It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Comet* C/2011 W3 (Lovejoy) will graze the Suns photosphere and may pass thru corona intact..

page: 1
8
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 6 2011 @ 09:48 AM
link   
Another Kreutz comet will be coming close to the SUN and may or may not even be destroyed? The comet C/2011 W3 (Lovejoy) will graze the Sun and may even present a visual of it during the daylight. What is interesting about this discovery is its a first ground-based discovery of a Kreutz sun grazing comet since 1970!





newly discovered comet is racing toward a mid-December rendezvous with the sun — a rendezvous that it will likely not survive.
The comet is categorized by astronomers as a "sungrazer" and it is destined to do just that; literally graze the surface of the sun (called the photosphere) and pass through the sun's intensely hot corona, where temperatures have been measured at upwards of 3.6-million degrees Fahrenheit (2-million degrees Celsius).

While the comet will not collide with the sun, most astronomers say the odds are rather long that it will remain intact after its closest pass by the sun. The most exciting aspect of the event is that the comet's expected destruction should be visible on your computer monitor.

And there is a very slight chance that, should the comet somehow manage to survive, it might briefly become visible in broad daylight. [Amazing New Sun Photos from Space]




Discovery
The comet was discovered by Australian amateur astronomer Terry Lovejoy Nov. 27 using a C8 Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope, working with a QHY9 CCD camera.

At first, Lovejoy believed that the rapidly moving fuzzy image he saw was nothing more than a camera reflection. But two nights later, despite clouds and haze, he managed to find the fuzzy object again and take several new images.

Lovejoy then put out a call to some trusted observers to confirm his observations. He received that confirmation Dec. 1 from Mount John Observatory, based in the Mackenzie Basin on the South Island of New Zealand. By then, 31 separate observations of the comet had been collected to determine an orbit, and the first announcement of Lovejoy's discovery was made this past Friday (Dec. 2) by the Minor Planet Center of the International Astronomical Union.

Its official title is C/2011 W3 (Lovejoy). It is Terry Lovejoy's third comet discovery.

Grazing the sun

Astronomer Gareth V. Williams computed a preliminary orbit for the comet, which indicates that perihelion (closest approach to the sun) will occur at 7 p.m. EST Dec. 15 (00:00 GMT on Dec. 16) at a distance of 548,000 miles (882,000 km) from the center of the sun, meaning that the comet will skim a mere 115,000 miles (186,000 km) above the solar surface, putting it into the special classification of a "Kreutz Sun grazer."

"I'm still quite stunned by the fact that W3 is a Kreutz Sungrazing comet," Lovejoy said. "This
is a very special discovery to me as I have long been fascinated by the Kreutz Sun grazing comets; it has been over four years since my last discovery and I do hope the next one comes a lot sooner!"

Lovejoy's discovery is rather special since it marks the first time that a Kreutz Sun grazer has been discovered from a ground-based telescope in over 40 years. Usually, such comets are discovered only within a few days of their closest approach to the sun, from satellite imagery.





Some examples of (previous) Kreutz (sun gazing comets) in action below..



These are Terry's 3 discovery images taken on the night of November 27, 2011; they have been stacked and aligned (which is why all stars are in trplicate). The blurry fellow in the center of the frame is the comet. Images courtesy of Terry Lovejoy.



minorplanetcenter.net...

Just a little Celestial update for ATS, thoughts? Also I cannot find the size if any member can and can add to thread it would be appreciated. Thanks in advance

info link below
www.space.com...

edit on 12/6/11 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 6 2011 @ 09:52 AM
link   
Totally cool..It looks like it already hit to the left or one major solar flare..LOL...Hope we can see it in the daylight...I have to read again to see when its coming already forgot....



posted on Dec, 6 2011 @ 09:53 AM
link   

Originally posted by eeks4
Totally cool..It looks like it already hit to the left or one major solar flare..LOL...Hope we can see it in the daylight...I have to read again to see when its coming already forgot....


Is there anyway to find out the exact date on this???



posted on Dec, 6 2011 @ 09:55 AM
link   

Originally posted by eeks4
Totally cool..It looks like it already hit to the left or one major solar flare..LOL...Hope we can see it in the daylight...I have to read again to see when its coming already forgot....


No lol it didnt hit these are examples of some previous passes or collisions from other Kreutz comets..


@Is there anyway to find out the exact date on this??? it was discovered NOV-27-2011 my friend


edit on 12/6/11 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 6 2011 @ 09:58 AM
link   
That video of the comet didn't "graze" the sun, that particular object slammed right into the sun and there was a massive CME right after it stuck. I remember that one from a few months ago, the last few images of it impacting were scarce online, most are of what you posted, an incomplete series of images.

And they say it may be visible during the daylight? That is very unusual.



posted on Dec, 6 2011 @ 10:00 AM
link   
possible large 'sundiver' comet anticipated on the 15th
www.abovetopsecret.com...

On December 2nd, 2011, newly discovered Kreutz-group comet C/2011 W3 (Lovejoy) was announced.



posted on Dec, 6 2011 @ 10:02 AM
link   

Originally posted by alfa1
possible large 'sundiver' comet anticipated on the 15th
www.abovetopsecret.com...

On December 2nd, 2011, newly discovered Kreutz-group comet C/2011 W3 (Lovejoy) was announced.





AHH we need a better search tool
thanks for that. MODS if you feel its duplicating anothers data feel free to close.



posted on Dec, 12 2011 @ 04:11 PM
link   

Originally posted by eeks4

Originally posted by eeks4
Totally cool..It looks like it already hit to the left or one major solar flare..LOL...Hope we can see it in the daylight...I have to read again to see when its coming already forgot....


Is there anyway to find out the exact date on this???


If you're asking when it'll be swinging around the Sun, its closest approach (to the Sun) will be on the 16th, but it'll be BEHIND the Sun from our point of view. If it survives passing so close to it (less than 200,000 km from its surface), we'll see it come out the other side. Given how small the comet is (no, we don't know the exact size), we're not expecting it to survive. It will just evaporate!

Some of you might want to keep an eye out for Comet Lovejoy on the SOHO website, as it entered the telescope's field of view last night. You can read all about it (and see the videos of it) on the continuously updated Sungrazing Comets page dedicated to Comet Lovejoy.

I'd also like to take this opportunity to comment on another subject that I see mentioned often, which is that of comets causing CMEs (Coronal Mass Ejections) when they hit the Sun. I want to underline how rare it is for a comet to actually *hit* the Sun; the majority of the sungrazing comets are just that, Sun *grazers*, not Sun *hitters*. CMEs, on the other hand, are extremely common during periods of high solar activity, so it's not surprising that when a comet passes by we see a CME within a few hours.

The above SunGrazer website has a very nice write up explaining why comets don't induce CMEs. I recommend you all read it.


edit on 2011/12/12 by JLGalache because: Inserted inline links



posted on Dec, 12 2011 @ 04:14 PM
link   
reply to post by JLGalache
 


Thanks JLGalache for the update and location of the comet and which direction it will be comming in from. It would be an interesting site to see keeping in mind that its said if it passes thru it will be seen in daylite.



posted on Dec, 12 2011 @ 04:32 PM
link   

Originally posted by JLGalache

Originally posted by eeks4

Originally posted by eeks4
Totally cool..It looks like it already hit to the left or one major solar flare..LOL...Hope we can see it in the daylight...I have to read again to see when its coming already forgot....


Is there anyway to find out the exact date on this???


If you're asking when it'll be swinging around the Sun, its closest approach (to the Sun) will be on the 16th, but it'll be BEHIND the Sun from our point of view. If it survives passing so close to it (less than 200,000 km from its surface), we'll see it come out the other side. Given how small the comet is (no, we don't know the exact size), we're not expecting it to survive. It will just evaporate!

Some of you might want to keep an eye out for Comet Lovejoy on the SOHO website, as it entered the telescope's field of view last night. You can read all about it (and see the videos of it) on the continuously updated Sungrazing Comets page dedicated to Comet Lovejoy.

I'd also like to take this opportunity to comment on another subject that I see mentioned often, which is that of comets causing CMEs (Coronal Mass Ejections) when they hit the Sun. I want to underline how rare it is for a comet to actually *hit* the Sun; the majority of the sungrazing comets are just that, Sun *grazers*, not Sun *hitters*. CMEs, on the other hand, are extremely common during periods of high solar activity, so it's not surprising that when a comet passes by we see a CME within a few hours.

The above SunGrazer website has a very nice write up explaining why comets don't induce CMEs. I recommend you all read it.


edit on 2011/12/12 by JLGalache because: Inserted inline links


Thank you so much for the info..your great>>>>> have a good evening



posted on Dec, 13 2011 @ 11:11 PM
link   
Here is comet Lovejoy entering the field of view of SOHO C2 earlier today.

Image is large and hi-res, use the scrolls to find it above the date.....


edit on 13-12-2011 by charlyv because: clarity



posted on Dec, 13 2011 @ 11:25 PM
link   
Comets are no more than 50 km in diameter, if this thing gets to within 200,000 km from the sun it will not survive. That distance is hotter than the surface of the sun, (photosphere)!



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 12:01 AM
link   

Originally posted by Illustronic
Comets are no more than 50 km in diameter, if this thing gets to within 200,000 km from the sun it will not survive. That distance is hotter than the surface of the sun, (photosphere)!


Agree, and it is happening that way. The latest images show the nucleus vaporizing as we speak.


edit on 14-12-2011 by charlyv because: spelling , where caught



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 08:18 AM
link   
reply to post by charlyv
 




reply to post by Illustronic
 



Thank you both for adding in the observation data..



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 11:52 AM
link   
Some more updated Lovejoy info. I hope it will make it thru and allow a interesting day time visual to be observed..





Comet Lovejoy as Viewed by SOHOCredit: SOHO The sungrazing comet Lovejoy entered the field of view of NASA's SOHO satellite's LASCO C3 camera on Dec. 14, 2011. The comet is visible as the bright streak on the bottom.









Comet Lovejoy StarchartCredit: STEREO/SECCHI NRLData from NASA's STEREO spacecraft show the sungrazing comet Lovejoy in relation to background stars on Dec. 11, 2011.








Comet Lovejoy View from STEREO Ahead SpacecraftCredit: STEREOSTEREO will also be observing the comet from its positions on each side of the Sun. This is the view that the Ahead and Behind spacecraft will have.







Comet Lovejoy View from Earth (SOHO)Credit: STEREOThis is the basic trajectory of Comet Lovejoy that will be seen by SOHO and SDO







Comet Lovejoy Seen by Remanzacco ObservatoryCredit: Ernesto Guido, Giovanni Sostero & Nick HowesAmateur astronomers Ernesto Guido, Giovanni Sostero and Nick Howes caught these views of comet C/2011 W3 Lovejoy on Dec. 4, 2011, using the robotic GRAS Observatory telescope in Australia. The image was taken as the comet neared the sun for an expected Dec. 15/16 pass through the solar corona



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 12:00 PM
link   
reply to post by Ophiuchus 13
 


SpaceWeather.com talks about a comet diving in the sun, however they expected 15/16th of December, is this the same one or we talk about 2 distinct objects?




A comet nearly as wide as two football fields (200m) is plunging toward the sun where it will most likely be destroyed in a spectacular light show on Dec. 15/16. Although Comet Lovejoy (C/2011 W3) could become as bright as Jupiter or Venus when it "flames out," the glare of the sun will hide the event from human eyes



posted on Dec, 14 2011 @ 12:12 PM
link   
reply to post by Romanian
 


Yes this is the same comet my friend.
Its said it has a chance to punch thru the photosphere as heated an area that is. What interest me most is how can an Iceball get so close and possibly pass thru befor being melted...

edit on 12/14/11 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 15 2011 @ 11:37 AM
link   
Damn, the sun filter back I ordered for my C8 is not going to arrive in time. Hope some amateurs out there are looking and will post something if it turns out that this thing survives. It does not look good from the current SOHO images, but who knows!



posted on Dec, 15 2011 @ 11:47 AM
link   
Update:
The images on the SOHO and SunGrazer sites are absolutely amazing, a must see!



posted on Dec, 15 2011 @ 11:52 AM
link   
reply to post by charlyv
 


Thank you I am going to check it out...

edit on 12/15/11 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)



new topics

top topics



 
8
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join