him. From out of the bright "star" stepped out a beautiful young maiden. The man was overjoyed that he had been given this maiden as a bride. The star maiden was really the Sun Goddess in disguise and that is why all of the descendants of this couple are "Children of the Sun."

When I first read this story years ago, what struck me was the odd coincidence of the Biblical 40 days & 40 nights of rain. Later (when I began to consider that UFO's just might be real), I was struck by the "dancing star that landed."

This story also reminds me of Charles Fort's question, "Does it ever occur to people that we might be property?" (I paraphrase here, I do not have the exact quote.)

I've been racking my brain trying to remember which book I read this story in. The story was accompanied by watercolor paintings illustrating the story. The book was old, originally published way back in the 60's or 70's -- probably long since out-of-print.

I thought the story might be Japanese (the "Children of the Sun"), but I cannot find anything to substantiate that idea. The Japanese do not have "Flood Myths" as far as I can tell. However, the Chinese do have flood myths.

Another mystery.



posted on Dec, 23 2011 @ 12:29 PM
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Originally posted by AuranVector
reply to post by WatchRider
 



This story also reminds me of Charles Fort's question, "Does it ever occur to people that we might be property?" (I paraphrase here, I do not have the exact quote.)

I've been racking my brain trying to remember which book I read this story in. The story was accompanied by watercolor paintings illustrating the story. The book was old, originally published way back in the 60's or 70's -- probably long since out-of-print.

I thought the story might be Japanese (the "Children of the Sun"), but I cannot find anything to substantiate that idea. The Japanese do not have "Flood Myths" as far as I can tell. However, the Chinese do have flood myths.

Another mystery.



Charles Fort's quote was;

The Earth is a farm. We are someone else's property.





I've been racking my brain trying to remember which book I read this story in. The story was accompanied by watercolor paintings illustrating the story. The book was old, originally published way back in the 60's or 70's -- probably long since out-of-print.


The story is probably made up; I've not heard it before except in relation to fringe material
edit on 23/12/11 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 23 2011 @ 12:57 PM
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reply to post by WatchRider
 


You might enjoy doing more reading about the culture and gods and heroes as you go along your journeys. The paintings are VERY new and not at all the same colors and so forth as the original art. Your interpretations are interesting, but you might have enjoyed the real story behind the pictures.

For instance, the "This one is ordinary hero's going on their adventures etc. The indigenous people's more than likely. " (your second picture, I believe) is actually the god, Monkey, beginning his journey and those are not indigenous peoples. He's meeting two of the heroes who will help him on his journey to heaven. There's a whole set of legends about him (very nice, very uplifting.)

In fact, what you are interpreting appears to be a series of pictures illustrating "Journey to the West" with Monkey. The one you title "Big chubby god, blue eye's with an offering being made by a local: " is indeed an offering, but the "local" is a child and I believe the offering is to Hotei, who is considered a protector of children. One of the other panels shows the legendary "Peach Boy" (as closely as I can tell from the photos.)

"This is a blue-eyed Chinese featured goddess, interestingly she's attacking what looks to be a reptilian being." is actually the goddess Kuan Yin, talking to a dragon.

In addition, the Seven Lucky gods are shown in numerous places -- the most distinct are the fat and jolly (and half clothed) Hotei and the very old Jurojin (god of longevity.)

More about these deities here (wikipedia)
Lovely art, but very modern. If you want to impress him, go back and talk about Monkey.

Many legendary heroes ride tigers, as do some of the gods.
edit on 23-12-2011 by Byrd because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 23 2011 @ 01:01 PM
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Originally posted by scary

Originally posted by Skyfloating
Good work.


You might find this of interest too: Of Emperors and Sky Gods


Your compilation is outstanding. If all but the quotes is your work, might I suggest that you submit it for publication in the new magazine MindScape? I think it would be a good fit for your work. (just google MindScape Magazine, it's based in the UK and I kinda know the editor, hence the suggestion as I think it is a good fit. It certainly is of interest in comparing mythos. I have a nice assortment of NA teachings and have been comparing and contrasting ever since.


The problem is, if they have anyone of Chinese origin associated with them, they'll look at the speculations and say some unkind and uncomplimentary things. The illustrations are from one of THE four classic Chinese books, the story of Monkey... it's called "Journey to the West. Classic story, one of the best known.

They'll also recognize the Lucky Gods as easily as I did.

The illustrator is modern and is probably doing the blue eyes stuff from a manga influence. But the story is very ancient.
edit on 23-12-2011 by Byrd because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 23 2011 @ 08:37 PM
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Originally posted by Hanslune

Charles Fort's quote was;

The Earth is a farm. We are someone else's property.


Thanks, Hanslune, for the quote. As I recall it was from Charles Fort's book, "Book of the Damned" or was it "Lo" -- I can't find my copies.


The story is probably made up; I've not heard it before except in relation to fringe material.


Do you remember what fringe material you found the story in?

The story seems to be some kind of cultural amalgam, as if some Asian society had been influenced by Christian missionaries (the 40 days & 40 nights of rain) and interwove that bit with their own native flood myth. (As you probably know, Flood Myths are almost universal.) I believe the myth of a people descended from a star maiden to be an authentic ancient myth and a remnant of something that actually happened to their people.
edit on 23-12-2011 by AuranVector because: (no reason given)
edit on 23-12-2011 by AuranVector because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 23 2011 @ 08:42 PM
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reply to post by Byrd
 


Thanks, Byrd, for the storylines. I'll have to look up "Journey to the West."



posted on Dec, 23 2011 @ 10:30 PM
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reply to post by Byrd
 

Thanks, there's new pictures I've taken of a temple further to the south of the capital.
In it there's a similar picture of the dragon but being 'fought' by a male god.
Just getting around to uploading them later on today!
Stay tuned folks



posted on Dec, 23 2011 @ 10:35 PM
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Originally posted by AuranVector
reply to post by Byrd
 


Thanks, Byrd, for the storylines. I'll have to look up "Journey to the West."


I'm getting the feeling that what Bryd said was similar to the legend of Viracocha in the America's.
It could well be that an advanced sea-faring tribe (or possibly airborne?) visited and influenced the ancients in the Chinese area's back then.



posted on Dec, 24 2011 @ 11:41 AM
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Originally posted by WatchRider

Originally posted by AuranVector
reply to post by Byrd
 


Thanks, Byrd, for the storylines. I'll have to look up "Journey to the West."


I'm getting the feeling that what Bryd said was similar to the legend of Viracocha in the America's.
It could well be that an advanced sea-faring tribe (or possibly airborne?) visited and influenced the ancients in the Chinese area's back then.


Not at all similar, I'm afraid. I do love the "Journey to the West" tale -- see if you can find a good translation or an abridged version (there's good rewrites of it.) The Viracocha tale is actually reported by a Spaniard (based on what his wife told him) and may have some cultural contamination elements in it (his understanding of HER cosmology.)

Looking forward to the pictures of the Buddha and the bodhisattvas! I have always loved Oriental works of art and literature; one of my real treasures is a letter from my dad (during the Vietnam War) when he wrote down a version of the KwanYin legend told to him by his translator.

The Chinese civilization is by the way, one of the oldest ones on the planet.
edit on 24-12-2011 by Byrd because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 24 2011 @ 10:33 PM
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reply to post by Byrd
 


Yes, well you have your bias I suppose.
Viracocha by no means from a single source btw either.

You really are the opposition to an earlier white tribal migration theory in the Asian and Americas aren't you?



posted on Dec, 24 2011 @ 11:07 PM
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Originally posted by WatchRider

You really are the opposition to an earlier white tribal migration theory in the Asian and Americas aren't you?


I believe you are referring to a misunderstanding of the term 'caucasoid', as it is applied to certain of the earliest skeletons we have from the peopling of the Americas, is this the issue?



posted on Dec, 25 2011 @ 01:09 AM
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Originally posted by WatchRider
reply to post by Byrd
 


Yes, well you have your bias I suppose.
Viracocha by no means from a single source btw either.

You really are the opposition to an earlier white tribal migration theory in the Asian and Americas aren't you?


I'm confused... we were talking about pictures in a Buddhist temple, and I identified the bodhisavatas. I hadn't actually encountered a "white tribal migration theory", though it wouldn't match with what the archaeology says (as far as I am aware, best research shows multiple migrations from both Northern Russia/northern China to the west and northern Europe to the east. The migrations (at least from the west) begin long enough in the past that the earliest sites here in the Americas are about 20,000 years old (Mesa Verde, some sites in Georgia.)

I'm not entirely sure what the deity Viracocha has to do with this. He's not a bodhisavata, and certainly not similar in many respects (other than being a generic sun deity) to other cultures of the same time period. He was also changed by the Spanish conquistadors; legends they retold about this deity are very different from the ones recorded by the people. They're not even from the same time period.

I'm tired... so I'm not getting the connection, there. Perhaps you could explain?



posted on Dec, 25 2011 @ 10:36 PM
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Not wanting to get off the track of the thread too much I will conclude on the Viracocha matter that from the moment the Spanish forces reached the mainland (and possibly beforehand also), word of their presence was instantly likened to that of the historical and near-mythical Virachoca / Qetzcotl. White, bearded warriors with advanced technology enjoyed a significant force multiplier due to this very real although misguided connection to Viracocha. The significance of this CANNOT be understated. To understand it will open your eyes more to the truth.
This fact is a ringing truth when a force outnumbered many times, in a hostile country managed to prevail against the impossible. A deed still recognised as unusual in even todays history books.

The critics of a ‘mother-culture’ connection is that there was no Viracocha, no advanced tribe and is supported by a biased and bribed scientific community that for the past 50 years or so has hushed-up, supressed and remained ignorant to anything that might challenge the warped and misguided out of Africa theory.
Off Topic. Bryd, I suspect that you adhere to their doctrine, or at the very least keep to the ways of being a belligerent skeptic.
As a moderator I believe you should know better than to undermine the ATS quest to deny ignorance.



posted on Dec, 26 2011 @ 10:54 PM
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reply to post by WatchRider
 


I'm surprised there aren't more people posting on this thread. It's probably just bad timing. Most people are swamped with Christmas & New Years. I will try to post tomorrow, but getting ready for the first day of the New Year is huge for me.





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