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OWS Moves To Foreclosed Homes

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posted on Dec, 6 2011 @ 07:19 PM
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The Occupy Wall Street protests are moving into the neighborhood. Finding it increasingly difficult to camp in public spaces, Occupy protesters across the country are reclaiming foreclosed homes and boarded-up properties, signaling a tactical shift for the movement against wealth inequality. Groups in more than 25 cities held protests Tuesday on behalf of homeowners facing evictions.

In Atlanta, protesters held a boisterous rally at a county courthouse and used whistles and sirens to disrupt an auction of seized houses. In New York, they marched through a residential neighborhood in Brooklyn carrying signs that read "Foreclose on banks, not people." Southern California protesters rallied around a family of six that reclaimed the home they lost six months ago in foreclosure. "It's pretty clear that the fight is against the banks, and the Occupy movement is about occupying spaces. So occupying a space that should belong to homeowners but belongs to the banks seems like the logical next step for the Occupy movement," said Jeff Ordower, one of the organizers of Occupy Homes.





Protesters say that banks and financial firms own abandoned foreclosed houses that could be housing people. Seattle has become a leader in the anti-foreclosure movement as protesters took over a formerly boarded-up duplex last month. They painted the bare wood sidings with green, black and red paint, and strung up a banner that says "Occupy Everything - No Banks No Landlords."

While arrests have already been made in a couple of squatting cases in Seattle and Portland, it remains to be seen how authorities will react to this latest tactic. In Portland, police spokesman Sgt. Pete Simpson said he's aware that the movement called for people to occupy foreclosed homes, but said it's difficult to distinguish between the people who would squat in homes as a political statement and those that do it for shelter. "The vacant property issue is of concern in cities nationwide," Simpson said. "We'll treat them all as trespassers."

In Seattle, protesters took over a boarded-up warehouse slated for demolition last weekend. In an announcement, the protesters said they planned to make the warehouse into a community center, and hosted a party the night they opened the building. Police moved in soon after, arresting 16 people in the process of clearing it out. Seattle police spokesman Sgt. Sean Whitcomb said his department sees squatting in private properties as the same violation of trespassing Occupy Seattle made when it camped in a downtown park. "It's no different than when people were trespassing (in the park)," Whitcomb said. "We went nights and days, letting people camp in the park. We relied on education and outreach, rather than enforcing the law to the letter."


news.yahoo.com...
What say you?




posted on Dec, 6 2011 @ 07:22 PM
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There is a plenty room for all

bottom right on the page


www.usdebtclock.org...
edit on 6-12-2011 by xavi1000 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 6 2011 @ 07:23 PM
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I say they need a brain check for their mic check. Sorry to be flip, but this is about the worst idea I've ever heard. They've spent 3 months bashing, stomping, occupying and generally making life hell for the banks and other lenders. Now they're going to occupy the foreclosed properties these banks own?

Does anyone else think a few Bank Officers are sitting back thinking this is just every dream come true for a big Christmas present? Occupy will be willingly and enthusiastically putting themselves in the position of multiple felony crimes right on the bank's own property. They don't even need to appeal to anyone else to do something about their largest nemesis. They just need to call the law and tell them to serve, as the law demands.

I hope Occupy people very carefully consider this. The potential to backfire in real nasty ways is just so strong it's hard to see this ending any other way, given whats already happened between Occupy and those who hold the foreclosed properties.



posted on Dec, 6 2011 @ 07:25 PM
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Not sure about America, but squatting is legal in the UK.

I say good for them, make it hell for the banks - the banks deserve every bit of trouble thrown at them, I think this is a very good idea.




posted on Dec, 6 2011 @ 07:35 PM
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Finally, after all this time, they are actually doing something that represents what they believe in against those they claim to be oppossed to.

I bet the idea came from outside the group because they couldn;t have thought this up for themselves.



posted on Dec, 6 2011 @ 07:38 PM
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Originally posted by daggyz
Finally, after all this time, they are actually doing something that represents what they believe in against those they claim to be oppossed to.

I bet the idea came from outside the group because they couldn;t have thought this up for themselves.


Is that a real comment? How do you know they are incapable of thinking that thought?



posted on Dec, 6 2011 @ 07:40 PM
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reply to post by mr-lizard
 


In the United States, squatting laws vary from state to state and city to city. For the most part, it is rarely tolerated to any degree for long, particularly in cities. There have been a few exceptions, notably in 2002 when the New York City administration agreed to turn over eleven squatted buildings in the Lower East Side to an established non-profit group, on the condition that the apartments would later be turned over to the tenants as low-income housing cooperatives.



posted on Dec, 6 2011 @ 07:43 PM
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Originally posted by N3k9Ni
reply to post by mr-lizard
 


In the United States, squatting laws vary from state to state and city to city. For the most part, it is rarely tolerated to any degree for long, particularly in cities. There have been a few exceptions, notably in 2002 when the New York City administration agreed to turn over eleven squatted buildings in the Lower East Side to an established non-profit group, on the condition that the apartments would later be turned over to the tenants as low-income housing cooperatives.


Didn't know that, thanks for sharing.



posted on Dec, 6 2011 @ 11:59 PM
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Originally posted by daggyz
Finally, after all this time, they are actually doing something that represents what they believe in against those they claim to be oppossed to.

I bet the idea came from outside the group because they couldn;t have thought this up for themselves.

Why would you say something like that?

Why would you speak for an entire movement, and assume none of them could come up with an idea like this? Not really that tough of a thing to do.



posted on Dec, 7 2011 @ 12:09 AM
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So when they are getting kicked out of those foreclosed homes are they going to claim it is their constitutional right to be there again?

Are we as a nation supposed to tolerate this child like behavior?



posted on Dec, 7 2011 @ 12:44 AM
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reply to post by thehoneycomb
 

Additionally, they almost certainly won't leave a real light footprint on any home they 'Occupy' in, which will mean property damage. Before you know it, someone will get the idea there is copper in those walls and wow..that's worth money, and don't the banks owe everyone anyway??

I don't see it going anywhere good, to be sure and they will move beyond penny ante trespass pretty quickly. It's a real fine line to residential burglary and other charges tossed in if the cop writes the reports the right way to fit the law to the circumstance.



posted on Dec, 7 2011 @ 12:46 AM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


No it won't. But I think their idea was that, the foreclosure process was illegal. Ironically SEIU's Andy Stern was encouraging people not to pay their mortgages. These may just happen to be the same people that took his advice.



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 07:32 PM
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Adverse Possession

It may be trespassing but aren't banks notorious for letting the homes' maintenance fall? They are notorious for letting things go they simply have too many "properties" to keep up. And that means that if the person maintains the home, and the banks cannot produce sufficient evidence they own the home, then well, they may be S.O.L!!! I said this is what the movement should have done long ago, also I think they should use some of the donations and find ways to BUY back the homes and give them to the foreclosed on people. They certainly have a nice amount of cash now. And simply saying that OWS won't do that...well we will see whom is correct on this, I am betting they will do this if they can find the old owners.
But anyway in these cases it is not tresspassing per se if they are doing maintenance on the home, they are actually doing a service to those neighborhoods.
Remember this Texas man? Yeah they are trying to get him out of the home, why have they failed = failure to prove ownership/ neighbors have NO SAY!!!



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 07:38 PM
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reply to post by mr-lizard
 




Good, now give them a hammer and painting supplies and they can have jobs renovating those homes.

Problem solved.

NEXT?




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