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Giant volcanoes fall into a chasm in the seabed

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posted on Dec, 6 2011 @ 12:29 PM
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The power of mother nature never ceases to amaze me.

Startling new images from the depths of the Pacific Ocean reveal one of Earth's most violent processes: the destruction of massive underwater mountains.



Into the abyss Where the Pacific plate collides with the Indo-Australian plate, it is forced downwards into the trench, a subduction zone, and the volcanoes are carried with it.


www.bbc.co.uk...




posted on Dec, 6 2011 @ 12:32 PM
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True but at 5 to 8cm a year be like watching paint dry
Only kidding the power of nature is truly awesome.



posted on Dec, 6 2011 @ 12:35 PM
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reply to post by tarifa37
 


Still better than watching the TV

sl



posted on Dec, 7 2011 @ 10:14 PM
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reply to post by remymartin
 


Very cool, interesting.

Thanks.



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 06:45 AM
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It sounds like major plate action is taking place. Volcanoes dragged into the fault lines. I take its we're undergoing earth changes.



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 10:12 AM
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reply to post by Unity_99
 


This is happening at 6-10 Centimeters a year. Barely a few inches. If that. It has happened for billions of years and will continue to do so. The Earth is ALWAYS changing, that is the nature of a living planet. We as humans, see mountains as massive, nigh indestructible objects...but here we see them slowly torn apart and consumed into which they left so long ago.
edit on 8-12-2011 by Foxe because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2011 @ 10:18 AM
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reply to post by remymartin
 


Very cool...I just finished the semester with a geology class and I had the opportunity to learn all about this!

Awesome to see it making some headlines.

6 to 10 cm. a year might not seem like much...but over the span of a few hundred thousand years...thats a huge move...relatively young as far as geology goes...but huge for sure!



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