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I want to start math over... From the beginning.

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posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 09:41 AM
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reply to post by zigmeister
 





Fine by me. 😄 I don't know how the mod will see it, but I don't mind one bit.


I hear you...I think it is a critical tool in mathematics and before long you'll be using one yourself...so hopefully the mods let it slide...it's in the realm of trouble with math.

There was some awesome feed back from ATS'ers...proud moments on ATS when people come together to solve a problem...good job everyone

edit on 8-12-2011 by jerryznv because: ...




posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 10:17 AM
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reply to post by zigmeister
 


Is it not funny that somehow school ruined math for a majority? ...my hypothesis is this: math textbooks are engineered to confuse rather than enlighten. This of course causes a chain reaction ending with a mathmatically illiterate populace. very convienient considering we are being hung on a finacial noose based on math!



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 10:25 AM
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If I can do math, anyone can do math. It is just a language that anybody can learn. I have said, "I can't do math", man was I wrong. I started with remedial math and ended with PDE's( that's partial differential equations) which I found to be a reasonable place to stop. Math is beautiful and anybody can learn to appreciate it!
edit on 8-12-2011 by cointelprotroll because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 10:40 AM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
reply to post by zigmeister

www.khanacademy.org...

A lot of local colleges also offer remedial math courses that might be worth checking out. You'll not only get great lessons, but you'll have the aid of a teacher (and possibly a tutor like me) at your beck and call should you get stuck.

Congratulations! You've taken the first step to knowledge... the realization you need to know. If you need any help, I am a PM away, and I am sure some of the other members will be willing to help as well.

TheRedneck


reply to post by TheRedneck
 


I agree with this one!!! khan Academy is a great site for learning math from the ground up. I started using it a month ago to try and catch up on high school math through college as I had been out of school for 26+ years. I found it to be a great help.
edit on 8-12-2011 by nonnez because: Forgot to quote.



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 03:59 PM
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reply to post by jerryznv

Can't help you there... I'm getting an AAS degree in Computer Science this spring with a 3.9 GPA... can program, disassemble and reassemble, debug, tweak, etc. a computer, but I can barely find the 'on' button on a TI-84! Much less a TI-89!

My daughter got a TI-84 a few years back for college. I took one look at it and told her "You're on your own with this thing."


 

reply to post by nonnez

After I complete my AAS in Computers this spring, I am planning on finishing up the AS in Engineering I started 25 years ago. I passed all the Calculus classes back then so I don't have to repeat them, but I have also forgotten a tremendous amount that I learned back then. I'll probably be using Khan Academy myself some this summer before I start back in the fall, along with sitting in on some calculus classes while I am tutoring. That should get me ready to take the higher math courses I will need.

The info is still there, but its buried pretty deep... gonna need a nudge to remember it all.


TheRedneck



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 04:07 PM
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reply to post by jerryznv

Can't help you there... I'm getting an AAS degree in Computer Science this spring with a 3.9 GPA... can program, disassemble and reassemble, debug, tweak, etc. a computer, but I can barely find the 'on' button on a TI-84! Much less a TI-89!

My daughter got a TI-84 a few years back for college. I took one look at it and told her "You're on your own with this thing."


I remember those days when a TI-83 looked like a space control device!


I appreciate the response though...I figured there would be a few fellows who had the scoop on the TI-89 but apperantly it must not be used a lot yet...it's still pretty new!

I'll keep checking the net and finding out what I can...maybe I'll get lucky and an expert will pop up on this thread with all the secrets!





edit on 8-12-2011 by jerryznv because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 04:13 PM
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reply to post by jerryznv

Or maybe you'll be the expert when people start asking questions about it.


Considering the math involved in a MS in Electrical Engineering, I might be one of those people...

TheRedneck



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 04:20 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
reply to post by jerryznv

Or maybe you'll be the expert when people start asking questions about it.


Considering the math involved in a MS in Electrical Engineering, I might be one of those people...

TheRedneck


Well if that day comes...I would be happy to share what I know about it!

There is still a bit I have left to hash out...but with any luck it shouldn't take too long...either way...I would be more than happy to share what I do know about the most basic of functions...and a few advanced functions.

With an MS in Electrical Engineering...the TI-83, 84, or 89 could become your best friend in your career. I am an EASA certified industrial electrician and math skill are handy for sure...but they are fool proof with a good calculating machine in your pocket!



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 04:28 PM
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It's been done. I suggest you sit down and read this fascinating book by Douglas Hofstadter:

Gödel, Escher, Bach

in which the guy deconstructs the philosophy of mathematics and illustrates how it runs into crippling paradoxes when you start to do things as simple as multiplication. It's not an easy read, but definitely worth the time. It may save you from covering a lot of the same ground.



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 04:33 PM
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When you get to the highschool leve I'd recommend you skip the "regular" irrational trigonometry and learn rational trigonometry instead. You might also want to check out the Pi -link in my sig and read the whole 3 pages...
edit on 8-12-2011 by JackTheTripper because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 04:40 PM
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reply to post by JackTheTripper
 





When you get to the highschool leve I'd recommend you skip the "regular" irrational trigonometry and learn rational trigonometry instead.


How often does a person study trig in high school...I mean algebra is about as advanced as there was when I was in high school...so I am curious?

Is trig part of the high school normal curriculum now days?

For the OP...the last thing you need to worry about is trig...get the basic fundamentals down first...move through...and worry about that later...like when your chasing your bachelors or masters degree!



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 04:44 PM
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Originally posted by Mianeye
I can't help you with your search, but i am in the same boat, exact same story.

I understand everything else, with the use of common sense and knowledge.
If i don't know about it i will read and learn about it, but when it comes to math. BAM! Annoying inteligence barrier, is kicking in, and there is no way around.

Unlike you i won't start over, life have come a long way for me allready, so im trying to concentrate on other things.

Here is a starter tip: 0+0=0


Im the same with maths. I joke with my GF(well half joke because it feels true) that Im mathematically dyslexic


edit on 8-12-2011 by ThePeopleParty because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 04:44 PM
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When you get to the highschool leve I'd recommend you skip the "regular" irrational trigonometry and learn rational trigonometry instead.


How often does a person study trig in high school...I mean algebra is about as advanced as there was when I was in high school...so I am curious?

Is trig part of the high school normal curriculum now days?


At least in scandinavia it is.. Why wouldn't it be?



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 04:49 PM
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Originally posted by JackTheTripper




When you get to the highschool leve I'd recommend you skip the "regular" irrational trigonometry and learn rational trigonometry instead.


How often does a person study trig in high school...I mean algebra is about as advanced as there was when I was in high school...so I am curious?

Is trig part of the high school normal curriculum now days?


At least in scandinavia it is.. Why wouldn't it be?


I don't know why it wouldn't be...that's why I am asking...maybe America is a bit behind...or at least when I graduated high school then...trig is something that is not even required for an associates degree in most cases...at least at the university I am at.

Associate degrees usually only require statistics 2050 and in some cases...problem solving 1000 is enough...trig is advanced and only needed to go on to a bachelors or master degree.

You Scandinavians might be miles ahead of us then...I don't know...I am curious too!



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 05:00 PM
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Originally posted by jerryznv
At least in scandinavia it is.. Why wouldn't it be?


I don't know why it wouldn't be...that's why I am asking...maybe America is a bit behind...or at least when I graduated high school then... [...]
Associate degrees usually only require statistics 2050 [...]

You Scandinavians might be miles ahead of us then...I don't know...I am curious too!


Well, statistically one feels averagely fine while he keeps his head in the oven and feet in the freezer... I think this is where things go haywire generally. Should it be taught? You tell me

edit on 8-12-2011 by JackTheTripper because: (no reason given)

edit on 8-12-2011 by JackTheTripper because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 05:04 PM
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Well, statistically one feels averagely fine while he keeps his head in the oven and feet in the freezer... I think this is where things go haywire generally. Should it be taught? You tell me
reply to post by JackTheTripper
 


No it should not be...at least not in high school...and your analogy has proven that it is just too complicated for young minds...IMHO!



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 05:07 PM
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reply to post by zigmeister
 


I think you may be similar to people such as myself who are left handed, right brained, more creative, good with grammar, bad with mathematics. I've taken more than a few algebra classes because it's hard for me to get it the first time, yet I excel in English and Art without even trying.



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 06:16 PM
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reply to post by zigmeister
 


Website developed by one of the best educators in the U.S. (i.e. Prof. Herbert Gross, and he's a very likable guy): www.adjectivenounmath.com...

www.sosmath.com...
tutorial.math.lamar.edu...
www.calculus.org...

An excellent resource for calculus I and II ideas. Plenty of proofs pointed out step-by-step, in addition to a multitude of drill problems and solutions: archives.math.utk.edu...

Good luck and I'm confident that your positive attitude will result in the accomplishment of your goal!



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 06:36 PM
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reply to post by JackTheTripper

I'm probably going to get a lot of flack for this, but it is my sincere belief that introductory algebra should be taught around the third grade, right after the addition/multiplication tables. Not advanced concepts, of course, but instead of asking over and over, year after year, "what is 2+2?", we should be asking kids "what is x when x=2+2?". It's not that difficult a concept for young minds, and it would introduce them to mathematical equalities on an intuitive level.

By the time a kid graduates high school, they should be capable of handling calculus. Or beyond.

That is the only way we are ever going to regain the status we once had in this country: education. And with challenges to our children instead of dull dry rote memorization, learning becomes fun and exciting instead of dull and dreary.

Every day at the college, I spend several hours explaining basic concepts to people who mistakenly believe they "can't do math". Little things, like handling negative numbers or there is no such thing as subtraction; it's just adding a negative. Fractions... they're nothing more than an unsolved division problem, but some people swear they're some sort of demonic gift from Lucifer himself!

The hardest math anyone ever takes is 2+2=4... those addition and multiplication tables. They're all memorization. Everything after that is just a few rules and how to make them work.

Let the flames begin.


TheRedneck



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 06:36 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


LoL! I was going to post the very same thing. That's a great web-site.

And like the OP, I regret not being better at math. When I was younger, teachers and schools often did not push girls enough in mathematics or science. So I made a lot of excuses for not being "good" at it but, really, I didn't even try very hard. What a waste. Years later I actually realized that I have an affinity for those subjects and I'm really sorry I let my self down by not being more diligent and studious.

I'm lucky that my husband likes to tutor me and has lots of patience.



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